***Stringway Machine Users Club***

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by 10SDad, Apr 19, 2013.

  1. johndagolfer

    johndagolfer Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Messages:
    797
    Nope the one on the side. Sometimes if the pull is two short(to set the initial tension) the tension head will not pull completely. You then have to do a minor step on the pedal the hit the release switch on the side to get a full pull.
     
  2. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1,572
    Lubricating/Adjusting T98 Double action fixed clamps

    I need to adjust and lubricate my T98 Clamps.

    If I adjust the clamps loose, they wobble/skid on the rail and do not glide smoothly but if I tighten, they bind up so I think I may need to lubricate.

    On the Stringway manual:

    GREASING THE CLAMP
    For easy up and down sliding of the clamp it is advised to insert a
    thick layer of grease into the hollow that clamps the clamp on the pin of the sliding system.
    Where is this "hollow" the manual refers to? Thick layer of grease? Silicon or Lithium lube OK?
     
  3. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    It sounds like what you are describing as needing to do and what you are quoting from the manual are perhaps two different things. If you are referring to the entire clamp mechanism sliding horizontally on the rails, I would recommend wiping the rails down good with mineral spirits or denatured alcohol to remove all residue, then use a spray silicone lubricant directly on the rails to enable easier sliding. Do not use grease/lithium on the rails. If, however, you are referencing the clamps sliding vertically/spinning on the pins, you can leave the clamp open and slide it straight up and off of the pin. The "hollow" part the manual refers to is the inside of the two halves of the clamp that slide over the pin. Unless you want to take the clamps apart, you will likely find it easier to apply lubricant directly to the pin rather than trying to get it up into the inside of the clamp. For this I'd recommend a thin layer of white lithium grease.

    I purchased my machine second-hand as well, and did a full cleaning of all parts including disassembling the clamps. I found that once I thoroughly cleaned the rails and pins that the clamps operated much easier even before I applied any lubrication. For any surfaces that the string or racquet will come in contact with, I'd recommend cleaning with denatured alcohol and not mineral spirits. Mineral spirits is good for all other parts of the machine. Use white lithium grease on the clamp pins as well as the turntable pin (the turntable will lift up and off of its pin), and use spray silicone for the rails, movable parts of the tension head (including inside/below where the spring is), and other areas of the machine...but again use caution not to get silicone on string clamping surfaces (clamps, tension head) nor on the racquet mounting surfaces. You want those clean but not lubricated.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2013
  4. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    I don't have any experience with the pedal operated model. You may want to contact Mark at Alpha or Fred at Stringway to get a good answer on this one. Both great guys, and I'm sure willing to give you direction on your issue.
     
  5. BlxTennis

    BlxTennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2010
    Messages:
    338
    Yeah, I have the peal operated model but I am not sure if I understand your problem. My pulled all the way until tension reached once I released my pedal.
     
  6. rhaudiogeek

    rhaudiogeek New User

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    Stringway: Stay Away from this Company

    I recently acquired a used Stringway 450 machine and my experiences have been very disappointing to say the least.

    Adding insult has been Fred Trimmer's disrespectful and personal attacks when confronted with issues using a product designed, manufactured and sold by Stringway.

    The machine in question supposedly carries a 10 year warranty, but for all practical purposes the "Warranty" is a joke.

    Think twice before buy any machine from this Company.

    I will post a video on YouTube that captures all of the issues that I have had so far. Very frustrating and a nightmare to say the least.

    None of these issue could have manifested due to any shipping damage. In fact who designs a product that is so sensitive and can't withstand even normal shipping torture.

    The machine in question does have an inherent defect maybe this particular lot and batch number had manufacturing issues during machining.

    Here are the key issues I have had and still continue to struggle with them:

    Issue 1:

    The inability of the turn-table to line up the clamps below the first two Mains is an absolute limitation. When you clamp the first two mains, the offset is almost close to an inch which severely limits the tension at which the the string can be set. The problem is very acute when stringing a 18 x 20 string pattern racquet. Even Fred (from Stringway) acknowledged the same in his email to me.

