Taylor Townsend

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by floridatennisdude, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    #1
  2. JLyon

    JLyon Hall of Fame

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    good luck to her, I just hope this was not a rash decision, she is still young with room to improve, but her results do seem to show she is ready.
     
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  3. Tcbtennis

    Tcbtennis Professional

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    I wish her the best also. I saw her play the junior Australian Open final on a live stream this year and because her style of play is more developed than the other young girls coming up I'm hopeful that she can find some success. Instead of just staying at the baseline and trade groundstrokes, Taylor regularly came to the net to volley. Her opponent just didn't know what to do. She would try to pass or lob but Taylor was very comfortable at the net and had great overheads and touch volleys. Taylor also has a powerful lefty serve that will be an advantage. In my opinion, she will likely be the most successful of all the young Americans working their way through. Will she be Top Ten? I don't know but I think that she has a better shot than Keys, McHale, Stephens, Hampton, Falconi, Oudin, and Vanderweghe.
     
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  4. JLyon

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    Saw Townsend at the 18 Clays last year and she was impressive with her movement and ability to get to the net which is not seen enough. I would agree she has potential more so than Oudin, Falconi, and Min.
    Keys, Stephens are still growing. Coco went to early. Also Andrews will be an up and comer to watch.
    McHale is moving up. Future looks good for the ladies.
     
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  5. Soianka

    Soianka Hall of Fame

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    I too hope this is not a premature decision.

    Taylor definitely has tons of potential to be a top player.

    I agree with the above person though that Keys and Stephens are just getting started and all 3 players have great potential.

    I am starting to think that Jamie Hampton is going to be a big deal. She isn't getting as much press as the other youngsters, but I have a hunch that she might pull ahead of the pack soon.

    It's hard to see very much from Oudin at this point. I love Irina Falconi but she is of slight build and has struggled to beat top players. She may have stalled out as a top 80 player. I guess we will see.
     
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  6. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

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    Would playing challengers and college be the better route than turning pro so early?
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    If a player can make it to the pros, she/he needs to play against the best competition possible, so nothing is a surprise when the final step is taken.
    There is no gain to playing Q's and college, while ducking the best players, and not seeing the best players in person from the other side.
     
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  8. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

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    For Taylor, age 15, is that the most prudent choice to make?

    Pro tennis or college scholarship to a top school.

    How would one define a successful pro career, money, ranking or just personal satisfaction.
     
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  9. Keysmickey

    Keysmickey Rookie

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    I think she (Townsend) has a shot at being a decent pro. Great game but how will it's upkeep be maintained as she ages? She's certainly the only one of those mentioned with a real shot. Whomever said keys and Stephens are 'still growing' please elaborate ... Although neither have the chops anyway.
     
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  10. seminoleG

    seminoleG Semi-Pro

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    Just a guess, but I'm sure her endorsement deals have a college clause. That is what seems to be in vogue with Women Juniors turning Pro.

    I know 2 girls one finished the other starting medical school paid in full by contract.
     
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  11. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Problem here....
    NObody can ever be sure it's too early to start the pro career, however...
    It's pretty obvious that for MOST players, finishing college is well TOO LATE to start the new journey.
    Part of getting good is the WANT part, the desire to endlessly practice and work on the game. Few college grads have the desire to work on a tennis game, although a few exist, and are part of the top 50. A FEW is too few.
    Literally thousands of college grads fall by the wayside of the pro tennis world, choosing education over experience, until it's just too late.
     
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  12. tistrapukcipeht

    tistrapukcipeht Professional

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    I have bad news for her, being almost 200 Lbs if not more, they will cream her.
     
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  13. Soianka

    Soianka Hall of Fame

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    LOL

    Yeah, okay.
     
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  14. Soianka

    Soianka Hall of Fame

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    Except she probably weighs 160 or so and she is upwards of 5'8.
     
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  15. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    Serena did ok with a similar body type. Capriatti too.
     
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  16. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    She is top 500 in the world at age 15. That is why you skip college, because you are ready. There are not thousands of players as ready as Taylor is.
     
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  17. Tcbtennis

    Tcbtennis Professional

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    Girls usually reach their full adult height between the ages of 14-16 therefore it makes sense that they turn pro at an earlier age than boys. At that point in addition to working on their game they can work on strength and fitness. For girls, turning pro after going to college can result in a lot of "lost" years of experience competing against stronger players.

    That being said, a career in professional tennis is definitely a gamble. I'm sure the pathway to a pro career is riddled with broken dreams. In my opinion, to make this decision you have to have shown the ability to compete successfully against the best. Winning a junior slam is definitely shows that you can.

    Also, Taylor Townsend is nowhere close to 200 lbs.
     
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  18. maggmaster

    maggmaster Hall of Fame

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    Yea she doesn't look 200, she will probably work on fitness diligently before she actually goes pro though. Consider that it is much easier to improve fitness than tennis skill. I saw her play at a wildcard playoff last year, she is definitely a step above most national level juniors.
     
