Strings on wooden racquets

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by Treeman, Feb 13, 2014.

  1. Treeman

    Treeman New User

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    I have two wooden racquets: a Bjorn Borg Bancroft signature and a Tru Play Net Master. I am going to list my questions.

    1. Both racquets have a piece of string that tie across the main strings. One at the top and one at the bottom. What is this for? (You can see one in the second photo.)

    2. The Tru Play has tight strings; looks like mono-filament (looks just like the cheap strings they gave us in high school) and there is no stencil. I am guessing these are not the original strings, but the racquet has the string tied across the top and bottom of the main strings like the bjorn borg racquet. Was this racquet strung recently?
    [​IMG]

    3. The bjorn borg racquet still has the stencil so I am guessing they are the original strings. What kind of strings are they? btw the bjorn borg racquet feels great to hit with.
    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]

    4. I know nothing about the Tru Play, does anyone know anything about these? I am guessing that the Bjorn Borg is from the late 70's?
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Bottom and top are strings to try to keep the mains in place after a little hitting, because the cheap strings used just shift constantly. Notice they loop around each main.
    No stringer would bother, because he uses decent strings.
     
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  3. Treeman

    Treeman New User

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    So it is kind of like a sting saver? EDIT: So the Tru Play probably has the original strings?
     
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  4. StringingIrvine

    StringingIrvine Semi-Pro

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    I'm really thinking about stringing up my old woodie with a poly hybrid. Anyone try it out?

    I'm thinking some thick gauge poly at low tension so it doesn't notch the wood too bad. Maybe some make shift grommets with nylon tubing?
     
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  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Nylon was used a bit, even by pros on the Wilson team, used mainly for their practice rackets. BlueStar we used on Rameriz and Cahill practice only rackets.
    Nylon tubing can be replaced by burning the holes a bit before stringing. You know, just a 20" piece of scrap string, run see saw though the holes that turn the strings. Tubing just takes too much time, and tension changes are noticable.
    Old racket, perhaps there is no need to prep the holes.
     
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  6. StringingIrvine

    StringingIrvine Semi-Pro

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    Thanks for the tip! It should be delivered today I can't wait to take it out for a test hit.

    I found a decent condition wilson chris evert labeled speed flex fibre face. I just got it cause it was a 4 1/4 light.
    Leed do you have an estimation on how heavy the racket will be?
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Chrissy's should weigh less than KramerProStaffs, so if you have a L, possibly in the 11 oz range.
    Don't hit too many flat serves, and don't return serves hard and flat with your forehand. Stress fractures start to show within a few days, across the throat, along the bottom of the head, and sometimes across 3-9 from hard hitting.
    I was using mostly M, which were not readily availible, had to be ordered in advance. The WilsonRep asked me to use KramerAuto's instead, but I liked the feel of the ProStaffs and the brown diamonds.
    Is it the WilsonChrisEvertAutograph? I think that's a lightenned ProStaff.
     
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  8. StringingIrvine

    StringingIrvine Semi-Pro

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    Yeah it says chris evert autograph. Oh shoot I was hoping it'd come in somewhere around 12 oz. I guess i could play with this one until it gets banged up and just grab another one.
     
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  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    We never actually weighed any of the WilsonTeam rackets.
    Most of the team used M, and Gottfried H's. We didn't string Gottfried's rackets.
    My ProStaff M's would weigh in around 13. L's, my first 3, around 12 oz.
    Stock StanSmith L's at 12.7, my first 3 rackets.
    Chrissies were scary light for the times, around 1979 or so.
    Colin Dibley had PrimoCarnera, our head stringer, add 4 total layers of 4oz cloth and polyester resin to the throat and head of his 13 oz DunlopMaxPly for the fast serve contest.
     
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  10. StringingIrvine

    StringingIrvine Semi-Pro

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    I ended up stringing it up with big hitter black zone at 30 lbs and it was quite fun to play with. Strung up it weighted 360g with 5 points HL balance. Obviously there wasn't as much pace but boy was it fun to hit with.

    I'm on my GF's 3.5 team maybe i'll only play with a woody to make things a little fair =p.
     
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  11. rodracquet

    rodracquet Rookie

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    These strings called TREBLING had been used on racquets dating back to before Lawn Tennis was invented. The very early wood racquets sometimes had up to 5 Trebling sets on top and bottom. While you can argue that they serve a purpose in preventing main strings from moving, you will gather that given the sweet spot the main strings would still move anyway.

    Rather than be that functional I think they started to become part of the "look" of a design as decals, air brush paintwork etc became fashionable. Right up into the 70's matching or coloured trebling made them look a lot nicer. My old favourite the YONEX 8500 green aluminium would look naked without its green trebling.

    In addition to this type of trebling it was also prevalent to surround the sweet spot with Trebling which arguably would be beneficial. So two mains and two crosses 2 or 3 strings in would therefore create a square.

    In the 1880's some models were strung with an entirely looped pattern. That is every cross was looped around a main string full width. I doubt you could keep the tension up on these but it would be a robust pattern for sure.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2014
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  12. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    You could spin for serve using "rough" or "smooth."
    Notice the little strings are all looped the same way so that if you ran your finger across them one side would be smooth.
     
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  13. Tonyr1967

    Tonyr1967 Rookie

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    +1

    If my memory serves, they were normally made from nylon or cotton based cord and hand tied. No way would they ever fitted to stop the strings from moving.
     
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  14. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Good explanation Rod.
    I have never heard that theory thrown out about holding the strings in place. The treblings were creative designs that took more skill and time than those old natural gut string jobs. Here is one that squares out around the sweet spot.

    http://www.woodtennis.com/museum/1920_Kent/3kent1.jpg
     
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  15. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    One of the nicest examples I have ever seen. Thanks Joe.

    I assume the increased frequency of string breakage was one of the main causes of the extinction of trebling. A few stringing suppliers still sold it well into the 1980s but I certainly have not seen any new or new old stock of trebling in many, many years. I have a couple of circa 1920s/30s frames that are unstrung and have thought about stringing them up for appearances sake but generally have not because I would want to add the trebling.
     
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  16. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    You are correct that the old treblings are very hard to find these days, especially the natural gut type. I have some of the syn gut types made in the 60s era. I know a collector who does have some of the old gut types, let me know if you interested, Ill give you his contact.
     
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