    Issues 2:

    The T98 clamping assembly that grabs the string moves by half an inch to an inch once the tension head is released. Most clamping mechanisms do exhibit some movement, but no to this extent.

    Issue # 3:

    When I received the stringing machine (with the clamps not mounted on the glide bar), the order of the assembly for how the glide bar was mounted to the turntable was as follows:

    Glide Bar
    Washer
    Allen Nut

    When I unscrewed the Allen Nut and slid the T98 clamps on to the glide bar, and reassembled it in the same order, the clamps would not glide through freely and would get stuck around the midway. Fred (stringway) wrote in his email that is the correct way of mounting the glide rail on to the turn table. However in this machine, it just does not work and the clamps are stuck along the midway.

    To overcome this problem I changed the order of assembly on how the glide bars are mounted to the turntable as follows:

    Washer
    Glide Bar
    Allen Nut

    Having done this I was able to move the T98 clamps freely on the glide bar without any issues and could clamp it securely wherever i needed to. But Fred has been evasive on whether this has any ramifications on the overall stringing quality.

    Why should one spend their hard earned money with a company such as Stringway ?
     
  7. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,361
    I have table top ml90 type machine but turn table and clamps are very similar to your up right.
    On issue 1, do you pull first 2 mains on same side before starting mains on other side. I do this and have no problems with clamps aligning with strings. If you try to pull 1st 2 mains on alternating sides, the clamps will butt against one another and 2nd clamp will be forced out of alignment a bit. But, my work around is easy and causes no issue.

    On issue 2, I do get a small amount of clamp movement after release the tension head. The movement for me is minimal and it pulls out when you tension the next string. If you get good alignment of the clamp teeth and base under the string, movement is minimized but I usually get some movement. Again, not an issue for me as resulting string job is good and very consistent string to string.

    Issue 3 is a bummer. I cannot help you help. My clamps slide and position well on the glide bar. Sounds like you have a defect or assembly problem.

    Too bad you are not getting good support from Stringway.
     
  8. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Thanks for sharing your experiences on this forum, and I'm sorry to hear you are having issues. Hopefully those who participate in this forum can provide some feedback and possible solutions for you. Here are my thoughts based upon what info you have provided thus far.

    I obviously cannot comment on your interaction, but this has not been my experience at all with Mr. Timmer.

    I am not certain, but is the warranty transferable to a second owner? Is it the sliding of the clamps what you wish to have addressed under warranty?

    I can understand your frustration, and it is always good to conduct due diligence before making such a purchase. There are a number of very happy Stringway customers, and regardless of manufacturer or machine model, there unfortunately are always some users who experience issues and concerns.

    Yes, please post the video so those in this forum have a better understanding of your issues and can hopefully provide some good feedback for you.

    I'm a bit confused on this one. First you indicate no issues could have occurred during shipping, then you imply the product is too sensitive to withstand shipping.

    Is this inherent defect the same as the issues you reference?

    Issue 1:
    The advice from TennisCJC is good. Most of us have the same turntable and clamping system as you without the electronics, so seeing what you are doing will be helpful for suggestions.

    Issues 2:
    The Stringway user manual recommends you push the clamp in the direction opposite the tension head before clamping off to reduce drawback. To do this with the T98, clamp off the string first, then push the base toward the tension head before clamping it off. I do this and it works well. Here is a screen capture from the manual: [​IMG] While the pics show the T92 clamps, the process I mentioned above works for the T98s.

    Issue # 3:
    I would presume that mounting the clamps to the glide bar as recommended by the manufacturer is best. If it is not working well that way, there is some other issue. Did the seller mention anything regarding this? Have you asked them what they did? If there was ever any damage? If you are not already doing so, make sure you move the clamps along the rail by grabbing the base and not any further up on the clamping mechanism. (See the same diagram from the manual referenced above.) Also, if you have not done so, clean the rails thoroughly with mineral spirits and then spray them with silicone. I purchased used and once I cleaned the rails, the clamps slid beautifully...even better with silicone.

