Stringing time with cheap machines?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by djones, Jul 12, 2004.

  1. djones

    djones Hall of Fame

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    At my local tennisstore they have a real sophisticated machine which only takes up to 15 minutes stringing a racquet.
    But how long would it take to string racquet on those very cheap machines below 200 bucks?
    I might wanna get myself one to make an extra buck if possible, but if it takes to much time it really isn't going to pay of I guess.
     
  2. ffrpg

    ffrpg Professional

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    It truely depends on the person. My first string job took me over an hour to do on a ATS SSII.
     
  3. Ben42

    Ben42 Semi-Pro

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    On an ATS SSII it taked me about 40 minutes. I string one ahead on crosses and my weaving has gotten fairly quick, but I also just sit on my living room floor and watch tv as I do it.
     
  4. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    It will probably take you over an hour to string a racquet the first few times you do one on a drop weight machine. It takes practice to improve your speed without compromising quality. It also takes extra time for poly and nat gut strings. Poly is very stiff and it is more difficult to tension on a drop weight and also to weave the crosses. Nat gut takes extra steps and care to produce a quality string job. As Ben42 said, you should be able to work you way down to well under an hour with practice and experience. 30 mins. would be a very good time on most drop weights.
     
  5. coach

    coach Semi-Pro

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    When you say you string "one ahead" what do you mean? Are you double pulling and tensioning two crosses at once?
     
  6. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    coach, I'm not ben42, but here's my take on this....stringing one ahead on the crosses really means weaving two crosses at once to start with, leaving a loop of string on the outside of the frame between the two strings long enough to reach the tension head. Then tension is pulled on the first string. Then the 3rd string is weaved one ahead of the 2nd string, then the 2nd string is tensioned and so on. Another way to look at this is you are always tensioning the string one behind the one you just weaved. This takes advantage of the stagger between the main strings and makes the second cross easier weave and pull through. When you get about 3/4 of the way down to the other end there isn't as much advantage because the mains are being pulled tight by the crosses and there's not as much stagger between them. This technique improves stringing speed and reduces friction on the mains.
     
  7. drop shot

    drop shot Rookie

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    stringing times

    I can string most racquets on my Gama 4000 in about 30 minutes. This is without weaving ahead. I am not the fastest by far but 30 minutes isn't too bad I guess.
     
  8. borisboris

    borisboris Semi-Pro

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    :oops: I have a 25 yr old drop weight w/ no clutch and I litterally finnish @ 1.5 hrs everytime.... My 1st job took over 2 hrs. I string w/ poly and don't know how to improve my time - I seem to go fast but it's always 1.5 hrs. I don't mind because I like stringing my weapons but some fellow players laugh at my time but oh well. The total process takes 2 hrs. Pre-stretch then set up then clamp then put away.
     
  9. coach

    coach Semi-Pro

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    I think the clutch, or rachet as Gamma calls it, is very helpful. If you had a drop weight with a clutch, it would save time. Also, other posters on this site say that stringing poly takes longer. If you strung a non-poly on a machine with a clutch, you would probably save 30 minutes I'm guessing.
     
  10. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    I used to use an old ATS Super Stringer (before they had a racheting tensioner). I never found poly's to be that bad, just different. I thought the hardest ones to string were the super elastic strings that, when tensioned, the weight bar drop all the way to the stop, so you had to clamp the string and retension it while taking the clamp off. What a pain. As for how much time it will take you to string, the crank is faster than the drop weight, but when you first start, the weaving is what's going to be the time-consuming part of stringing.
     
  11. bsandy

    bsandy Hall of Fame

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    The reason I take my time with Polys is they don't always completly find their way into the grommets on the far side on the first drop. I almost always give them a 2nd drop and almost always need to take up some more slack !

    . . . Bud
     
  12. Marc C.

    Marc C. Rookie

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    even though my e. stringer is $250, i will still post this. I started out at about 1 hour and now (2 years later) i string a racket at the fastest in about 16 minutes.
     
  13. coach

    coach Semi-Pro

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    16 minutes? Are you one of those maverick stringers that strings MAINS ONLY?!?!? Hey Gaines, let's get this guy a urine test, methinks he is doping to prime himself for the stringing Olympics! :lol:
     
  14. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    Coach, Marc gets my vote for a gold medal! :)
     

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