tattoo or tattoo removal

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by pushing_wins, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    See? Just like some of the other threads that I post, there's always those people that criticize nearly everything I say.
     
    #51
  2. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    Yeah, I'm still not following the first part of the post here. I get that no one has perfect information, though, which is why I decide to err on the side of caution and give the benefit of the doubt whenever I'm able. As far as the 'conservative' comment, are we talking about politically conservative, or socially conservative? If the former, that's one of the reasons I asked about armed forces tattoos, generally former military falls under a politically conservative demographic. If it's socially conservative, then yeah, sure, I guess I can agree to that. It's a bit of a projection of your bias on to others, though. As long as you recognize that you're making sweeping generalizations, I'm happy leaving that assessment alone.

    Regarding the conversation piece, isn't that an assumption on your part? Are people you've conversed with (that have tattoos) telling you they put ink on their skin specifically to have a conversation piece? I think it's a bit of a stretch unless you've got overwhelming data or anecdotal evidence to say otherwise. That's MY bias, though. Maybe people ARE that vain/desperate to connect, I don't know.

    So you said that the discussion does have bearing on your life, sure, I'll concede that this is true, to a certain extent. The actual 'absolute' impact on your life, though, is very minor. I'll make the bold claim here that advertising, ideologically, at least to me is MUCH more offensive than "body art." If the point you're making is that you don't have a choice in whether or not you see silly tattoos on peoples' skin, what about the messages that are literally forced upon you every day from corporate entities? It may seem absolutely asinine that I bring this up, but I'm trying to point out the fact that we don't evaluate things on an objective basis because there are things that are 'fair game' to criticize, and there are things that we don't even think about (and accept because "that's just how it is"). Maybe i'm hypercritical about things that don't matter, but I think 'fair is fair,' and tattoos are NOT (IMHO) criticized fairly, all things considered.


    (As an aside, though, I actually DO understand why tattoos have a negative stigma, and I acknowledge where the negative stigma comes from. I just wonder if a "that's how it is" attitude is actually one of the biggest mental blocks holding the human race back from progress. Maybe this is pretty revealing on my 'constant re-evaluation' mindset on a personal level...)
     
    #52
  3. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Okay, define 'human progress'. Because I honestly believe we are devolving socially and losing our education and culture to technology.
     
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  4. dParis

    dParis Hall of Fame

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    I've decided to get my tattoo removed.

    Actually, it's not really my tattoo. I'm getting my pet rock's tattoo removed. It's sitting on top of my humidor.
     
    #54
  5. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    I'll humor you, although I don't think it's particularly important in the context of the discussion. To clarify, my point was to say that if people aren't critical about their environment and the lives they lead/choices they make, and/or simply follow tradition for tradition's sake, they will lose opportunities to improve/change the way things are.

    Your question suggests that change may not always be good (and I can acknowledge this).

    As far as 'human progress,' and education and culture, I think you have a point -- if you look at it through a specific perspective. To say technology does not spawn its own culture and provides its own opportunities for 'education' is actually quite humorous from MY perspective. While I know exactly what you mean, and I agree to a certain extent personally, I think it's short sighted to make a claim like yours. A few things for you to think about:

    A) If we had no modern agricultural technology, it's likely that a much larger portion of the population would be doing manual labor in fields. Perhaps we'd be carrying buckets of water all day to sustain our livelihoods.

    B) If we had no industrial technology, we'd have more blue collar jobs in manufacturing and "skilled labor." Is it actually better to have a human vs. a robot assemble cars, for instance?

    C) If we had no modes of rapid communication (pre-phone era), information distribution would be much slower. Is this necessarily good, or necessarily bad?

    D) I'm considered by my friends and family to be "a computer guy." Someone stops by and asks "My computer is broken, can you fix it?" Even if I DON'T know what's wrong, and/or have never seen the issue before, chances are I can get the job done... why? I can look it up. Prior to the internet, chances are I'm going to find that in the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

    E) I'm not (especially) mechanically inclined, but I can diagnose and do most minor car repairs on my own. I've got neither formal training nor particular interest in cars (that might be an exaggeration), but I can get a very good idea of what's wrong with my car (when that happens) and have an educated guess (and reasoning) as to what's wrong, and I won't get shafted by a crappy diagnosis at the dealership that turns out to be a wild goose chase that I'm footing the bill for.

    F) A more local example: Someone's looking for a new tennis string, and their demo options are extremely limited. They have to pay $20 in labor, but they are looking for X or Y change over their current string. It gets expensive really quickly to go with blind recommendations from the high school kid stringing frames at the local sporting goods store. TTW provides instant feedback and you can narrow your options much more quickly.

    While I have an inkling these are completely unrelated to the issues you see with current society, they are on the absurd side because it all depends on what frame of reference you want to compare to. Things are/were different in the past, and this doesn't automatically make things worse. While I find it personally grinding to see the writing style of "young kids" these days, and the care and effort that is put towards communications, I don't automatically assume that the younger generation is doomed for failure. Quite frankly, every generation thinks the generation following theirs is on a downwards spiral.

    This is an even bigger tangent to the thread, though, so I'm going to drop the discussion here. As far as hope for the future, I think it is bright. The cream of the crop today as compared to the cream of the crop of yesterday is not too different in terms of potential. As far as the bell curve and the "average citizen," IMHO there are bigger issues than technology if you're going to point fingers w.r.t. society crumbling..

    Technology is a tool, and it can be used or abused (in)appropriately as such.
     
    #55
  6. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    I understand your points DD, but I'm going to end it here as well because the thread derailed around 7 posts ago.

    Nice topic though! Here, it seems that people won't discuss because it is over their heads...
     
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