Teaching Hospital vs Private Practice

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by tennisenthusiast, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. tennisenthusiast

    tennisenthusiast Hall of Fame

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    Which should I prefer in terms of quality of medical attention and good diagnosis and treatment.
     
  2. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    Having been on the staff of a teaching hospital (Mt. Sinai, in NYC) and several community hospitals, I've come to know that there are good and bad doctors available at both. If you live close to a teaching hospital, you'll find that your chance of finding a good doctor, as well as your chance of having care available for a wider variety of less common medical conditions, is greater at the teaching hospital. Just try not to become seriously ill in July (when the new interns and residents start.) A study of digoxin (a difficult drug for novices to use properly) toxicity at a very excellent teaching hospital in NYC found that the incidence of digoxin toxicity increased fully 1300 percent in July, then returned to its baseline level by about October.
     
  3. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Tennisenthusiast, as a physician, wouldn't you have much greater control over your schedule, including time you could spend with each patient, in a private practice setting, or would you disagree? I suppose that the answer partly depends on exactly what type of private practice you'd be working in? Of course, private practices tend to be very varied in terms of facilities, resources, and technology. Best of luck.
     
  4. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I got the impression that tennisenthusiast was asking as a potential patient or with a friend or relative as a potential patient.

    An individual or team can make an error resulting in a bad experience despite a good overall record for the hospital or practice. There are a lot of potential points for errors and hopefully hospitals and private practices have good systems in place to minimize them.

    In our state, we had the sad case of a Medical Tech that infected 39 people with hepatitis C - he was a drug user and contaminated supplies that infected patients. We've had the problem with compounding pharmacies in Massachusetts that has resulted in multiple deaths around the country. Individual and systemic errors and problems can have wide-ranging effects on patient outcomes.

    That said, you could do what some kids and parents do for colleges in your quest and look to the US News and World Report ranking of Best Hospitals if you plan to go that route.

    I've read that many private practices have merged with hospitals as hospitals bulk up to amortize the costs of paper processing and electronic data systems. I believe that hospitals are allowed to charge more for come procedures compared to private practices given them some market advantages.

    (I worked as a clerk on medical-surgical wards for several years; my mother worked as a nurse, a sister is a nurse, my son works in pathology at one of the best hospitals in the country and a niece is in med school)
     
  5. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    I think you're right. Good post. You should do your homework about where you're receiving care of course.
     
  6. tennisenthusiast

    tennisenthusiast Hall of Fame

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    I am indeed asking as a potential patient. I aint that smart to be a doctor.
     
  7. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Ha ha. I'm sure you are plenty smart! Sorry I misunderstood your question. This might be some helpful info for you.

    See: http://patients.about.com/od/attheh...ity-hospital-or-academic-medical-center_2.htm

    See: http://patients.about.com/od/attheh...ity-hospital-or-academic-medical-center_3.htm

     
  8. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    ^^ the point made about being treated by unlicensed doctors in a teaching hospital is a distortion. Every patient in a teaching hospital has at least three doctors: an intern who becomes fully licensed during his internship year, one or two residents who've already been fully licensed for from one to three years, and an attending (supervising) physician who's usually been licensed for decades and is known to be very capable. Those doctors meet at least 5 and sometimes 7 days a week to review everything about the patient's case.
     
  9. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Ollinger I suppose that's how it should work and you certainly have a lot of direct experience with this. Yet, there are exceptions aren't there at certain places? Things are not always done the way "they should be" in medical settings, whether it's private practice or at teaching hospitals. I mean, does it ALWAYS happen that way at all teaching hospitals?

    It may also be a situation in which the public may not realize how all the doctors are working together, despite the fact that student doctors play a significant role with patients. Some teaching hospitals are much better than others in terms of collaboration among doctors and info sharing. No matter what, the best advice seems to be that you should do your homework and know as much as possible about where you are receiving care and who is treating you or a loved one.
     
  10. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    ^^ if "student doctors" means medical students, they really don't play a significant role in any decision making. Very few things work perfectly all the time, but the layers of command at a teaching hospital usually work pretty well.
     
  11. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Yes, that article mentioned "student doctors" which means medical students that haven't finished their residencies I suppose. That makes sense. It's good to know that those checks are often in place at teaching hospitals.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2013
  12. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    A couple of things:

    Are you taking about the Hospital building? (Teaching Hospital refers to a facility, Private Practice refers to a practice type, usually outpatient or in the office)

    Or

    Are you refering to the doctor's practice? See above.

    Are you having a common procedure done? Is there a question of correct diagnosis?

    The final answer depends on the above (among many)
     

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