Technique adjustment

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Hewex, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Ok, I apologize if this is one of those threads that has been done to death, but I'd like some opinions/suggestions.

    Like many players, I took a lot of years off( 20+) and found my way back to playing in 2009. A little background...I started playing in the wood era. I worked my way from a Jack Kramer up through a Yamaha Secret. Then, I had a wrist injury and had to stop playing. Coming back I have used the following rackets...Wilson Triad Hammer 4.0, Liquid Metal 2, Ksurge, Prince Ozone 7 and now have settled on a Yonex RS 001MP. I love the feedback it gives me as it is being closer to a "players racquet". So, I believe it will improve my strokes. It certainly has helped my volley's and slice bh. My bh drive is where I win a lot of points.

    Now the real question. Since coming back, the way the game is played has massively changed. Now the way to play seems to be massive topspin on the forehand side ( my weaker side). I've taken lessons for over a year and that's how my pro has taught me. But, I struggle massively applying it, particulary in matches. I'm wondering if it makes any sense to go back to a more classic stroke (flatter, low to high) with an eastern grip as opposed to a semi-western. Should I stick with the more modern technique and accept it is going to be more difficult? Or is there an option in between?

    I'm very frustrated right now.

    Any opinions or suggestions would be welcome.

    Thanks,

    jim
     
    #1
  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Question is do you want to play like everyone else?
    Consider how much practice time you have compared to your expected tennis shelf life.
    Do you want to maximise your potential right now or do you want to improve your game in the long run, years from now.
    Are you into tennis to play like the top pros, or are you into tennis to play your best?
    Either grip works, even a conti forehand, you just have to choose.
     
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  3. dozu

    dozu Banned

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    there is no reason Eastern would not work. stick with what works. like LeeD was saying.
     
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  4. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Thanks Lee,

    Great questions.

    1. Being 49, I don't think I have a lengthy shelf life, at least playing singles.

    2. My goal is to become a better player down the road, but after a year, I don't see my forehand making any progress. I'm stuck in the mid 3.0 to weak3.5 level. 3.5's are difficult for me without a solid forehand.

    3. Practice: At this point, my practice is limited to the ball machine and team drills. I do not have a practice partner. My current tennis partner only wants to play sets

    4. I want to play my best now, so I'm going to work on finding a simpler, more comfortable, consistant forehand that fits me.

    5. I think an eastern grip is do-able.

    Thanks for your suggestions.
     
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  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Biggest obstacle in switching to SW or W grip is that you HAVE to swing harder and faster EVERY shot, but you and I might not have a faster swing!
    Or at least, not a faster swing for very long each day.
    Possibly, CONTROL and PLACEMENT is much more desireable, at our age, over pure topspin RPM and being able to blast away while keeping the ball in.
    We still gotta work on our backhands, our serves, our volleys, our overheads, our defensive shots, our approach's, our putaways, to worry too much about learning a new forehand.
     
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  6. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Thanks Lee,

    All that makes perfect sense. Many of us get caught up in trying to produce mega topspin. We lose to the guys who get the ball in with some depth. This gives me some good things to think about going into tomorrow's drills.

    Thanks as well Dozu.
     
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  7. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Hi,

    "a more classic stroke (flatter, low to high) with an eastern grip as opposed to a semi-western" is a great grip and stroke, modern enough, any different from s-w and its drastic topspin is non-issue because that difference really comes down to the player's capability, nothing restricting about your grip choice.

    YOu just need to work on your fundamentals. That's all.
     
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  8. dozu

    dozu Banned

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    a coach teaching a 49 year old the 'modern' fh should be fired lol..

    it burns too much energy, and also subject the student to more potential for injuries.
     
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  9. dlk

    dlk Hall of Fame

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    I just learned/implemented the topspin/SW/over-shoulder finish, and it's improved my game w/another weapon. I am typically a flat hitter, but when I can set-up or someone is handling my flat shots I change with imporved results. Some advise against switching back & forth, but it works at the 3.5 level for me.
     
