Switching to a "Player's Racquet"

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by mbm0912, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. mbm0912

    mbm0912 Professional

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    982
    I recently made the switch from a light OS "tweener" racquet to a PK Ki5 315, mainly for arm issues. I didn't demo this racquet like I probably should have, but I'm hoping to develop better groundstrokes based on the 315's higher demand for a solid hit. Especially when it warms up a bit, I will try to play a few times a week. Will moving to a players racquet typically facilitate improvement, or should I have looked for a more arm-friendly tweener? My forehand and volleys are struggling a bit with the new stick compared to the the old one.
     
    #1
  2. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    Messages:
    4,451
    Location:
    Michigan
    You wil get used to the smaller head and sweet spot and you will be happy you switched. Pk supposedly makes incredibly arm friendly rackets, so I wouldn't worry about that. Do you like the way it looks and feels?
     
    #2
  3. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,110
    Stick with it. You'll get used to it and get better.
     
    #3
  4. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    13,898
    Location:
    Atlanta GA
    This topic is covered "ad naseaum" if you search the forum you will find many varying opinions on this. But a racquet itself cannot "force you" to move better or help you to develop better groundstrokes. Those things are independent of the racquet. But as long as the racquet isn't slowing your development or hurting your overall game too much (winning is fun too!) then don't worry about it. IT's really all about whatever gives you the most enjoyment, unless of course you are planning on joining the ATP Tour :)
     
    #4
  5. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    19,537
    Location:
    Central Florida
    It will take some time for your muscles to develop and wield the heavier stick. If you start having shoulder problems on serves, then you may need to lighter.
     
    #5
  6. kazamzaa

    kazamzaa Rookie

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Location:
    Finland
    I just bought the same racquet. Because of arm issues also. I've read good reviews about it. Haven't played yet. I come from bio 200, so I move to a less of a "players frame". If you are a male between 14-65 years you will adapt to your PK in no time. It would also give you more control than your OS so that you can develop your swings fully.
     
    #6
  7. sundaypunch

    sundaypunch Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,640
    I agree with this 100%.

    A demanding racquet doesn't make you a better player. Proper footwork, preparation, etc. is what will make you hit the ball cleanly. You aren't going to magically start doing this because you are hitting a heavy racquet with a small head. It will be through many hours of practice to improve.

    Yes, there are a lot of hacks with bad form playing light, oversize racquets. The people that tell you how a players racquet will force you to improve forget that, 40 years ago, there were just as many hacks playing heavy wood racquets - they didn't morph into great players because of their demanding racquets.

    Use whatever gives you the best results.
     
    #7
  8. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2012
    Messages:
    3,008
    using heavy player's racquets actually make it harder for you to do the right thing at the right time for the entirety of a 2 hour match.

    With heavy players frames, in order to generate the pace that is necessary to win the match, you may have to swing the racquet pretty darn fast -- faster than say a stiff tweener, in order to achieve the same result. You have to ask yourself: can you keep swinging that heavy players frame nice and fast, with proper technique, for a 2 hour match? Or will you grow tired, your arm lazy, and start having more UEs because your technique became sloppy?

    Federer can swing his heavy player frame at break-neck speeds for the entirety of a match because he's trained to do so. But for us mere mortals, sometimes its easier and more efficient to use a lightweight, head-light, stiff tweener that's easier to wield and won't tire us out. We can swing at a medium pace instead of a fast pace and consistently keep the ball at a high velocity for a two hour match.

    For some people (including myself), I play great with a player's stick for about 45 min, then I just get too tired. I can't swing the thing fast enough anymore, so my balls slow down big time and people find it very easy to kill all my shots. Or, my technique gets sloppy and I start launching the balls because I don't have the energy to do a full WW finish in order to keep the ball in play.

    Just something to think about.
     
    #8
  9. Boricua

    Boricua Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    3,084
    There are lighter player's rackets around that are easier to handle when getting tired.. I am getting the Yonex VCore 97, 310 version. That is an example.
     
