Temperature and tension

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Zverev, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    I wonder if someone has any rule regarding how you should change tension with changing temperature to retain same control.
    Example:
    I have strung MP Tour 5 with Plasma at 58 and Gosen crosses at 58,
    played with this 3 days ago when temperature was 100 Deg F (37 Deg C),
    and the power was a bit too much.
    Yesterday temperature dropped to 65 Deg F (around 18 Deg C),
    was perfect for tennis, played with same setup and the feel was absolutely different, PERFECT CONTROL !

    I think we will have hot February down here, so I am just wondering how much more tension should I put in to get that control I enjoyed yesterday for hot days too?
     
    #1
  2. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    I imagine that if you can find out the Thermal Coefficient of Expansion for nylon (seeing as most strings are nylon based) then it would be too hard to calculate the difference in tension you would need to string.
     
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  3. devilish_duke

    devilish_duke Semi-Pro

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    I think heat and humidity affect natural gut much more than they affect synthetic strings. Am I right here?
     
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  4. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    I guess when we say that heat and humidity affect gut we are refering to the detrimental effect on gut of such exposure.
    And when we say that higher temperature has effect on nylon, we just refer to perfectly working condition (to some extent of course) when the string gains in power when temperature increases.
    Pros always have their racquets strung taking temperature into consideration.

    It wouldn't possible to calculate of course, but I am sure there are some practical guidelines.
     
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  5. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    The obvious guidelines are the higher the temperature the higher the tension and the lower the temp the lower the tension.....I'm not sure what others there may be.

    I did some searching on the web for the various properties of Nylon and calculated a tension differential of about 1.4 lbf for a 35*F difference (100*F to 65*F) but that doesn't seem to make a lot of sense to me just yet so I will keep trying.
     
    #5
  6. jbs24

    jbs24 Rookie

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    Polymers are not too sensitive to temperature unless you are around their 'glass transition temperature', basically the point at which plastics go from soft and pliable to hard and brittle. Most nylons will go well above 150C before they become mushy. Of course they will stretch more if you stick it in boiling water, but above 150C they can really start to melt and stretch.

    How does temperature effect how the ball bounces? Maybe that's what feels like more control at low temperature. The ball just doesn't go as far or bounce as much.
     
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  7. smittysan89

    smittysan89 Professional

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    when the temperature is colder the ball loses its bounce and becomes flat it loses pressure. So im assuming that in colder weather you would want to string higher to account for tension loss.
     
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  8. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    That's interesting info.
    But as the previous poster has indicated, we have a confusion here whether we should increase or decrease tension on, say, hot days.

    As my experience has indicated we have to INCREASE tension on hot days to retain same control.
     
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  9. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    ...and that is exactly what I said....let me rephrase it...

    when the temperature is high you want to string at high tension.

    when the temperature is low you want to string at low tension.
     
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