    I can certainly understand that a manufacturer cannot fully endorse assembly/operation of their product when it is done differently than designed, nor predict the associated results.

    I have been extremely pleased with my investment in Stringway. Even though I am the third owner, it functions just as I expected it would, and for me it is money well-spent. I know you are likely not looking for additional expense, but if you believe your issues with the fixed clamps cannot be resolved, you may want to consider flying clamps. I purchased them, and depending on the situation use exclusively the fixed clamps, exclusively the flying, or a combination of the two.

    Post that video and hopefully the members here can share some great ideas to get you on track.
     
  9. BlxTennis

    BlxTennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2010
    Messages:
    338
    I agree with 10SDad. When I got my Laserfibre MS200, I got a lot of help from Fred and he had been very helpful. He had gone as far as creating drawings just for my scenarios to help me out on my new machine which was about 10yrs old. He was answering my emails through out the day which was weird since he's in Europe and I am in US.
     
  10. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,087
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    This will not work if you push on the top of the clamp, unless the base locks when pushing on the top.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2013
  11. rhaudiogeek

    rhaudiogeek New User

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
  12. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Thanks for posting the pics and video.

    If "Issue 1" is referring to the position of the clamp prior to clamping off the string (Issue 1: The inability of the turn-table to line up the clamps below the first two Mains is an absolute limitation. When you clamp the first two mains, the offset is almost close to an inch which severely limits the tension at which the the string can be set.), your picture shows the clamp center being 3/8" from the string, not 1", unless you mean the distance between the two center strings once both are clamped off.

    Following is a pic of my two clamps centered as if under the first two mains. It will give you an idea how close to center they should be. I do experience a very slight offset when the first main is tensioned, but not what your pics indicate.

    [​IMG]

    Keep in mind that by putting the washer between post and the glide bar instead of outside of the glide bar, you have effectively increased the offset you describe by moving the clamps farther out from center. You should still have plenty of clearance between the turntable and the clamp base with the washer on the outside as designed. Below is a pic of my machine showing that gap.

    [​IMG]

    In your video your clamp base seems to be moving a bit as well. I'm assuming you have adjusted the base as well to ensure it is clamping tightly to the glide bar? Also, do you leave the turntable free when you tension, or do you have it locked?
     
  13. rhaudiogeek

    rhaudiogeek New User

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    Thank you for posting the pics of your glide bars and the T98 clamps, give me a good reference as to what a smoothly operating machine should look like.

    That is what my contention has been along with Stringway and Fred. However acknowledgement that a manufacturing defect exists is far and away.

    Yes I have adjusted the base clamp so that it clamps as securely as possible to the glide bar when locked.

    Below are pictures of my machine, as you can see the clearance at center of the glide rail is barely enough for the clamps to move freely. This is with the washer mounted on the inside (i am aware this is not how it was designed to operate).

    But like I have mentioned in my post earlier with the washer mounted on the outside the clamps get stuck at the centre of the glide rail.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  14. rhaudiogeek

    rhaudiogeek New User

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    Forgot to clarify NO I don't lock the turn table.
     
  15. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    The base of the T92 clamps shown in the diagram DO lock when the top is pushed. The T98, which is the one being discussed, has a base that must be manually locked.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2013
  16. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    rhaudiogeek, I looked at your photos/video closely and I see one major issue that is contributing to your problem both in the picture and the video. Neither racquet appears to be centered on the mounts, especially at the throat where you have the string clamped off. That is increasing the offset between where the string is exiting the first grommet and where the clamp can reach. Your first two mains grommets need to be completely centered both at the head and throat for proper string pulling and clamping. Doing that should help resolve what you are dealing with. If the racquet was centered to begin with but moved during tensioning, then you need to clamp the racquet down more tightly.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  17. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    6,721
    That was pointed out in his other thread here: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=473749

    At the risk of cross-pollination, I should note that looking at his pics, there seems to be an issue with his teflon (?) roller. One of his rollers seems to be offset/shifted upwards as compared to yours, 10SDad. Your roller seems to be lying on the turn table and keeping the clamp even. Do you think you can find an exploded assembly diagram for rhaudiogeek?

    rhaudiogeek, I'd also take a look at the drill pattern on the glide rail. Is it perfectly symmetrical? If not, it's possible you have it flipped. I would assume it's symmetrical, but if it's not, that's one thing you can check. This might also explain the sticking in the center of the turn table, but since I don't own the MS200TT anymore, I can't be of too much help...