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  10. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Thanks all,

    Very helpful answers. I have a good sense direction now. Those who said( user92626) that I need to work on my fundamentals are absolutely correct. That should be easier since I'll be going with something more in my wheelhouse.
     
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  11. mightyrick

    mightyrick Hall of Fame

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    If your body can't handle singles with a youthful technique, then you need to adopt the old-man technique.

    You need to become a lethal pusher. In the ladder I play in, we've got a few players who are prime pushers -- easily 4.0. Two are in their 50s. One is in his late 60s. And let me tell you, they are among the toughest to beat.

    But don't quit singles. You just need to change your approach. What are older people good at? Patience. Planning. Strategy. Even pace. Knowledge. Those qualities will absolutely crush a ton of players.

    Don't switch to doubles until you're on your last legs. Me personally... I will be playing singles until I can't go out there without a walker.
     
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  12. enishi1357

    enishi1357 Rookie

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    i use a eastern and its the best grip i have ever used. I agree on sticking on the fundamental but at the same time you should find new ways to hit your forehand without changing grip. At the end, it depends on what you want to improve on. Do you want to want on precision, consistency, pace, or power?
     
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  13. Blake0

    Blake0 Hall of Fame

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    Theres this old guy who's at his 60's on my court moving and hitting really well. Tremendous topspin, modern technique (forehand). He hits well and can keep up..but only for up to an hour. So you can definitely get there.

    A couple of questions to ask yourself:
    1.) How many hours do you play a week (average)?
    2.) What NTRP do you want to get to?
    3.) What NTRP do you think is within reach?
    4.) How would you learn it, coach/self taught/online?
    Personally though,i'd say if you're going to stick with tennis for a couple years down the road (even if its just to stay fit), why not switch to a WW forehand, you don't have to go semi-western either. It's simple to go back if it doesn't work. Just be careful to not get injured though.
     
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  14. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Balogna. My coach absolutely cleans my clock with his "modern" forehand. He's 59.

    And I thought that the forehand doesn't use much energy when you are in tune with gravity?
     
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  15. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    My goal this year is to become a solid 3.5 player. Long term, I'd love to be a 4.0, but I'd have to play more than twice per week. I'm athletic and cover court very well. At this point I try to end the point as quickly as possible by playing serve/volley and chip/charge. At my level, no one really plays that type of game or expects it. So, it is fairly effective for me. But, I know that in order to improve and get to 3.5, I need to develop a more all-court game. This means finding a forehand I can rely on.
     
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  16. dozu

    dozu Banned

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    oops my bad, forgot about gravity lol.
     
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  17. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    First there is an in between, you don't have to go Nadal, you can go Federer who uses close to if not a regular eastern grip.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXcsblS3Jl4

    Second the WW is more about low to high swing path giving you net clearance and top spin to still bring the ball back down in play than whipping your wrist over. The WW followthrough happens rather naturally as a consequence of the greater low to high swing path. Focus on the swing path and let the follow through happen. Hopefully this will save you from a repeat wrist injury.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtuTHsFlfGg

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoYaPLPBCzA&feature=channel

    Later progressions are available on his website...free just for giving up your email.

    http://www.fuzzyyellowballs.com/video-tennis-lessons/forehand/

    You sound a lot like me in the fall of 2008. I hadn't played much tennis since taking tennis as a PE class in college over 20 years prior, but I was "athletic and covered the court very well." I was a middle of the road 3.0 and that was mostly due to court coverage, I was faster than most of those I played, making the other side hit one more ball. My forehand just pushed the ball back, though I did have a relatively decent one handed backhand, so like you my fh was actually my weaker side and I sometimes ran around it!

