T2000

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by Barricade V, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. Barricade V

    Barricade V Guest

    Hey -
    I'm no classic racquet expert in the least. I picked up at a town dump what I think is a T2000, I know, very common, and I was wondering how much it would be worth, if anything.

    thanks
     
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  2. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    Much depends on the condition but i would give much more for the original Lacoste though...
     
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  3. Barricade V

    Barricade V Guest

    actually pretty excellent condition. String looks like it was freshly strung.
     
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  4. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I'd guess $5 would be a decent offer.
     
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  5. VGP

    VGP Legend

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    It's definitely worth taking it out for a hit to feel what a classic frame feels like.
     
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  6. Barricade V

    Barricade V Guest

    It feels amazing. Trust me, I'm not selling it, I'm curious to see what the value of it is.
     
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  7. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    The 'value' is pretty much what it is worth to YOU. I've purchased a few and wouldn't pay more than $10 unless I found a NOS, never played, pristine model, preferably with tags and 'new' cover.
     
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  8. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    Hey guys, don't play down its value - I'm trying to sell a couple on the bays.

    Don't forget it's been listed as one of the Top Ten racquets of all time and for that reason alone, it has some value. Its unique stringing is another interesting facet, not forgetting also that Jimmy Connors played with it for most of his career.

    Just because there are plenty around, does not substantially decrease its value - look at the 200G!
     
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  9. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Sorry Gins...didn't mean to step on any toes! The US 'bay has had quite a few over the last year or so, thus the concomitant lower prices. It also seems to be the most common 'classic' available here in central Texas(I know...wrong side of the world :) ).
     
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  10. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    I have one too and fear the day the strings break. I have a guide which describes how to string it too. I can't understand what the directions say and I consider myself to be an intelligent person. I mean.....come on......I teach Calculus and these directions are harder than any Calculus problem!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    ^^^^Say What?????

    disclaimer: It is still summer break for a few weeks and I haven't HAD to string one so I am not going to force myself to read this in full detail or attempt it either.
     
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  11. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Back in the 60's and early 70's I strung a massive # of the T 2000's.All there were back then were woodies and this racquet for the most part.I used an old antiquated machine back then as well.
    Just need to follow those directions one time, and you will be all set on stringing a # of them. Even the tie off knot is fairly simple, as there are 3 pulls to cinch it up.Its very straight foward.Biggest mistake most stringers made was not stringing the back up loop as indicated, and that string will not lay properly if the string does not back loop as indicated.Those directions are right on the money!For the basic T 2000 you just follow steps 1-6 under the T 2000, and you have the pictures to go along with it, should be straight fowards.
    Those were the simple days, as there were no patterns to check which each new racquet, as most woodies were very similar with only a few variances, and then this racquet, and an ocassional obscure racquet, but no book of patterns were needed back then, the USARSA was not even in existance, as no digest was needed.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2010
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  12. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I was a 'charter' member of the PSA(Professional Stringers Association[IF I remember the name correctly!]) back in the old days. We got semi-stumped by a few rackets but I never saw directions on the T-series...I was shown how to string it and went from there. I DO remember trying to use shared holes on the original Prince Classic...NO shared holes was unheard of before that! I also remember 'tricks' like "one at the bottom, two at the top, two at the bottom, one at the top" for the original Head Edge. Then they started putting the 'bumps' on the string strip to indicate the pattern.

    Snauwaert and Spalding had some goofy patterns for wood frames. The Pancho Segura SweetSpot was a little tricky, as well.

    These kids today don't know how easy they've got it!! :) :)
     
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  13. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Hi coach rick
    There were those obscure racquet patterns every so often. I even got a Sterling racquet to string a few months back, I use to string that one many years back. After I pulled out the stringing brochure out for that one, I sent a copy to the USRSA and they posted it on their special pattern racquet list.
    The T 2000, Wilson sent me the instruction manual back in 1968.Was very detailed instructions.For the most part, woodies and th T-2000 made up the bulk of stringing.
    With todays internet, videos, help from sites like this, all which was not avail. back then, I agree with you they now have it easy.
     
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  14. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    jim, I see we are about the same age(57, one week ago). I hadn't started playing in '68! Started working in a Columbia, SC tennis shop in '72. Over the next few years, USC(the original...Univ. of South Carolina) had 4 of the top 6 men's players using T-series rackets. The shop owner and the number one state ranked woman also used Wilson steels; so I had plenty of experience throughout the '70s handling the various T-series rackets. Only saw one Sterling...never had to string it! Quite a few Seamco rackets in my past as well.

    The T-series rackets that I've hit lately all seem to have 'original' strings(International nylon, I believe). I need to restring a couple and see what a fresh stringing feels like! Actually, the old strings hit pretty well! ;)
     
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  15. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    Ever strung a Bergelin, coachrick? Or a Madraq, Blackburne or Fox ATP Mid (the one with no string holes) ? :evil:
     
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  16. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Oh yes, the Longstring...had a student in the early '90s who LOVED her Bergelin. She had two and just when I thought she might switch to Yonex, she found TWO MORE at a yard sale! Of course, she wanted me to string them to match. :)

    Only had to string a couple of the ATP Fox rackets with the colored dots for a 'map'. Can't say I enjoyed those! I actually played with the Grey Fox for a year...have one in my collection. Got to hit with Bobby Riggs when he was hawking Fox rackets. Fox was also a sponsor of World Team Tennis in the early '90s. Strung one up for Billie Jean King(some oversize model, blue/purple). Longish story...since I don't have total recall(especially on short notice), I would jot down a word or two to help me remember new students in group lessons...could be a physical characteristic, height, lefty/righty or type of racket used. For one rather attractive young lady, I wrote down "FOX". Wouldn't you know it, another student saw my roster and assumed I was describing the young lady, NOT her racket!

    BTW, no Madraqs or Blackburnes in my past...I had to draw the line SOMEwhere! ;) .
     
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  17. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    Just as well you don't live near me then - as I have all those I mentioned. My stringer hasn't been challenged yet...
     
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  18. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    My 1986-1987 book has the diagrams for the MAD-RAQ and Fox ATP frames too.

    For other youngsters like myself (38), the ATP includes 7 pictures whereas the T2000 only had 2.
     
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  19. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    Not surprising - when I first say my ATP, I thought - well I leave it too your imagination - but it certainly beggars belief that the thing can be strung at all! LOL
     
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  20. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    NOT one I can string from memory! :)
     
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  21. theace21

    theace21 Hall of Fame

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    I remember PSA, I was a member also. I still have some old business cards with that information on the cards...Seems like it was in the late 70's.
     
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  22. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Seems like the 'certificate' was just a cheesy piece of colored construction paper. I think the shop I managed was the 24th member(or some such number). You're right, late '70s...I'm trying to envision the year we put up the certificate. Dang! I'm gettin' OLD!
     
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