System 5: Key 5 Tennis Theory

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Bungalo Bill, Apr 11, 2008.

  1. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    THE FIVE RESPONSES

    Successful implementation of any one of the previous four keys will lead to an immediate improvement in your game. If you are able to integrate two or more (or preferably all) of these four keys, your improvement will be dramatic. However, to realize the full potential of your game, you must now develop the fifth key, The 5 Responses.

    The 5 keys concept has been designed to supply you with the tools to respond appropriately to every conceivable on-court situation. Once you know (1) where you are (2) what you can do with the ball you receive, (3) how to hit the ball and (4) when and how high to hit it, all that remains is to assemble these pieces of the puzzle to form a picture of what playing tennis is all about. The final piece of the puzzle is The 5 Responses.

    The 5 Responses concept is your ability to consistently deliver a tactically placed and/or powerfully hit ball with the appropriate spin. It is also your ability to change the pace of your shot and/or hit on the rise. This is the mark of a highly skilled player - a level that you will be able to reach if you can develop these 5 responses. To become the best you can be, you must first build each of these responses individually, and then integrate then selectively. You must begin with the most important response of all - consistency.

    1. Consistency: Above all other things, tennis is a game of consistency. Your overall objective, of course, is to limit unforced errors and keep the ball in play. But more important, once you achieved a level of consistent performance you can then begin to add to and expand the scope of your game.

    2. Placement and Depth: While you are developing your consistency, knowing where to hit a ball - and actually being able to hit it there - is the next response on which you should concentrate your efforts. The ability to deliver the ball to strategically effective areas is an important factor in being able to control a point. You must be able to produce shots with control and accuracy, which challenge your opponent's mobility by either drawing your opponent out of position, passing your opponent at the net or hitting deep. Depth here is referred to in the context of distinct distance. For example, balls that land in Zones 1, 2, or 3 all have depth but are of different distance. Balls landing in Zone 3 may be considered challenging to your opponent's timing (difficult bal to handle).

    3. Increased Ball Speed: While consistency and placement are developing, you can begin to increase the ball speed of the shot that you have received. The purpose of increased ball speed is not necessarily to overpower your opponent, but rather to return a ball to your opponent with greater velocity than you have received it. Timing is a critical factor in the game for both you and your opponent. Greater velocity upsets your opponent's timing by putting pressure on the ability to react, prepare and recover. The result can be a forced error.

    4. Change the pace and spin: In addition to consistency, placement and increased ball speed, your next response is to control the ball with various spins and/or disrupt your opponents rhythm by changing the pace of the ball. These responses present your opponent with an entirely new set of variables. Changing either the spin or pace of the ball creates conditions of uncertainty for your opponent, leading to the greater likelihood of error.

    5. Hitting on the rise: Having consistency, placement, increased ball speed and a high level of control, your final response is to be able to take the ball on the rise. The sooner you hit the ball after it bounces, the less time your opponent has to react and prepare. Moreover, taking the ball on the rise will allow you to generate more power off of your opponent's shot. Because the distance the ball travels has also been decreased by your ability to take it on the rise, the time it takes to be returned to your opponent is reduced. You have gained control of the most precious commodity in the game - time.

    With the ability to produce a quality response, the 5 Keys to Tennis are now yours. Appropriately selected, combined and applied, the 5 Keys to Tennis provide a new dimension to your game.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2008
    #1
  2. BeHappy

    BeHappy Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2007
    Messages:
    4,789
    deja vu anyone lol ;)

    This is hilarious!

    4 years later you laboriously type the whole thing out again! lol
     
    #2
  3. ElbowKid

    ElbowKid New User

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    30
    Location:
    Ontario, Can
    thank you so much for posting this very valuable information! Im really intrigued with the mental side of tennis and coming across these threads were golden to me. again, thanks :)

    p.s is there a book or website that goes in depth with system 5?
     
    #3
  4. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Is there something wrong with posting positively now? Further, this was copied and pasted in.

    I dont get it with you. If I critcise your posts, you call it flaming. However, your comments were also rather flaming should I single them out? If I post a more postive post you criticize the effort? LOL!!!

    Oh joy, I guess we are all the same on these boards and the games continue. ;)
     
    #4
  5. uspta mp

    uspta mp New User

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Messages:
    29
    bill is there a way to simplify the teminology to where the regular players can understand it?
     
    #5
  6. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    We could, however, I typed this stuff in awhile ago for those that wanted to see it. So it is verbatum from your USPTA manual if they still put that in there.

    I did copy and paste these new posts and am a little hesitant to put more effort into it.

    I believe and dont believe in the system. Certain things are practical and can transfer right away to ones game, but other things are more theory based.
     
    #6
  7. uspta mp

    uspta mp New User

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Messages:
    29
    i did see it and even an MP like me would like to make it simple.
     
    #7
  8. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Well, maybe we can, where do you think we can start? I do have Serious Tennis and it lightly touches on System 5. Maybe take out some things?
     
    #8
  9. uspta mp

    uspta mp New User

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Messages:
    29
    perhaps just eliminate the theories that haven't been proven yet. i go to other sites and take what works.
    basically trial and error.
     
    #9
  10. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Exactly.

    If something is too difficult to understand, teach, or incorporate, drop it. There are other aspects of System 5 you can spend a long time on with your students.

    Dividing the court up and the backswing thing is a good one. The ball difficulty is a great one for practice drills. It gets the person thinking how they are going to respond and really make a quick decision on the ball they are getting.

    There is some good stuff in System 5.
     
    #10
  11. Thud and blunder

    Thud and blunder Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    Messages:
    776
    BB, this series of posts is excellent stuff. Very thought-provoking; thanks for posting.
     
    #11
  12. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Good, that is exactly what I get from it. Sort of puts some intelligence in what we are trying to do out there on the court. Instead of just hitting a ball.
     
    #12

Share This Page