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  19. HIGH-TECH TENNIS

    HIGH-TECH TENNIS Rookie

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    Absolutely NO DOUBT about it: COLLEGE. I hope Taylor goes to college - I hope Grace goes to college - and I wish Jamie had gone to college. We've known these three wonderful young ladies for the past 6 years and I would and have told them many times that I hope they go to COLLEGE.
     
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  20. jigglypuff

    jigglypuff Rookie

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    How are they going to graduate from college? That's the question.
     
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  21. floridatennisdude

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    Grace is real border line. She beats a lot of strong college players in itf's already. She may benefit from a year in school, but I think she needs to go on tour.

    I think Jamie will be ok. She got out of the 1st round at the Austrailian and just made $43k in Indian Wells, where she went 3 with Radwanska. She has already won 7 matches against top 100 opponents this year.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
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  22. HIGH-TECH TENNIS

    HIGH-TECH TENNIS Rookie

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    We follow Jamie relatively closely and I know she's having some real success for which we are very excited. Please don't misunderstand: I think all three have tremendous talent but I just feel life on the pro circuit is just too rough. As someone who cares about more than just their tennis abilities, I say COLLEGE is the way to go. We're all just giving our opinions here (obviously) so there's mine! :)
     
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  23. 10ismom

    10ismom Semi-Pro

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    I have a different opinion about this.

    For extremely talented young ladies with good financial and coahing support, they should go ahead and turn pro.

    America needs them (badly) to try and.....try to be a world top 10 or a Grand Slam winner.

    Having said that...., if they have doubts in their potential and know their brain will earn them brighter future....then....go to college.
     
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  24. CoachDad

    CoachDad Rookie

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    Agreed, I will be watching these young ladies with interest. Taylor is an enigma too me. I have watched her, she appears slower than the other players, does not seem to anticipate all that well, strokes good but not world class.....but the young lady just wins! Good luck to her in the pros.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
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  25. Tcbtennis

    Tcbtennis Professional

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    The only match that I saw of Taylor was the junior Australian Open final. She just stood out to me because of her persistence of attacking the net. I'm not a tennis coach. My experience just comes from having two junior tennis players, one who is a girl. I've been to many tournaments with my daughter but never to a national. I've been lucky enough to attend lower level (25K) womens pro tournaments as well as high level (Miami) pro tournaments. The more and more I see the more the women look like cookie cutter tennis players. Stand at the baseline and hit the ball. There is absolutely no variety. There is no serve and volley, no chip and charge, no angles, no drop shots, no slices. Taylor does all these things as well as having power. I think that is why she wins. Her opponents are flummoxed by the change in pace and spin because they are not used to seeing it. 

    It's funny because my daughter has a great backhand slice that is deep, penetrating and stays low. Do you think that she ever uses it in a match? Never! When I ask her why she just gives me a blank stare. 
     
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  26. CoachDad

    CoachDad Rookie

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    I hear you Tcbtennis, Taylor has a great variety which is uncommon these days. Now in the pros attacking the net is not done as much in years past partly because of the modern racquets and strings. When someone can rip a passing shot with accuracy from 5 feet behind the baseline....sort of negates much of the volley game. Taylor will have to adjust to the entirely different pace, spin and accuracy of the pro game. She will not be able to attack nearly as much as in juniors.

    That being said, it is criminal how so many players are never or hardly ever exposed to slices, drops, angles, volleys, etc. as little ones.

    I have seen that stare your girl gave you many times! One of the hardest things is to get a kid to do anything outside their comfort zone in competition.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
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  27. treeman10

    treeman10 Semi-Pro

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    ---------------------
     
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  28. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Alway, every single time, on your death bed, you say ..... "it's better to have tried and FAILED than to never have had the opportunity to have tried at all".....
    YES, most will fail.
    And yes, it's better to have tried, than never to try.
     
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  29. TennisFan2Day

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    Taylor could easily spend the next two years playing nothing but pro events and keep her amateur status. She is only a Sophomore. The USTA isn't going to stop paying her way because that is their best chance right now at a female American champion. Let's see her win some Futures and Challengers events before making the statement that she is ready to go pro. Then, in 1 or 2 years, if she isn't where she thinks she should be at least she hasn't lost anything. It isn't like she is going to train any more or any differently than she is now.
     
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  30. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    The way I read the article, it sounds like she is going to do that.
     
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  31. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Agreed.

    If you can't try for your dream when you are young, when can you?

    Imagine if Bill Gates took the safe way when he was young, and didn't go for his dream?
     
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  32. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    Agreed.

    Playing it safe can be the most dangerous thing you do in your life, but you
    won't realize this until years down the road.
     
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  33. Tennis_Bum

    Tennis_Bum Professional

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    Nice, hope she does well. I know this if off topic but what happened to Brad's son and where is Brad nowadays? I miss those heated discussions between Brad and TCF and/or the rest of the forum. I am curious to know what happened to the kid.
     
