switched to semi-western from full western....

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by finchy, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    and it feels great! just letting you know, if you are having problems with a full western grip, try semi. i had big problems like when i hit the ball, the would fall straight to the ground and not even go over the net with full western. now with a semi, i can brush the ball up more and go through the ball easier allowing for more penatrating topspin drives. as some of you know, i wanted to model my forehand after ferrero, but that has changed. in fact, i think my forehand looks alot more like federer's! lol.

    well, this is just a heads up for those having problems with a full western grip. take semi-western out for a spin (no pun intended) and see how it plays.
     
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  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Professional

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    Watch Ferrero, he doesn't always use a western grip, especially at wimbledon
     
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  3. TwistServe

    TwistServe Guest

    If you're using a western and the ball is goin down or into the net, your swing path isn't correct. Some guys in my group class saw my western forehand and they really liked it. They asked the coach to show it to them.. THe first 20 balls they hit went straight down. (Pretty tough switching from eastern to western). If you correct the swing path it'll go over the net, and with a western grip you want to give the ball more height over the net.

    Pros switch grips depending on the ball depth, spin, and what they're trying to do with the ball.
     
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  4. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    yea, low balls were murder to me before. i did correct my swingpath eventually though. the ball only went down when i started using a full western.

    it just took alot more energy for me to swing like that though. i had to bend my knees alot more to get beneath the ball. and i wouldnt get enough pace or depth on the ball either.
     
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  5. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    The full western is great for high balls, but if you plan on taking a trajectory other than than down, semi-western is the way to go for topspin. Keep in mind that you can topspin with the racquet facing down(western), angled(semi-western), open faced(eastern forehand), even with the racquet turned up(lob grip), so stop looking for a full western to generate more topspin, it's a low to high motion except on high balls.
     
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  6. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    actually, the reason why i wanted to use a full western was to add that extra high kick after the ball hits the ground.

    but yea, i get your point. i wasnt swinging correctly at the ball. :oops:
     
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  7. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Nothing to get red about, finchy, many players think that topspin can't be done with an open faced racquet, but that's just a misconception. They start overcompensating by turning the head too far down and consequently can't get the ball over the net.
     
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  8. troytennisbum

    troytennisbum Rookie

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    i love the western grip for hard courts.

    I've gone the other way.
    I learned the forehand with eastern.....then I progressed
    to the semi-western...and now I am using a western grip.

    I have found that the Western
    grip is without question the best grip for my topspin forehand
    on the hardcourts.

    Because of my short stature (5'6 for a guy) the eastern grip just was not practical for me. The strike zone for an eastern forehand
    ,at waist level, was just to low on today's hardcourts. The eastern
    gave me no leverage for any ball above my waist.

    The only disadvantage i've read regarding this grip is that low balls
    are problematic for the Western. Personally, I have not found this
    to be the case. I think there are two reasons for this. Number one, I am short for a guy (at 5'6). Number two, I have no problem
    bending at the knees and I am flexible at the hips. So I would
    recommend this grip for any guy who is kind of short and flexible.
    On the other hand I can see how this grip could be problematic for
    really tall guys and/or for guys who are not that flexible at the
    knees and hips.

    Also, and i know this is a minority
    point of view, I've found that I like hitting lower bouncing balls
    with the Western. The extra spin potential that this grip affords,
    makes it easier for me to "work" the ball up and over the net.
     
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  9. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    A low sliced ball is extremely difficult to get over the net with a full western grip. I use a continental to scoop up very low balls and found that it works great for hitting angles too. Full western is great for high balls, but I'm definitely not convinced that it's a good grip to handle low balls.
     
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  10. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    one of my classmates likes to hit flat hard forehands that barely bounce above your knees though. thats what i will be having trouble with.
     
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  11. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    I'd slice those balls and watch him try to return that because he'll be guessing where the ball's gonna bounce. If he volleys, just lob the ball over his head, otherwise, it looks like a perfect slice opportunity.
     
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  12. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    no, this guy is an idiot. he will just slice it back to me on the baseline. i saw him play a guy who sliced, and all he did was slice back. he barely comes to the net for volley. he just is a pure baseliner.
     
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  13. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Playing a western grip on a low ball is difficult. I've gotten away with a semi-western at times, but it's incosistent at best. I'd go with a continental grip flat shot, or an eastern forehand flat shot, if you don't want to go with the slice. I can't guarantee you'll get the EF shot in play, but the continental flat shot will definitely work.
     
    #13
  14. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    i tried playing with continental in my groundstrokes and it doesnt feel right. in your sense, i cannot find the correct swingpath with that grip. im too used to western.
     
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  15. C_Urala

    C_Urala Semi-Pro

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    I think that western grip is problematic not for low balls but for balls that are hit late. If you meet balls well in front of you, you can succesively hit a ball about a knee high. (the lower balls will be difficult, I admit). But if you are late, then even the ball at the hight of your waist will go down and to the right.
     
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