Switch To A Lighter Racket

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by tennisnut09, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. tennisnut09

    tennisnut09 Rookie

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    Need your help please. I am currently using a 90 sq, 12.5 oz (350 gram) 16X19 racket and thinking about switching to a lighter 90 sq, 11.8 oz (330 gram) 16X19 racket or a 95 sq, 11.5 oz (320 gram) 16X18 racket. Can you tell me what will happen/impact to my serve/strokes/volley....and my game overall. Thanks!
     
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  2. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    That will depend a lot on the racket you are using and also on the swingweight. Just because the weight of the racket goes down does not mean the swing weight will go down.

    Irvin
     
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  3. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    Yep. I'm in the process of switching (again) from the AeroStorm to the Prince Exo3 Tour Team. The racquet's weight is down 2 ounces from my old C10, but the swingweight (according to nlbwell) is equal to that of the POG.

    With this frame, so far, I've seen no degradation in my strokes. What I have seen is a more user friendly platform which enables me to get more racquet head speed off the ground.
     
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  4. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    If you're just hurtin' for a less hefty option, it may feel like your game has been set free with the right racquet.

    I've been using heavier gear for a long time and despite some stuff I've tried, I just can't get cozy with anything lighter than 12.5 oz. and at least 9 or so points HL. Strokes can hold up alright if the lighter alternative is comfortable enough when taking full swipes at the ball, but I go to the net a lot and hate the loss of stability and authority I prefer to have up front when my frame is too light. I usually feel as though I have less energy on tap for generating pace or spin on my serves as well. That's me and what I'm used to, though.

    If you haven't really experimented with many racquets yet, don't be surprised if you feel a whole lot better playing with a frame that's only a couple tenths of an ounce lighter than what you've been using for a while. Having most of that stability, etc., along with just a little less of a cumbersome feel to bog you down might be just the ticket.
     
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  5. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    If you go to the lighter weight, you will likely need less HL racket to increase SW on the lighter frame. SW is critical to plow, power, stability, swing speed, feel and comfort. I just dropped from a 12.5 oz racket with 95 sq", 8 pts HL, and SW 338 to 11.8 oz, 98 sq", 4 pts HL, and SW 335. I am still adjusting to the lighter weight and different balance but think I am going to like it. I am adding lead to configure it the way I want and am close to final customization.

    You will have less power and stability if you drastically drop the SW. You will get a little more power from the longer strings in the 95 or 98 vs the 90 sq" head, but SW is critical. I suggest you keep you SW within 5-10 grams of your heavier racket. When testing the lighter racket, it may feel good when you have an easy ball and lots of time to setup and generate a fast swing speed. But, does it feel as good when blocking big serves, or volleying hard hit passing shots, or when using a defensive squash shot from the corner, or when returning heavy deep groundstrokes. Light SW rackets usually suffer in these areas as they don't have the plow and stability to handle pace, to volley well, or to play defense.

    Keep your SW high but not so high that you cannot generate good swingspeed when you have time to drive a shot.

    Hi SW is also the best on your arm as the racket is much more stable and absorbs much more shock.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2011
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  6. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Great point there by T-CJC about being especially critical of what a lighter racquet does with "blocked shots" including some returns of serve.

    Along those same lines, also pay attention to how that frame delivers when hitting a slice. I have that style of shot as an option on both sides, but even if you only occasionally slice your backhand, make sure that a lighter racquet can still get something behind the ball for that shot. Racquet speed is not a factor for some shots, including a slice with a firm wrist (the "squash shot" forehand slice is more of a swipe at the ball). The racquet's mass has a larger effect on the shots with less speed of swing.
     
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  7. tennisnut09

    tennisnut09 Rookie

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    Thanks you all for the advice
     
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  8. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I dropped 2 oz, can beat lower level players more consistently and easier, but might have trouble beating guys a level above me (talking individual points, obviously I"m gonna lose to a 5-5.5).
    I can replicate my normal shots much easier and more often, but maybe my best shots aren't quite as penetrating against fast movers who can also hit more consistent than me.
    Tentative, I'm a gonner against an equal or better player.
     
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  9. tennisnut09

    tennisnut09 Rookie

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    I love my racket. The reason that I want to switch to a lighter racket because when I play for 2 hours or more, I start getting a little bit late on my strokes. I am 44 and 5'.8.
     
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  10. kaiser

    kaiser Semi-Pro

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    I doubt very much whether that's a good reason to switch to a lighter racket. When you go for a lighter racket, you have to up your swingspeed and as the work (kinetic energy) required to swing your racket goes up with the square of your swingspeed, you are not likely to save a lot of energy when going for a lighter racket... Are you sure you're not getting late on your strokes because your legs are wearing out after 2 hours of play? That's what happens to me, I'm 55 and swing a 360 g racket, and when I get tired I fail to get my feet in position in time and therefore end up being late for my swing, not because my arm is getting too tired to simply swing the stick itself...
     
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  11. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    The differences you'll notice are: 1)You'll probably get more power. 2) The ball will leave your racket at a higher trajectory, 3) You'll get more spin, 4) You'll have less control on groundstrokes & volleys, 5) You'll break more strings. There are always tradeoffs.
     
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  12. rst

    rst Rookie

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    When you go for a lighter racket, you have to up your swingspeed and as the work (kinetic energy) required to swing your racket goes up with the square of your swingspeed,.............

    what does that mean then between a 12.8 ounce racket and a 10.8 ounce racket each with equal balance??

    would it take much more energy then to get the 10.8 oz racket to 27mph than to get the 12.8 oz rackert to 25mph??
     
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  13. rst

    rst Rookie

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    you are not likely to save a lot of energy when going for a lighter racket... ......


    that really shouldnt matter should it if you actually get the racket to the ball the way you want, right??
     
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  14. rst

    rst Rookie

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    You will have less power and stability if you drastically drop the SW.............

    is stablity a partial function of quickly getting the racket head in place for the desired shot......can lighter SW achieve that??
     
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  15. martini1

    martini1 Hall of Fame

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    Well, if the two sticks are exactly the same spec except the weight difference, I guess you will be less power, won't you? Unless you compensate by swinging faster than normal.

    If the swing is not change, RHS is similar, the swing would feel lighter.

    If the lighter racket is more powerful, then you can save the energy on brushing more on contact. That means more spin but the ball could still have enough forward momentum. But all these is based on the lighter racket is more powerful.
     
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  16. rst

    rst Rookie

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    There are always tradeoffs.


    unless the racket swithc is beneficial to ones game.
     
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  17. T.P3D0R

    T.P3D0R Rookie

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    Definitely trade offs. I miss the heavier frames I used to play with. Lighter frames have easy power & spin, but the accuracy and precision of heavier, smaller head-sized frames is hard to come by. I'm trying not to transition back to them..
     
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  18. rst

    rst Rookie

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    i dont think trade offs are a definite...maybe you just havent or cant find the racket that works best for you.
     
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