    I now trade sets with 4.0s both in singles and doubles. I'm not a 5.0 or claiming to be great, but I have improved a lot compared to where I was, to where the game is much more fun for me b/c of the shots I can now it. I have a decent fh hand with good though not extreme topspin that I can rely on to trade fh rallies and occasionally put away a winner. Its not a lethal weapon others claim on here but its consistent with more accuracy and much more pace than 2 years ago. The topspin also allows me to hit dippers which can be effective in doubles and when someone tries to take the net in singles.

    I'm confident if you are as described that you can do that to. It will probably take playing at least 2 times per week though. Once per week probably won't get the results you are looking for...at least not any time soon. I took a few clinics but I have watched many hours of YouTube videos!...not just about forehand though...backhand, volley, serve, singles and doubles strategy, etc. Fuzzy Yellow Balls, Coach Kryil, Brent Abel and many others. I then focus on a few things on the court and then go back and watch the videos again.

    Finally, to repeat #1 I have a friend who restarted around the same time I did. He uses an extreme semi-western grip and topspins the heck out of the ball. He also has 3 hour singles matches b/c he hangs at the baseline and topspin loops everything back, consistent and deep. I can't do that one b/c I can't hit well using that extreme a grip and two I don't want to play that way. So move your grip over some but it doesn't have to be extreme, bring your racquet back w/ 2 hands to get our shoulders turned and let it drop, leaving your off hand out for spacing, swing your racquet face low to high, let the follow through happen. Shadow swing this in you living room every chance you get. Then take it to the courts.

    Really, just the FYB progressions will give you a good base for a stable, effective and repeatable forehand. Here are a few others...there are MANY and you can pick up a slightly different tidbit from each.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kPaH_IaazY

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TrKHZzetpc

    You are not too old to incorporate beneficial parts of the "modern" forehand into your game. If you are 49 and the your exercise is chasing the dog of your La-z-boy, maybe, but not if you are "athletic and cover the court very well". Good luck.
     
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  18. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    Djok4life is right, Modern is the most efficient way to play. It is way easier on the body when learned correctly.

    Don't get traditional fundamentals confused as being the only fundamentals. Modern has a different and better set of fundamentals IMO. Traditional instructions is the reason for 80% of the questions and problems you see on the board. It causes you to develop a whole bunch of compensations to control the ball as you get more power in your game.

    You admit that the Fh is the weaker side and that you are a 3.5 or lower player, so of course it is somewhat of a challenge! It's new and different, and on your weaker side. What do you expect? If you want to get better faster, then by all means, seek out good modern Fh instruction and learn it. You will be so glad you did, cause it will allow you to hit harder and harder as you get better, while retaining control of your shots!
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2011
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  19. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I'm 45 and grew up a serve and volley player, but I had to solidify my ground strokes in more recent years so that I could stay in more points at the baseline. My strength is still my net play though, so I'd say I've evolved from a S&V'er to an all-courter. While I like being able to do something with the ball from most areas of the court, I also like being able to earn points without having to endure long grinds from the outback. Sounds to me as though you're in a similar boat.

    Yes, some players (and teachers) have gotten big-time hung up on mega baseline topspin strokes. That's fine in my book just as long as these players also learn a full skill set, including a sound net game. I've coached high school kids for a few years and that's where it's easiest for me to recognize the advantages that go to the player that can transition forward well in competition. Trading blows from the baseline is okay unless you're outgunned, right? Without the skills to move forward, most players have no Plan B.

    I actually think that you're in a rather good situation, since you only need to get a better forehand together. I believe you've got a lot less ground to cover than if you decided to become a stronger net rusher today. If you network like crazy and track down a couple of kindred spirits who also want to hit the grinder (oh, they're out there), that will help you on your way. A lesson or two should also help, but shoring up that baseline game will probably require putting in some hours to learn the habits you need.

    If you're after a stronger forehand with some margin for error, I doubt it would take long to grow accustomed to hitting with a grip that's shaded more toward SW without having to go to a radically different stance and swing. You'll probably just need to log the hours necessary to learn the appropriate timing, swing path, and contact point to make it click. Since you're also a net crasher, you'll probably always have uses for an eastern and a continental grip, too.

