Switching sides?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by backhand, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. backhand

    backhand Rookie

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    Middle aged, getting ready to come back to the game after a three year hiatus for r wrist ligament surgery, major r shoulder impingement. Wrist from tennis, shoulder not. Have done all the PT that exists, hit the gym most days. Need strategic advice. Short story:

    Started playing in high school in the 70's. By twenty years ago was a practice partner for a woman who played a satellite tour; she said I had a pro level forehand, decent amateur volley and BH, the rest "needed work." Ten years ago I was still old school SV with a PS 85, eastern forehand, OH BH, 4.0 ranking, going nowhere. Five years ago, down to 3.0, started lessons to develop modern style, more all court game. Various sticks including Gen 1, 6.1 95, i Radical. Then the injuries. Wrist can still produce discomfort, but is as good as it'll get without more surgery. Shoulder is OK, but prone to re-injury if I push it. So two major questions:

    First, from other threads it seems that heavier, headlight racquets that are good for wrists (and elbows) may not be good for shoulders. In your opinions is this accurate?

    Second, I'm facing either a radical change of style (again), toward a short old-guy swing with a power stick, or switching orientation. No, not that way. Going lefty. I was ambidextrous as a kid, can still write decently with my left hand. Both my injuries are on my right side. So thinking that with a good ball machine and some patience, I could change to a left forehand, two-handed right backhand (which feels natural, like a baseball grip), and (perhaps) figure out a left handed serve. Any thoughts on this decision?
     
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  2. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    While light rackets can certainly take its toll on shoulders as well as elbows and wrists, heavier (11-12 oz), headlight rackets do not appear to bother my ailing shoulder (very limited external rotation with a bit of shoulder flexion weakness).

    You might try some of the Prince SpeedPort rackets. I recently had great results with the SpeedPort Black. It weighed in around 11.5 oz and is spec'd at 5 pts headlight. Even tho' its swingweight is up around 327 (according to TW), it swings like a much lighter racket due to the aerodynamics of the SpeedPort technology. This racket had an unexpected wealth of power even tho' its Power Level is in the low-medium range. I normally stay away from power rackets since they usually make depth control, especially on groundstrokes, too much of a challenge. This is the only racket that I've tried that could generate significant power with amazing control. Power & control no longer seemed to be mutually exclusive with this racket. My ability to generate topspin with this racket seemed unreal.

    The SpeedPort Tour is slightly heavier and a tad more headlight. Control was good for me but I was not able to generate as much power with this racket. The 2 SpeedPort White versions are spec'd at 11.2 and 11.7 oz and are only slightly headlight. The Power Level on these 2 rackets are little bit higher than the Black.

    Even if you don't end up converting to using your left arm for tennis, I believe it is certainly worth the effort to develop a lefty serve and g'strokes as a back up measure. If nothing else, it is great for brain development. Since it sounds like you already have some decent coordination in your left arm, you should be able to develop some of the strokes reasonably well with it. Writing with your left hand might not be that helpful, but if you can learn to throw (overhand) reasonably well, it could help you develop a lefty serve.
     
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  3. backhand

    backhand Rookie

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    Interesting advice, SA; will try some left handed throwing and keep the Princes in mind. I demoed the O3 Tour three years ago, loved the quickness and spin potential, but had a hard time with the everywhere/nowhere sweetspot.
     
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  4. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Altho' I've tried the SpeedPort Tour for about 20 minutes, I never got a chance to check out the older Prince O3 Tour. Exactly what do you mean by your characterization of the sweetspot?

    I am primarily a lefty,especially for racket sports, but have thrown right-handed since I was a wee lad. I'm certain that this helped me to develop a right-handed tennis serve more easily. To develop your lefty serve, you might try the racket throwing as shown on FYB:

    fuzzyyellowballs.com/index.php?id=416273&col=260823&offset=6
     
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  5. xnarek

    xnarek Rookie

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    SystemicAnomaly , you know a lot.
     
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