Strings for cold weather?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by sw2ny888, Sep 30, 2008.

  1. sw2ny888

    sw2ny888 New User

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    I don't know if it is just me or what. This afternoon, I was playing a match with a friend. I found out my shots are off a lot, especially the putaway shots. I was making a lot of errors. I also notice that my racquet is lacking the power I need for the shot. The "pocketing" feel is also gone. Is this because of the temperature? Anyone else has observed the change of the feel of the racquet? Can someone suggest a string that is good for cold weather? It was about 60F this afternoon here in NY. I was using ps tour 90, MSV hex 1.18 for main @50lb and MSV co-polymo 1.18 for cross @52lb.
     
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  2. binomialtheory

    binomialtheory Rookie

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    I thought weather really only changed the way natural gut played.
     
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  3. 2ndserveace

    2ndserveace Semi-Pro

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    Strings tighten up in cold weather. 60F doesn't seem like enough to have that much of an effect though.
     
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  4. tennisfreak15347

    tennisfreak15347 Banned

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    yes, i can definitely feel a change between weather. In the summer, I found that I had to change strings a lot, due to tension loss. This was either due to the weather or the fact that I played every day in the summer, but I definitely felt a difference between 90 degrees Fahrenheit and 60. (day and night playing)
     
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  5. slkbassist

    slkbassist Rookie

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    Cold weather effects not just Nat. Gut. You can feel it in synth and poly as well. I remember one day when our team had a big match up coming up and we still had to practice in the cold (well cold for Florida High 40's maybe very low 50's)- underestimating the cold and playing in shorts and a hoodie on clay. Woo Boy that was not fun, freezing, sc****d from a fall, each shot felt like I was hittiing with a plank, no feel whatsoever.

    I would suggest get a soft string multi, and string it a bit lower than you normally do.
     
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  6. sw2ny888

    sw2ny888 New User

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    The first time I tried natural gut, it was in the winter and I was playing outside at 40s. It felt like crap. Then I tried it again indoor, it was amazingly good. Unfortunately, it lasted me only 30min.
     
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  7. kalic

    kalic Professional

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    I feel that both frame and strings are stiffer when it's cold
     
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  8. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    I can relate, I have the same issue here in Atlanta when you go from 80 and 90deg days to 50 and 40 degree evenings in the spring and fall.

    If you are looking for a cool/cold weather string, I would go with a full multi string job with X-One Biphase, Yonex Tour Super, Volkl Powe Fibre, Babolat Fibertour or Xcel, etc...

    If you are looking for a string with good playability where the temperature varies a lot every few days, I don't think there is one.....you just have to string it to feel good when it is hot or cold and deal with it when the weather is opposite what you strung for.

    Personally I like stringing my frame for hot weather and swing out a little more when it colder. I don't like a racquet that works when it is cold but I have to hold back when it's warm.

    my $.03
     
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  9. Bad Dog

    Bad Dog Semi-Pro

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    Good advice; probably at least 3 or 4 pounds lighter for a 30 or 40 degree F drop. Don't pre-stretch.
     
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  10. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    Don't agree with the 3-4 lbs lighter. Change 1 thing at a time so you know what affect each change has.

    Change string type to multi first and leave tension same as other string. Once you play with the multi at the other string's tension then you can decide whether, how much and in what dircection to change the tension.
     
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  11. brownbearfalling

    brownbearfalling Hall of Fame

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    You might also note the playing environment. The cold weather (dense air) might have slowed the ball down and even more if the balls were older.
    ________
    Chevrolet Nova Specifications
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2011
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  12. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    Good thought but i don't think the balls are traveling fast enough for air density to come into play. I think if the balls traveled closer to the speed of aircraft you would see a difference, but I don't think a sub 100mph tennis ball is going to be affected by density change as much as you might think.
     
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  13. dmtree

    dmtree Rookie

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    i was playing today in low 40s temperature and noticed how much harder the balls' rubber was, how much heavier they felt, and how much lower they bounced. it was a very different game.

    the strings (poly/syngut hybrid) were really hard and boardy, i had to hit really hard to get any response.
     
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  14. Tanner

    Tanner New User

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    I have several racquets and the only one that didn't seem to be affected by the change in temp had Prince XX lightning. It played normal . Also everyone else that day seemed to be having trouble with shots regardless of string. So yes temp does effect string playability
     
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  15. LMW

    LMW Rookie

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    I used Alpha Gut 2000 (18G) while playing winter tennis in the UK. It played great in cold (including freezing) temperatures.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2008
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  16. TheRed

    TheRed Professional

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    just lower the tension 2-4 lbs
     
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  17. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Well not so much by the air density due to temp change, but the cold certainly has an effect on the pressure in the balls, which is clearly seen, even just dropping them from eye height, they don't bounce as high as they would on a 90F summer day. (and correspondingly don't come off the racquet face the same)

    I would say that as far as the ball flying through the air, that humidity plays a much greater role than air density due to temp.

    J
     
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