    A note concerning gear. No, it's not all about the racquet, but an all-court game can potentially benefit from what I consider to be gear that offers the best of both worlds - both old school and more modern aspects. When I got into graphite racquets, I settled on the ProStaff 6.1 Classics which I consider to rank among the all-time best instruments for S&V play. Plenty of pop along with decent touch, but also heavy and stiff. I always needed to hold back when swinging from the baseline with those frames.

    For net play, I simply need the stability that comes with a heavier racquet, but when I tried some alternatives with more flex, I enjoyed a night-and-day better experience hitting full strokes under control, too. Frames including the Prince NXG (both mid and mid-plus), Volkl C10 Pro 98, and Head LM Prestige mid have been very welcome additions to my bag.

    While your Yonex is certainly a sharp performer, I don't see much in your racquet history in terms of more flexible options since the Yamaha. Since we come from a similar era, wood into graphite, I encourage you to try some demos from the softer end of the spectrum. The Yonex RD Ti 80, Prince Ozone Tour, and even the Volkl C10 could all be worth a go. Not suggesting that you have to change your gear, but simply offering the idea of demoing in case you haven't tried out some more flexible racquets. Knowledge is power, or so they say.
     
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  20. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Thanks!! Those look very helpful. I am going to submit my email to get more videos. I had used Oscar Wegner's DVD's to work on the WW. I had some success, but I also was playing more and using the ball machine once a week. My confidence and technique both left me as my tennis became less frequent.

    Going forward, my goals are to use the ball machine more for reps and find a good practice partner. I love the shadow swing idea. I'm going to start using that tonight.

    I'd love to progress to where you are now. Thanks so much for the encouragement and for the links!
     
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  21. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    You're right, I know that. I was trying to just "get by", but that is foolish. I'll continue to work through things by hitting a lot of balls and get some professional insight.

    Thanks for the encouragement! Hopefully, I can come back with some positive results to talk about. I do know it will take time, and I have to stick with it.
     
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  22. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Thanks for the post and the encouragement. I'll have to demo those racquets. I switched to the Yonex because it was much more stable than either my Wilson or my Prince. Plus, it was heavier, which I like. I assumed a stiffer racquet would be more stable?...I do like it a lot, but am open to switch to a better fitting model.
     
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  23. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Well, I put "modern" in quotes so we wouldn't have to do the whole "us vs. them", "the dark side vs. the light", etc. As you know, this stuff has been around forever.
     
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  24. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    I'm still dumping WW forehands into the net. I know it's hard without a video. I'll try to post one this weekend. But, is there a common cause for this result?
     
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  25. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    When I first started trying to hit with more topspin I was so focused on WW that I would sometimes whip up on the ball without really hitting it! I didn't swing through the ball at all, just pull my racquet up right as I got to the ball...no power or depth. From the baseline I had to remind myself that I still had to hit the ball! Think low to high through the ball more than "windshield wiper". Finish with your hitting arm elbow high and generally pointing in the direction of your target and the WW should happen pretty naturally. Good prep will help with a full swing path as well.

    Make sure, regardless of whether you are hitting from and open or closed stance that you are hitting from a firm base. Even if you are running back for a ball try to plant your back foot as you begin your swing. When I start hitting short this is usually the reason, I'm hitting as I'm falling back...no power or depth control.

    Here is the Australian Open man of the hour Djokovic moving back to hit a forehand...notice how he plants just before contact, his swingpath and follow through.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8AJYfkJ4hc
     
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  26. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Great thoughts. I think that is exactly what I am doing, both not getting planted and not really hitting the ball. Like a bad quarterback, I get "happy feet" unless I remind myself.

    Great video. From what I feel about myself, I think he lets the racquet drop a lot more on the forward swing than I do. Something for me to work on. Also, what are your thoughts on how he finishes his backswing? He turns the racquet in a clockwise direction.

    Thanks a lot for the advice. Very, very helpful.
     