    #9
  10. mbm0912

    mbm0912 Professional

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    982
    I do! It is very comfortable and I think it will allow me to play much more than the racquet I had before. I've played with it a few times now, but not regularly because of the temps. I think it's a very good looking stick also.
     
    #10
  11. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,329
    The PK 5G Classic is one of best light players frames out there. The Ki5 and all the others in that series have a higher SW and are harder to get around. Depending on your age... your skill level and how much time you have to improve.. I would find a frame that give the best chance to win and have fun. All this stuff about using a players frame to improve only makes sense if you have the physical skills to handle the frame. Otherwise you will handicap yourself and will lose..and not enjoy tennis. Unless you have fast hands, good footwork, you are in better than ave shape and lots of time on your hands.. pick the frame that makes sense and go out and play.
     
    #11
  12. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    Messages:
    4,451
    Location:
    Michigan
    Makes me think I should be using a radical os
     
    #12
  13. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    19,537
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Same here. If I get to a 3rd set of singles in the Florida sun, those heavier rackets just feel like clubs to my tired arm.
     
    #13
  14. Boricua

    Boricua Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    3,084
    Yeah, over 12 ounces with 330 plus swingweight and 8 and above hl is an inferno even in a cool, breezy night. HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    #14
  15. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2012
    Messages:
    977
    Location:
    Iowa
    Very nice analysis. I tried a player's stick for a few matches and even though I am strong and in shape, I am not tennis strong/in shape if that means anything. As soon as I began to tire and lose concentration, the racquet cost me a little. When I was fresh and into the game, it was great. I switched back to a tweener for consistency.
     
    #15
  16. KenC

    KenC Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Messages:
    1,428
    Location:
    The Cliffs of Insanity
    The PK 315 is somewhere between a typical players frame and a tweener. It is actually very easy to hit with and is nowhere near as demanding as a player's frame like the BLX90 or the Babolat PSLGT to name a few.
     
    #16
  17. mbm0912

    mbm0912 Professional

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    982
    I think it's going to workout for me. My forehand needs work anyway, I can't say it's the racquet's fault. I really like the serve and backhands I'm producing with it. Again, much more comfortable than what I was using and that's what I was looking for.
     
    #17
  18. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,329
    Enjoy...Can't go wrong with that frame. Very much...skill in skill out. The frame is easy on the arm.. but will not help you that much. Not like playing with a Pure Drive.. but again as posted not like playing with the PS 90 either.
     
    #18
  19. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Messages:
    8,609
    Hopefully you still have your old racquet to help you though this transition. While this new one will probably force you toward using earlier preparation and different swing timing to hit the ball well, it might be frustrating for a little bit, especially if you're only getting out to the courts here and there.

    Changing our fundamental swing timing to get a heftier, slightly slower racquet to the ball on time takes some deliberate work. I like to think of this as changing that subconscious countdown to contact - switch to a heavier racquet and the launch order for our swings needs to come a little earlier in that countdown, right?

    If your arm and shoulder are getting exhausted with that heavier frame after maybe twenty minutes to a half hour, then your arm is probably rushing the racquet to the ball too late in your swing progression. I learned this myself when I took up with 13.4 oz. "trainers" that forced me back to the drawing board in terms of my stroke preparation and swing timing. My experiment was a little on the drastic side, but it was also a revelation for me. I'll bet that if you stay patient and keep at it, your long term gains will be worthwhile... and hopefully your arm will be healthy, too!

    If your arm and/or shoulder get good and spent with the heavier racquet in the middle of an outing, it might be smart to have your old frame to bail you out while your habits adjust. Pay attention to your bigger muscle groups, the ones in your legs and your core, and they should eventually contribute the energy your shots need. It just takes a little while.

    Oh, as far as those labels are concerned, if you are a player (which you are) and you own a racquet... that means that it's a player's racquet... HA!!! There's no honor or shame in keeping the "right" racquet or dumping any frame if it isn't right for you. Smooth sailing!
     
    #19

Share This Page