    I'd investigate and make sure your clamps are operating symmetrically.
     
  18. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    My apologies for the duplication...wasn't aware of that separate post.

    While I did not locate an exploded diagram, I did find the following diagrams which show some detail.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I can also provide the following information regarding adjustment/reseating of the guide rails. Since they are epoxied into position it is possible that impact on them from the machine or turntable being dropped, poor packaging during shipping, or another mishap can push them out of position. Here are the recommended steps to address a guide rail that is out of alignment.

    The depth of the pins can be adjusted using the following method. Unscrew one end of the rail, leaving the other end fastened. Then use the guide rail to rotate the fastened end to loosen the pin so it can be removed. Follow the same procedure to remove the other pin. Then reattach the guide rail with the pins by doing the following:
    1) Remove the old epoxy and thoroughly clean the pins.
    2) Bolt the pins to the guide rail but do not fully tighten the bolts so that the pin can still move slightly.
    3) Insert epoxy glue into the holes in the main turntable beam and distribute the epoxy internally using one of the pins.
    4) Add epoxy around the end of the pins.
    5) Insert the pins into the main turntable beam.
    6) IMPORTANT: Position the guide rail a distance of 66 mm from the center of the beam and 132 mm between the rails. (Note: A piece of stiff cardboard can be used to make a template prior to starting the process. See pic in next post of the T92 rails being aligned.)
    7) Ensure the rail is supported in the correct position.
    8) Allow 24 hrs. for the epoxy to harden.
    9) Tighten pins to rail.

    I am happy to assist how I can, and that is in part what this club was created to do. I do want to reference, however, that some of the comments put forward during this and the other forum discussion have been strongly accusational, assuming, insulting, and I believe unfair towards Stringway. I am the third owner of my Stringway, and I fully expected I would have to tweak or replace some things, which I did. These issues were not a fault of the machine, but simply due to previous use, wear, and transportation. I had not used the machine before I picked it up three hours away, and while the seller gave me a brief overview, I had no way of knowing if there was something that would cause major problems. That was part of the chance I took purchasing used, and fortunately everything that needed repair I could get the parts for and do myself.

    People who purchase this level of electronic machine new are not typically inexperienced stringers, nor are they individuals who spend that amount of money and not recognize and address a manufacturing issue such as is being implied here. Certainly this deficiency would have been dealt with by the original owner if it was delivered to him/her in that condition, and would not be used for years in that deficient state. And if it were a manufacturing "batch" issue, there would be more complaints specific to this problem, and Stringway would already have a mechanism in place to take care of it under warranty. IMHO the more likely case is that there was some type of impact to the guide rails during shipping/transport.

    Please know that my intent and those on this forum as well as the other forum referenced by Diredesire is to share information and provide assistance. Responding to those who are trying to do just that...those to whom the OP came seeking assistance...by negatively referencing them as members of the "Stringway Fanboys club", especially when the OP was admittedly incorrect about what was being challenged, will cause any support to quickly fade.

    I sourced the diagrams from Stringway, and in the course of that communication learned that rather than placing blame they have generously offered to provide a solution to the OP. I trust when that is completed, the OP will acknowledge that here and in the other forums as well in fairness to Stringway and those who have provided good feedback.
     
  19. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Here is the template pic. Keep in mind, this demonstrates the T92, not the T98, but the method is obviously the same.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    6,721
    I actually find it interesting that a template even exists/is required. The assembly of the glide rails and clamps seems to be relatively bulletproof to me... Unless there's asymmetrical holes in the glide rails for the DA clamps, that is.