    #26
  27. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    Hopefully you see that I do the same in avoiding to stir up a controversy over terms. We have always agreed that the strokes now termed modern, have been used to one extent or another, throughout history.
    Hopefully what we can also agree to, is that they were not widely taught until more recent times.
     
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  28. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    Need to notice a couple of things in that Djoker vid.

    -he is finishing over the shoulder, not the standard WW you are mentioning
    -notice that from contact on, he is swinging on a plane greater than 60 degrees up, opposed to swing out to the target as some would suggest
    -if were looking directly on, you could see he is also pulling the contact across strongly at contact as well as swinging very vertical.

    I strongly agree with having a very stable base to hit from for any Fh you can.
     
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  29. peoplespeace

    peoplespeace Semi-Pro

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    He turns the racket clocwise at end of backswing/beginning of forward swing by supinating his forearm to get the rackethead in vertical position or pointing slightly downwards. If he didnt the racketface would be pointing upwards at impact (unless he tilted his whole body to the right side which would look very funny!)

    I agree with those who say that u should go for sw with more topspin if ur athletic and relatively strong. Old style is ok what ur in command but if ur opponent hits to u with alot of topspin u have to hit topspin back which is much easier with sw than eastern, unless ur federer.
     
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  30. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    Agree, not as extreme as say Nadal, but I think the OP is looking for something short of extreme SW grip and extreme WW motion. Djokovic finishes high but with racquet head lower than wrist, elbow and shoulder. I don't think it would be mistaken for a classic forehand of say an Ivan Lendl with racquet head finish high over the shoulder.

    I think he is looking for a swing that will give him more topspin, more consistency and in the vein of the WW forehand. Or at least that's what I'm suggesting...maybe its not what he is looking for! :)

    Lendl: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jsEKwaO5pzA

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3dZ0rnouhk

    Nadal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inQvbT8uEGk
     
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  31. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    It's the across part that I'm not doing. Just doing the vertical portion dumps it into the net. So, it's the combination of vertical and across that gives him the big topspin and pace.
     
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  32. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Is that turning move a good one to implement in order to get the racquet in the correct position?

    Definitely going with the SW grip.
     
    #32
  33. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    I would certainly take the Djoker's forehand. :)...and from what you're saying, it's not as extreme as some. So maybe it is something I can do utilizing the suggestions I've gotten here. I definitely need more topspin and consistancy. I have very little of either right now, ha!
     
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  34. peoplespeace

    peoplespeace Semi-Pro

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    well, if ur racket head is pointing upwards at the end of ur preparation, then u will have to turn the racket clockwise at some point, most pro do this as they begin their forward swing and u can use gravity to do this to create momentum and facilitate rythm. If u take ur racket back with the head in the position that u want to have at impact then the is no need for turning it further clock wise unless u at the last moment find out u will need to hit the ball more upwards than u were expecting, but then the risk of golfing the shot and hitting long is greater (unless u hit close to the bottom edge of the frame (outside sweetspot) in this emergency situation, which pros will often do to aviod gofling)
     
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  35. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, I'd take it too! I'm sure Djoker can hit pretty much any style he wants when he wants and the first link I posted is just one isolated stroke. Pros hit a variety of forehands depending on where they are in the court and where and how they want the ball to go. DTL flat drive winner, cross court pull, inside out, short ball WW put-away, deep ball loopy defensive, pulled wide reverse fh, standard rally ball, even defensive slice fh, etc. They make all kinds of swing and stance modifications depending on the incoming ball and what outgoing ball they want. Obviously different players favor a certain general overall style more or less than others, but all the pros have the ability to adjust to the situation.

    That's why I wouldn't get too hung up on some small swing variances until the general rally ball basics are sound. I think if you get the basics...plant, prep, drop, low-to-high through the ball to some degree then your natural athleticism will adjust the follow-through appropriately. Though I will say focusing on a high elbow finish helps my consistency and I think it gets my body more involved so I "arm it" less. I see some pros do this and others not so much.