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  34. floridatennisdude

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    There are only a very select few this is good advice for (Taylor is probably one of them). The rest should go to school, train with a competitive group, get a free (or part paid for) education, and then test the pro circuit every summer.

    You only get one shot at the college game too. After you go pro, the only way you do college is with your own finances. Failing to try the college game can also be regrettable.
     
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  35. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Yes, the pursuit of money is the greatest quest for any human being.
     
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  36. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    That statement is a generalization.......and all generalizations are flawed......so I am willing to cut it some slack.

    But even so, the comment that comes to mind is........speak for yourself.

    Even for those whose greatest quest is the pursuit of money, it is an open question whether going pro or going to college is the better route for achieving that goal, I think.
     
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  37. Soianka

    Soianka Hall of Fame

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    I tend to think that kids who want to be pro tennis players aren't solely motivated by money.
     
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  38. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    I believe college is important and valuable, but if you don't go right after
    high school, it doesn't mean it's over.

    One of my good friends grew up on welfare and after high school he went
    directly to work. He had very poor grades in high school. He worked a few
    years and then started taking classes at a city college and then later
    transferred to UC Berkeley. After that he worked
    a few more years and then later got his MBA at U. Mich, worked for a
    fortune 500 company and startups and then decided to abandon all that for
    a new career. Everything he did up to that point wasn't a waste of time.
    It all contributed to build who he is today and helps him in his work and life.
    Going to college isn't necessarily a guaranty of career success but it certainly
    helps and you develop many connections and skills that you may use later on.
    I think the social aspects are important as well.
     
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  39. CoachDad

    CoachDad Rookie

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    Yup, thats what some people miss is that many times the full ride to a great school comes along just once, the pros are always there.

    The difference in trying the pros, ending up in debt, having to slug through community college at best....or being 18, full ride, free education, try the pros in the summer.

    Very few who have a chance at a full ride should toss it away for the pros. Once can live their dream while exercising a tad of common sense. Double checking the bungee cord before leaping is not playing it safe.....you still can jump.
     
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  40. CoachDad

    CoachDad Rookie

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    Brad's kid is playing ITFs. His most recent was Carson where he lost in the 2nd round to a US kid 8 months older. Before that he made the finals in Claremont and lost to a US kid 6 months younger.

    So his results are about where they have been the past few years, good but not freakish. My guess is that TCF would advise them to keep the college option open. :)
     
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  41. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I think we sometimes have to separate the PARENT in us and remember how we were as kids.
    Sure, parents want their kids to succeed and have the best life.
    OTOH, kids need to make their decisions, grow up, and separate.
    Some say there is plenty of time for pro tennis. I think not, it's ONE shot, early in life, end of the teens.
    Some say there's plenty of time for college. Full scholarship, maybe not, but kid still has to choose his/her path in life.
    We spend hundreds of thousands raising the kids. We have a vested interest, not necessarily the best interests of the kids.
    We think we know better. Of course, we do, for ourselves.
     
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  42. CoachDad

    CoachDad Rookie

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    It is estimated the average money making pro needs about $140,000/year to pay for a shot at the pros.

    If outside sponsors are footing these bills, which is only a small % of kids who try it, great, let a kid do their thing.

    But if a kid asks a parent to foot most of the bill? The parent has the right and the duty to funnel the "dream" into something more like take the scholarship, try the futures in the summer! No one with half a brain or who is not filthy rich lets a kid's dream of being a pro throw the family $500,000 in debt in addition to all the money spent on juniors...and also in addition to tossing away a $200,000 scholarship!!

    The fact is if you are not good enough to be fully or almost fully sponsored your odds of being a pro are so tiny its a pipe dream, not a realistic dream. Sorry not every kid needs a $10,000 sweet 16 party of a shot at pro tennis.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
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  43. floridatennisdude

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    Over dramatic and, frankly, just wrong. Bad advice 99% of the time.

    Female tennis players tend to peak around age 23-25. Males between 24-26. Nothing wrong with spending 1, 2, 3, or 4 years in college. It is the best of both worlds and will prevent making a mistake so rashly.

    Jesse Levine spent a year at UF. Isner 4 at Ga. For both, the decisions seem sound. But, Tennys Sandgren spent two years at TN and went pro. He really wasn't ready. Mallory Cecil? Devon Britton? Scoville Jenkins? Etc, etc, etc.

    Every situation is unique. Taylor will probably be the #1 junior in the world by the time she is 16. I'd say that there is little left to work on at that level and it's time to make a move to the pros.
     
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  44. teentennisrules

    teentennisrules Banned

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    Just saw that there was a thread lol
    (posted this in the other thread first)

    http://fantic7.blogspot.com/

    I have seen Taylor play and she hits really hard and thats good but she doesn't move very well.

    I know you can get away with that in the Jrs but in the pros they will rock the short angles to open up the court on a player that can't move.
     
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  45. teentennisrules

    teentennisrules Banned

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    The 160 is probably correct but no where near 5'8.

    A strong 5'6.

    Really nice girl though, hope she does well.
     
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