    Thanks for the technical drawings. If I were rhaudiogeek, I'd be looking closely at the bottom assembly of the clamp (T97/T99) and also the interface between T89 and "gaffel." His clamp seems to be tilted, which does indeed indicate shipping damage, IMO.
     
  21. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1,572
    Is the Stringway Tension Advisor 2 piece the preferred method for those with Stringwa

    Stringway Tension Advisor...

    http://www.stringway-nl.com/en/TAonline/calc.php

    I have seen that with some racquets, there's some deforming/elongation while the crosses are tensioned so that at the end of the string job, some of the inside supports are no longer making close/tight contact with the frame.
     
  22. wb145

    wb145 New User

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    rhaudiogeek,

    I had the same issue on my ML120 that I bought new. Check the angle between the vertical posts that the clamps slide down and the horizontal piece it is mounted into. On my machine both T98 clamps were not 90 degress but more like 80 degrees. In other words, tilted away from the center and that was the reason the clamps would not grab the center mains. Both Clamps were replaced by the USA reps. I'll try to post a pic.

    Wb145
     
  23. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Messages:
    3,089
    This thread reminds me of Ikea's "hall of shame" as-is area.

    In most Ikea stores there is an area with a bunch of used furniture for
    sale. Most of it looks like it was assembled incorrectly and then maybe
    partially smashed (in frustration?). Basically major fails by the customer.

    The customers probably marched back into the store complaining
    that the product is defective, etc. and demanding a refund.

     
  24. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1,572
    Cleaning T98 Clamps...

    I noticed recently that when I go to higher tensions that my T98 base clamps slip a bit. It does not slip/slide on the rail... it rotates around the base. Maybe some lube got on the base in the pad/brake material... Anyway if I tighten the bolt on the bottom of the base clamp, the clamp lever does not "latch" or click into place. So I took it apart (easy... just had to unscrew the lever and pop out the brass pin).

    Any tips on cleaning/lubing? I think the only part that actually needs to be lubed is the brass pin, correct? What's the recommended cleaning for the pad/brake? It needs to be smooth enough so the base rotates freely but "grip" well so it doesn't slip once the lever is latched.
     
  25. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,361
    eelhc,

    if you took the clamp completely apart, you can lube only the internal area/parts with a very small amount of white lithium lubricant available at homedepot or you local hardware store. Clean it first with rubbing alcohol.

    Don't lube any external parts including the clamp pads where they grab the string of the base where it grabs the slide rod. Just clean them with a little rubbing alcohol.
     
  26. rhaudiogeek

    rhaudiogeek New User

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    Folks,

    Thanks to all of you who took the time to correct, educate and share your collective wisdom in helping me on the issue with my Stringway ML 450.

    I was provided a replacement turntable (used) and brand new T98 clamps by Stringway. With the new setup I am able to string my racquets with the same level of consistency and predictability I am accustomed to.

    Here is the explanation provided by Stringway on why I faced the issues with the Stringway ML 450.

    “For the rails to be factory set, there must be 66mm from the center of the beam to the inner edge of the rail (132mm from inside edge to inside edge of each rail-however they must be centered).

    On the table received from you, the side with the blue tape measured 120mm across with 59mm on one side and 61mm on the other side. On the opposite side, there is 132mm across but 68mm on one side and 64 on the other side.

    What has happened is the pins have shifted, they are epoxied at the factory so that is what helps hold their positions. The cause could be that the machine was accidentally dropped, accidentally dropped during setup, accidentally dropped during shipping. Those are probably causes, no way I can determine how that happened. I doubt anyone would take a hammer and tap those pins into the beam :)


    While I am not surprised by the politically correct assessment where the blame is conveniently assigned to chance :) nevertheless all is well that ends well.

    Singing off for now......
     