    Keep in mind I'm a 3.5/4.0 hacker and not a coach or high level player. I'm commenting only b/c I've been on a similar journey and gone from running around my fh to hit my bh to running around my bh to hit my fh. So I know what has worked for me...even if its from a fairly low level to a middling/decent level! I can only offer what my experience has been.

    Here is a little lower Novak finish: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbsQ8gZLWyc&feature=related

    EDIT: BTW I like these threads not only to pick up tips from others but to get me thinking about the key points I need in my swing as well.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2011
    #35
  36. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    I thought the vid was excellent and you made good points. Just thought he needed to realize he was not looking at classic ww in that vid.
    IMO WW and Rev Fhs are mostly just variations off of the normal TS Fh.
    Naming them in the current fashion is fine, but I think it leads to more misunderstanding.
    I have another post where I mention that each of these have more to do with contact point than swing, as I can use the same swing and give you the over the shoulder, the Rev Fh or the WW Fh; by only changing the contact point. I don't see the straight arm Fh as a separate Fh either, but just an extended variation of the normal (double bend) Fh.

    I also have a Fh that works the outside of the ball and can finish with the Rev/bolo or the ovr the shoulder. This one is a separate Fh to me as it uses an extended flat wrist opposed to the laid back wrist working the inside of the ball.
    Then there is also the traditional Fh, but IMO that is not a valid technique due to the inherent flaws.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2011
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  37. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Video added

    Wow, thanks for all the input. You guys are great! I posted a video on youtube that I took of my forehand last year. If anything, it's gotten worse! It takes about 30 seconds before I have the camera set and the ball machine running. It's long and I don't have any editing software. But, you can watch for a minute or so and get the idea.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLrTZnDes4Q
     
    #37
  38. dman72

    dman72 Hall of Fame

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    I'll tell you one thing..on super quick and slick public courts where I play most of the summer, topspin is OVERRATED. You would be fine with an eastern grip.

    A local club where I live had decca turf surfaces to the specs of the US OPen (which is supposed to be fast), and it's so much slower than the local asphalt courts, it's crazy. A guy from my club, which has a worn out and gritless fast surface, complained when we played there..that it was too slow.
     
    #38
  39. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    You could definitely benefit from dropping the racquet further below the ball. From there the followthrough takes care of itself.

    After you complete your shoulder turn, your left arm is doing nothing. It's just hanging there, like a wet noodle. If you extend the left arm towards the side fence, you get a more shoulder turn, and you can track the flight path of the ball better with your left hand. This would help one of your biggest problems, that your contact point is inconsistent.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2011
    #39
  40. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    good stuff here and this case, it would help with balance and shoulder turn during the swing by pulling across to the left.
     
    #40
  41. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    That makes a lot sense. It gives me something to look at with the pro's as to what they are doing. I'm pretty excited to work on this stuff. It will take some time, but it should be fun too.
     
    #41
  42. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    I did drills last night, mostly doubles. With the soft feeds, you had to generate your own pace.

    On forehand passing shots hit at the net players( doubles drill) I had no power. The only decent forehands I hit all night were hit up the doubles alley curling back into the court.

    I watched my fellow players hit hard forehands looking like they had a lot of leverage on the ball. While I have no power on the forehand side. I was the weakest player on the court, all were very good 3.5's or 4.0's. Yet, my 1hbh could hang with any of theirs. I guess I'm going to have to start running around forehands to hit bh's. :)

    Thoughts on creating leverage( not sure that is the right word) and feeling like I have nothing left when the racquet gets to the ball?
     
    #42
  43. Hewex

    Hewex Semi-Pro

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    Ok, new video from Saturday. It's less than 3 minutes with a minor interruption. Definitely a work in progress.


    A few things.

    Positives

    1. I made that huge change in my grip. I'm between SW and Western now. It took me a while, but I've added a tremendous amount of spin and more consistantcy.

