stringing wrong?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Squid, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. Squid

    Squid Rookie

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    is there a way that you can string wrong that harms the frame not including skipping grommets or stringing overly tight?
     
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  2. Jon Terminator

    Jon Terminator Rookie

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    stringing from throat to head is usually a pretty bad idea...
     
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  3. Squid

    Squid Rookie

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    what do you mean by that?
     
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  4. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    That's when the stringer starts the cross strings at the throat of the racquet, instead of at the top.

    You could also damage a racquet by not mounting securely. This could allow the frame to distort during the stringing process.

    You could totally wreck a racquet by not tightening down the mounting posts and or frame retainers on a two point machine. You could crack a frame by tightening the frame retainers down too tight.

    You could allow a grommet to withdraw into the frame ( Prince TT Airstick comes to mind ) when you pull a cross. This could leave the string exposed to the frame.
     
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  5. Cruzer

    Cruzer Professional

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    Actually this not true. Some posters on these boards consistently maintain that crosses should not be strung throat to head however the USRSA publishes a book of racquet stringing patterns that describe a huge number of racquets having crosses strung throat to head. I have always strung my Babolat Pure Drives and Aero Pro Drives throat to head without any problem. The Babolat website provides stringing patterns that have crosses being string throat to head.

    There are ways you can damage a frame when stringing if you are not careful. Every frame has a recommended tension range and stringing a racquet significantly higher than the highest recommended tension would result in frame damage. Improper mounting on the stringer could also lead to frame damage while stringing a racquet. In general most frames are pretty durable and you would have to do something fairly extreme to damage it while stringing it.
     
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  6. Squid

    Squid Rookie

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    the reason why i am asking, is because if any of you can imagine..... when looking at the side of your frame, where the grommet holes are, my friend told me i strung it wrong because where i strung was different to where the past strings "groove" is. now i am not talking about a groove that was disigned into the racket, but the groove that is made when the racket is first strung. do any of you know what i am talking about? when he say this he said that i strung it wrong. i believe this was BS since i dont think he knows anything about stringing and i didnt miss any grommets. what i think the reason why this is is becuase since the racket can be strung from either side, and if you string it upside down, (the writing is upside down) then that would create that different groove. again, does anyone know waht i am talk about?

    please help. and thx in advance.
     
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  7. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    If you are refering to the cross strings, you are right. Depending on which side you start on, the empty "groove" will alternate.
     
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  8. tedmeister

    tedmeister Rookie

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    I wouldn't worry about that too much. Happens all the time when you bring your racquets to a shop and it gets worked on by different stringers that sometimes do not pay close attention to their stringing. Some grommet strips just get "grooved" easily more than others. Just to be extra consistent, I always make sure I tie off on the previous flared grommets which means that the frame has to be installed the same side up all the time. If done the other way, you will end up having two extra busted grommets if you do a 2 piece job. After a few jobs like that, you will end up having to tube or repair/replace a grommet.
     
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  9. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    Squid, you're fine if you did all the other things right. That just means you turned the racket over, so they lined up just the opposite from what they normally do.

    Cruzer is definitely wrong. Wilson is one of the few companies that allows bottom to top stringing, but it's still not a good idea. I had a guy write me in December about stringing his son's Babolat's. He said that every time he strung one-piece, the racket would crack. So far, he had cracked 3 frames. We went over his stringing step-by-step. He was stringing from the bottom to top. All had broken at 9 o'clock or 10 o'clock. I said he should try an around-the-world pattern or use a 2 piece method. He's done both, and so far, no more have cracked. So, you could take your chances like Cruzer. You might get lucky. I wouldn't. There's no reason to string the 3rd best pattern anyway, if you learn the best and 2nd best way to string it.
     
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  10. Squid

    Squid Rookie

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    hey steve huff...... can you give me any sights.... that like show you step by step around the world and two peice..... i think i have done 2 peice before when i hybrided.... can you please show me... and thank you very much for telling me this now, i am planning to be my high school team's stringer... and several of the kids there use a pure drive. i would'nt want to ow my friends 170$ for a new pure drive. thanks again in advance.
     
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  11. Newberry

    Newberry Rookie

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    Squid,
    I noticed on the (take the spaces out) s p tennis.com site, under videos the newer video of the speed stringing contest has a USRSA member stringing "around the world". He's the third or fourth stringer. The process is explained somewhat, and it may help with your understanding of the technique.
     
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  12. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    squid, I posted one of the most popular ATW patterns here recently. If you do a search I'm sure you'll find it.
     
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  13. Cruzer

    Cruzer Professional

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    OK smart guy WHY do get manuals from the USRSA annually that describe stringing crosses from the bottom up?? I have asked this question several times before and no one has ever had an answer. Maybe you do know since you know absolutely everything about stringing every racquet in existence. I can hardly wait to hear the answer. As I wrote previously why does Babolat on their website provide stringing patterns for their racquets that have crosses strung from the bottom up??
    My response to the original comment in this thread was that it is NOT universally wrong to string crosses from the bottom up. That is a fact. Get off your high horse and acknowledge that there are often a few acceptable methods to string a racquet.
     
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  14. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    Some manufacturers allow bottom up stringing. It is common with Wilson and Babolat. I've seen it on a few Prince frames too. It is a big no no on Yonex and Head frames and will void the warranty. However, it's pretty much agreed that stringing any frame bottom up puts more stress on it. There should never be a problem with the warranty if you follow their instuctions, but it's never a problem stringing any racquet top down and if you want to be even safer that's the best way to do it. That's where ATW patterns came from. They allow frames whose mains end at the throat to be strung one piece with the crosses done top down.
     
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