  27. mad dog1

    mad dog1 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    4,867
    glad your issue has been resolved.

    sounds like you are skeptical the misalignment could have occurred as the the end result of mishandling during shipping? seriously, have you seen how UPS and FedEx throw boxes around? :shock: until you do, you might want to reserve judgement because if you've seen first hand how rough they are on boxes, you'd probably find SW's assessment quite plausible.
     
  28. v-verb

    v-verb Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2012
    Messages:
    2,077
    Location:
    Toronto
    I worked at UPS a few nights when I was in school in the 80's. We threw boxes. Including TV's. I asked about that and the answer is that if the contents weren't packed properly, too bad.
     
  29. rhaudiogeek

    rhaudiogeek New User

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    I only believe in facts not opinions :), perhaps a little background is called in for.

    The replacement turntable that was shipped to me was not even securely packaged and yet it seemed to have missed the same fate the plagued its predecessor.

    Just an FYI: The previous owner had packaged the old turntable so meticulously and thorough that even a thin glass vase would have escaped any shipping torture no matter how hard the fall.
     
  30. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1,572
    Does not surprise me at all... When I got my floating clamps (3 triples and a double) earlier this year. They just threw it in a box and shipped. No bubble wrap, packing foam... not even crumpled up newspaper. They rattled all the way from Texas to NY in the box. Good thing the clamps are built like tanks... no damage and they work fine. The same guy probably packed your turntable.
     
  31. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    6,721
    To be fair, though, if the gliderail posts were epoxied in, and they DID shift, they'd probably have some movement to them. Epoxy is pretty tough, but very brittle. I guess chalk it up to whatever you want, as long as the issue is fixed. Glad the issue has been resolved.
     
  32. Joonas

    Joonas Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    Costa del Sol, Spain
    I have got a question for you fellow Stringway users regarding stringing crosses and pull time.

    It has been my way of working to keep cross string under tension while weaving one ahead. I also release the clamp while tensioning and of course straighten the cross string under tension. By keeping this way I manage to deliver very even DTs (+- 0,2 cm/Nm).

    However some of my new clients have noticed that the stringbed done by me is lot tighter than the ones they used to get. I also verified the effect of quick pull, clamp and weave and at the end DTs dropped 1-1.5cm/Nm other things being equal. I have verified the tension accuracy of my ML100 and it is what it should be. I believe that your average stringers around are just doing job careless and deliver below par results.

    So how common is among SW users to pull crosses longer time e.g. while weaving next cross?

    I received today fixed clamp system T98 and it is tempting to try to speed up stringing crosses by coming down with two clamps and pulling shorter. With flying clamps this is obviously not good option as you end up loosing tension by bending strings with flying clamps. At the moment I do universal ATW roughly in 25 min. with flying clamps. The stringing time is not that important for me but it is just just one of those things that you end up measuring yourself against.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2013
  33. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Joonas: I can't speak to the commonality across SW users, but I always leave the cross under tension as I weave one ahead. What flying clamps are you using? I have the SW clamps (2 triple, 1 double) and I use them in combination with my T98s. I find the fixed clamps to be good for starting/ending, but use the flying for the remainder. I also use two clamps when stringing crosses and have found that to provide more consistency in my results.
     
  34. Joonas

    Joonas Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    Costa del Sol, Spain
    Thanks 10SDad for your feedback.

    I have been using Stringway flying clamps.Two double and one triple. Normally I use triple only in finishing two piece mains and to clamp two strings while stringing crosses on racquets with open string pattern. If I do universal ATW I go with two flying clamps and use the other one as a starting clamp on the first cross Same goes with starting the mains. My Gamma starting clamp just died but to be honest SW double flying clamp holds much better and clamps the string in longer area so it damages softer strings less.