    2. I'm not shortarming the ball as much.

    3. I'm trying to accelerate the racquet through the ball. I believe I am doing that much better.

    4. I'm getting great pace, depth and spin. I especially nailed the last ten balls or so.

    Negatives

    1. I can see my footwork is terrible and my off arm is still dangling.

    2. My strokes are not very fluid or smooth. I'm getting great results though, so that confuses me.

    3. The twirly bit at the end on those last few balls. As I say, I was killing those with pace, depth and spin. But, it looks awkward.

    Finally, I stopped for a moment because the two teen girls next to me were looking at my court, and I thought one of their balls was on it. I guess they were just watching an old man look funky out there. :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hV3Ah7SpZn0
     
    #43
  44. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    You hit all rally balls.
    Not once did you step in, lower your torso, and aim for a forcing winner or a blazing passing shot.
    You need different forehands for different situations. You now have a nice rallyball, something you can hit repeatedly which is hard to attack.
    Now you need that forcing winner shot from your forehand. Close shoulders wind up much earlier and wait on the ball, then flatten out your stroke and hit it 100mph, not 50.
     
    #44
  45. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Lee, surely you realize that the best way the learn specific techniques is to focus on them one at a time? Didn't Rios practice one shot for hours, then move on to another one the next time? If you obsess over mixing things up while still in the learning process, you just get a variety of mediocre shots rather than great strokes with true versatility.
     
    #45
  46. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Interesting take....
    I mistakenly thought OP was complaining about hitting softie shots all the time on his forehand, so would consider hitting it flatter or faster.
    So he switches to almost W, like I did a month ago, and he keeps hitting softie shots, while I seem to stroke faster, adding more topspin, then easily able to flatten it out and sometimes approach 90 mph on my new forehand off balls lower than mid chest high.
    Of course, my new grip gives me SLOWER rally balls, maybe 50 mph, but looped 6' above the baseline and bouncing easily top of the head, sharp angled CC or DTL no problem, with the new faster swing.
    That modern, faster swing certainly gives me better directional control, at the expense of resting, being lazy, and depth control. Gotta swing faster on rally balls, about the same for flatter putaways....taken farther out in front.
     
    #46
  47. dozu

    dozu Banned

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    @Hewex - not too bad... your racket path is better... you are now wiping a windshield while the car is moving foward :)

    more relaxation is needed.... on scale of 1-10, 10 being the tightest you can grip, hold it at 3-4, thru the entire swing, except into impact it will naturally tighten.

    This should help you getting a wet noodle like passive arm, and you will then be forced to use the legs, hips, core to power the wet noodle thru.

    you should feel that the collision is not between the racket and the ball, but rather the arm/racket unit and the ball.... it's a very heavy / powerful sensation that you will sure enjoy :)

    Another 'visual' you can use, is to swing the elbow into the ball.... since the elbow is right about the center of gravity of the arm/racket unit, this should get you close to swinging the 'human racket' LOLOLOL.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
    #47
  48. Racer41c

    Racer41c Semi-Pro

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    So here's what I can Add. My Girlfriend is a GREAT tennis player. Hits eastern forehands. There are specific benefits to that shot which are very different than western topspin shots. She has great depth control and the ability to keep the ball low even to the point that if the ball skids it's really hard to pickup. She never hits a sitter. She is also able to block back hard hit balls very effectively.

    So you have focus your forehand on the strengths of the eastern. Work on hitting better quality forehands, including the variety of eastern shots like forehand slice angles. That one wins a lot of points.:p
     
    #48
  49. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    ^^^^^^^^ I must admit, I've been toying with the idea of going more eastern on my forehand. Just feels weird though when your palm is behind the handle rather than under it. Almost like a different sport.

    *Ironically I started out with an eastern*


    P.S. You do realize that everyone is going to ask for a video of your girlfriend hitting, right?
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2011
    #49
  50. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Funny, I got the impression that he was one of your typical middle aged "flat" hitters who wants to add more spin.
     
    #50

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