System 5: Key 4 Tennis Theory

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Bungalo Bill, Apr 11, 2008.

  1. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    THE FIVE HEIGHTS

    The highest percentage of points a player loses are on balls that either go out or into the net. Thus, the trajectory of your ball is critical. By understanding how to calculate the correct height of any shot in any situation, you can significantly reduce the number of unforced errors in your game.

    The 5 heights concept is measured at the point where the ball passes over the net, with each height number corresponding to the width of an average midsize racquet. To determine the correct height at which to hit a shot back to your opponent's baseline, you must first be aware of your zone location. For example, if you are deep in Zone 5, hit your shot 5 racquet heights above the net. From Zone 2, hit two racquet heights above the net.

    There are two additional factors that influence the height of your shot: the ball characteristics (speed and spin) and the location of your opponent on the court.

    The speed (pace) you put on the ball is a factor in determining the distance your shot travels, particularly if there is no spin imparted on the ball. Obviously, the more pace you put on the ball, the lower the height must be. Conversely, the less pace you put on the ball, the greater the height must be. Spin will further affect height selection. Topspin tends to make the ball drop sooner, while underspin tends to carry the ball father. Therefore, to achieve the same depth in situations where the ball speed is equal, a shot with topspin imparted will require a higher trajectory than a shot with underspin imparted. Regardless of the Zone you are in, underspin shots should be no greater than a 1 or 2 height unless intentionally hitting a lob.

    The other factor that influences your height selection is the Zone location of your opponent. When your opponent is at the baseline, use the height that corresponds to the zone in which you are receiving the ball. If your opponent is coming to the net, or is at the net, you must make one of two choices. The first is whether to hit a passing shot or a short angle shot, balls with height number no greater than 1 or 2. The second, of course, is to hit a lob. When lobbing over an opponent, multiply the 5 height by the zone number in which you are located. For example, if you are lobbing from Zone 5, your height would be 5 x 5, or 25. If you are lobbing from Zone 3, the height would be 5 x 3, or 15.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2008
    #1
  2. BeHappy

    BeHappy Hall of Fame

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    deja vu anyone lol ;)


    This is hilarious!

    4 years later you laboriously type the whole thing out again! lol
     
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  3. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    These five threads should all be combined into one big sticky. :)

    Great stuff, Bill.
     
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  4. Rafael_Nadal_6257

    Rafael_Nadal_6257 Semi-Pro

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    Isn't this a little low to be consistent? I understand a slice shot shouldn't stay up short for an opponent to attack, but considering a 1 height is the width of a racquet...
     
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  5. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Bill, I like this article you posted.

    But I'm a little confused. How do you calculate the Zone locations?

    "hit your shot 5 racquet heights above the net"

    Is that still "the width of an average midsize racquet"?
     
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  6. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    No, not for underspin. One foot is lowest so yes, yoy defintely dont want to go below this. However, higher then two feet and you risk:

    1. Having to slow down the motion which can produce (if you are not careful) a floater or an easy ball for your opponent to quickly go offensive on it and do what he wants with it.

    2. Risk hitting or saling it long if you keep the same effort into the ball.

    Remember it is a guideline. I do not think, "i need to slice this ball about a foot high". I think I need to drive through the ball and it produces a good slice ball that stays low and travels fast. Whether it is a foot, two feet, or two feet and a half, it is the outcome that I am looking for.

    Use it as a guideline and adjust it to your game.
     
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  7. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Wow, this is sort of flaming. Laboriously type? Try copy and paste. LOL!!!! ROFLMAO!

    Seriously, aren't you the one saying we should type SUPPORTING COMMENTS? I guess things just remain the same don't they. See you soon! lol
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2008
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  8. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Thanks. System 5 is a little tough for some people. I like the theory behind it because it tries to put some intelligence into what players are doing out on the court.

    I dont think you need to take everything as "law" but use it to adjust your game some.

    Also, some things may be difficult to apply directly to the court. So, take what you like and discard what you dont like.
     
    #8
  9. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    It's funny how you try to help people and you get comments like "OMG, System Five is for nOObs, LOLOLOLOLOLOLZ"!
     
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  10. Rafael_Nadal_6257

    Rafael_Nadal_6257 Semi-Pro

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    Ah got it BB, thanks.
     
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  11. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Yeah, coming from the same people that do all the crying when they get called on their errors.

    The boards dont change. They are what they are. :)
     
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