    I will give my T98 fixed clamps a go today as the epoxy has dried. So let's see. Main reasons for me to upgrade to fixed clamps are:
    1. More convenient and quicker way to start mains. It is a comfort thing as I absolutely got consistent and good results with flying clamps.
    2. To be able clamp single cross while doing ATWs. Again not big problem with flying clamps but then again with fixed ones it is more convenient.
    3. To be able to come down with two clamps while stringing crosses
    4. I believe while doing two piece stringing at mains tie off I should lose less tension with fixed clamp than with even triple clamp. To be seen.
    5. Least important reason but some people (customers) look down to the flying clamps. Also on latest racket tech (ERSA Europe) magazine there were an article about stringing machines and clamping systems. They put down flying clamps in pretty ugly and ignorant way as a non-pro solution. It is sad as with SW flying clamps, by little thinking and with some experience you can really deliver strong and consistent results.
     
  35. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2010
    Messages:
    1,655
    I guess I'm in the club now. I just received my ML90. Although I haven't strung any racquets on it yet, I am very happy with the quality of this machine--it is very solid and smooth.

    However the directions that accompanied the machine were...um...horrible! I was able to assemble the machine just by looking at the various parts and figuring how they went together. I also found some documents and photos/vids online that also helped. I am a little unsure about how to mount racquets. I mean I think I know how the mounting system works, but there are a lot of moving parts and I would like some kind of instructions about how to adjust things properly.

    At any rate, it is a very cool machine and I am very happy to have it. But for $1,000 they could do MUCH better for instructions.
     
  36. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,361
    I have old LaserFibre which is almost identical to ML90. You should have the 5 point mounting system.

    Here's how I mount:
    1. put frame on mounting platforms and adjust distancing between the head and throat platforms. The knobs under the base allow you to loosen the top and bottom platform and make them fit snug for the racket you are mounting. Once you have this set for your racket, you don't have to do it again unless you string a different type frame.
    2. hold the racket down and raise the 2 outside white mounts for the throat with the thumb screws beneath the mounting platform. raise the mounts until the top of the mount is just beneath the grommets.
    3. finger tighten the 4 top arms that hold the racket down. I put the arms over the frame point inward toward the string bed.
    4. finger tighten the center white mount at the top.
    5. alternately finger tighten top 4 arms and the center top mount until racket is very tight. Obviously, you don't want to crush the frame but I use firm finger pressure to determine when tight enough.

    There should be no movement of the frame when finished if you try to wiggle it. all white plastic mounts - 3 at the head and 2 at the throat should be touching the frame. make sure the 2 at the throat are not bending or blocking grommets.

    Then you are good to go. I hope you enjoy your new machine. Mine is 7 years old and it is a great machine.
     
  37. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    I have the LaserFibre version of the ML100.

    TennisCJC has provided excellent instructions. My mounting is virtually the same except for a few things.

    Here's my routine.

    1. When I put the frame on the mounting platforms, I go ahead and place the top arms over and tighten just enough to keep the racquet down. This is done by turning the knobs gently until they first stop. I want them to hold the racquet down, but still allow movement for Step 3 below. I like to put the arms at the throat over the throat pieces (angling toward the hoop) rather than over the hoop. While this makes it a bit more challenging to get one of the mains started on each side, the benefit is that it provides me with a better ability to clamp off the last crosses as well as the mains going through the area where arms would be.
    2. I adjust the two inside throat mounts/Babolat mount as TennisCJC described.
    3. Leaving the tower at the head securely tightened, I pull the tower at the throat opposite from the head to ensure the racquet is fully seated against the white inside mounts. While keeping good pressure on the tower with one hand, I tighten the tower and secure it in place. (This seems to help avoid issues with elongating of the head/movement away from mounts when pulling crosses.) (NOTE: If you don’t have the arms in place as outlined in Step 1 above, it will be hard to keep the racquet in place when pulling on the tower.)
    4. Then I fully tighten the top arms in an “X” pattern: e.g.: 10 o’clock, 4 o’clock, 2 o’clock, 8 o’clock. I personally crank them down very tight.
    5. Then I tighten the white center mount at the top of the racquet head.

    For removing the racquet, I loosen the white top center inside mount, loosen the arms up just enough to relieve pressure, then untighten the tower at the throat. This allows the racquet to “relax” and makes it easier to finish untightening the top arms. Sometimes the arms at the throat need a little tap from the bottom to be fully released.

    Hope that helps.

    Welcome to the club!
     
  38. Darkhors

    Darkhors Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Location:
    The D
    Add me to the group. I've been stringing with my ML100 w/t92 clamps for about 5 years. I absolutely love my machine. It's super easy to use, clean and delivers consistent results for me time and time again.

    I would love to get the concorde system for it because of the many racquets that start the mains at the top, but other than that it's been flawless. I will definitely have this machine for many, many more years to come, even if I buy an electronic machine.

    DH
     
  39. Gut4Tennis

    Gut4Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    2,293
    Location:
    Tennis Court
    just ordered the 1 x Stringway Triple + Double Flying Clamp Special = $97.20

    I have a crappy drop weight, and these clamps will be worth more then my stringer lol
     
  40. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    I think you'll like them. When I travel I take my Klippermate as my ML100 would take too much space, but I still use my SW flying clamps and get great results. Nothing beats them in my opinion for their ability to adjust quickly, hold well, and not damage strings.
     
  41. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    New Stringlab 2

    FYI to interested Stringway owners. The new Stringlab 2 is in their latest newsletter. The unit measures both SBS and racquet stiffness.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  42. dodgers

    dodgers New User

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    81
    Location:
    Texas
    Lets hope its not like the Stringlab 1. It was a total waste of my money. It never worked, showing an error 99% of the time when taking a measurement. When it did take a measurement it was not consistent.
    This new Stringlab 2 looks expensive, hope it works and you don't loose your money.
     
  43. JasperJ

    JasperJ New User

    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    I've got a question about the correct way to install the weight.

    If you look at pictures of Stringway machines on the internet you'll notice that some have the small bit of the weight (with the screw) at the bottom and others have it at the top.

    On the official Stringway website (that thing could use an update...) most pictures have the screw near the bottom, so I assume this is the 'correct' position of the weight?
     
  44. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    No right or wrong here. Where you place the knob/screw will not have a big influence on the tension, but keeping the knob/screw at the bottom...or nearest the tensioner...allows for placement of the weight closer to the end of the scale with the ability to still clamp it.
     
  45. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Sorry to hear you had issues with the Stringlab 1.

    As I understand it, the big difference between the Stringlab 1 and the Stringlab 2 is the methodology of the evaluation. Stringlab 1 generates a series of vibrations on the stringbed, measures the corresponding frequencies, and calculates the String Bed Stiffness based on the average. If the vibration is not strong enough for some reason and the tool can't generate enough values, it throws an error.

    The Stringlab 2 mechanically deflects the stringbed and measures the force needed for that deflection. Results are displayed as Dynamic Tension or kg/cm. This should be a reliable method, as it is more physical in nature, and follows the same approach as the proven Babolat RDC.
     
  46. JasperJ

    JasperJ New User

    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    Good to know, thanks!
     
  47. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2010
    Messages:
    1,655
    On the ML90/100, why can't the turntable turn 360º. I see there is a bolt & bushing below the TT that prevents this, but I can't see any function for this bushing other than to prevent the TT from turning 360º. Can someone 'splain this to me? Thanks.
     
  48. mad dog1

    mad dog1 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    4,867
    to keep the tension head closer to the same level as the racquet stringbed. by keeping the string at the same level as the tension head there's less tension loss due to string to grommet friction as a result of the string being pulled down at an angle so the resulting string job is closer to the reference tension.

    i'm guessing your next question is going to be, "why can't you just bump up the reference tension to compensate for the tension loss due to friction?"
     
  49. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    There is a small black stop that is mounted to the surface of the frame, designed to keep the racquet handle from hitting the tension head. As Mad_Dog1 indicated, because the racquet is mounted at the height it is in relation to the tension head the racquet handle does not allow 360 degree rotation even if the stop is removed.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  50. TfReAk

    TfReAk Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Messages:
    164
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    I have a ML90 on the way. I hope it will arrive this week :) Can't wait to string on it. Ordered 1x double and 2x triple clamps :D
     

Share This Page