Tennis court size I should build

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by vamike, Feb 14, 2010.

  1. vamike

    vamike Guest

    My boys, 13 and 12, are taking lessons and doing very well. This spring I’m building a multi-sport court in the back yard. Here’s my dilemma:

    I cannot afford a multi-court including a full size tennis court (78x27/36 requiring a full multi-court slab at ~120x60). My planned slab is 84x50 but I can adjust a bit if needed. My builder recommends a “short court”. I’ve researched and see that a singles “short court” or “QuickStart” court is 60x21/27. This would fit fine on my 84x50 slab, however, should I go slightly larger to get as close to official size as possible? My conern about an “in between” size is QuickStart courts are designed for low compression balls, so with something sized in between, like say 66x24/30, am I in no man’s land? (i.e. court too big for low compression balls but too small for regular balls). Is this a moot point because anything smaller than regulation will screw up my kids development no matter what?

    I appreciate any advice on what size tennis court to build.

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
    #1
  2. dlk

    dlk Hall of Fame

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    Do 'em right & at least build regulation size if you have room. Your last sentence is correct. I mean if you're gonna spend that kind of money, you can find a solution to build regulation.
     
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  3. Vyse

    Vyse Semi-Pro

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    Why waste money on a short court? That would suck to not have it full. I would figure out a way to get that court regulation size.
     
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  4. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    If it's a matter of money, I would give serious consideration to waiting until you can afford a full court, particularly if your boys are going to play tennis when they get into HS.

    If I had decided to go with a short court, it would have been a total waste of $ since my son (15) is now playing "big boy tennis" (NTRP 4.0-4.5) and plans on playing on the varsity team (assuming he makes the cut).
     
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  5. ALten1

    ALten1 Rookie

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    Is tennis their sport of choice? If so, and you have the room and money I recommend a full court. If you ever decide to move can you get your investment back?
     
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  6. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    Yet another consideration...good point Alten1.
     
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  7. ALten1

    ALten1 Rookie

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    Does your courts get much play? I know they do when first put in but after a year or two do they still get played on?
     
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  8. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    I made the decision to not put a court in. We considered a number of options and examined the investment and payback (note that we're in New England) compared to the other options. At the end of the day, it didn't add up in favor of putting a court in.

    The more compelling options were lit clay courts 5 minutes from the house for $150 family membership for the outdoor season (no court fees), and 6 indoor courts where my son works ($300 annual membership fee payed for by my company and $0 court fees for my son and whoever he hits with). If you do the math, you can't justify even a short court, let alone a full sized one.
     
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  9. hollywood9826

    hollywood9826 Semi-Pro

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    If it must be in your yard then full size or nothing. A small one they will outgrow too quick and never even use the thing as a tennis court.
     
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  10. papatenis

    papatenis Semi-Pro

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    Just build a sports court. I grew up with a tennis court, but really never used it. Only time I used it was to hit with our ball machine. Just like a swimming pool, does not really get used...
     
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  11. ALten1

    ALten1 Rookie

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    I think you made a wise decision. I can see a court getting a lot of use the first six months to year but after that barely any. I would miss my grass after a couple of months.
     
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  12. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    You must have some tough high schools there! 4.0-4.5 is a pretty strong player.

    That's a pretty sweet deal. Is he a stringer? How old is he?


    Also, about your PB10 mid, how did you feel on it regarding the serve? did it take some time to get used to?
     
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  13. cucio

    cucio Legend

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    You could build a grass court :)
     
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  14. kingdaddy41788

    kingdaddy41788 Hall of Fame

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    I would also say full size if you can afford it. It just wouldn't be practical to have it any other way...
     
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  15. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    Absolutely brutal.... they have won states and districts for the past 4 years in a row, going undefeated the whole way. Their #1 is nationally ranked....not sure where but he's awfully good. My son will be fortunate as a freshman to make the team.
     
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  16. albino smurf

    albino smurf Professional

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    At 12 ad 13 I'd think you'd build regulation or not at all.
     
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  17. vamike

    vamike Guest

    The overwhelming advice here is all or nothing, so... if I do build a full size court, what would be the minimum hardcourt distance beyond the baseline? Could I get away with say 10' on each end (meaning a 98' long slab) then add another 11' of mulch to each end, providing 21' total baseline to fence distance?

    Thanks for everyone's advice.

    Mike
     
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  18. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    10' is not anywhere close to enough backcourt. That's a common mistake (and one that isn't easily fixed) when people build private single courts - not enough room to the back or to the sides. You should be thinking at least 15'. The problem with the mulch solution is that someone can end up turning an ankle really bad where the court ends and the mulch begins.
     
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  19. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    I remember watching a show on The Tennis Channel profiling Sam Querrery. He grew up with a court in his yard (in California). He commented that he hardly ever played on it!

    Unless where you live makes it difficult, I would think the tennis exposure at a club would be greater. Wider variety of competition, chance to watch others, learn from others, pick up games, etc.

    Granted, you have 2 kids of similar age so they can always play each other. I guess a question would be what are your goals for the court? Are they interested in developing as tennis players?...or are you just looking to have a fun area for them to play around? Are they more interested in basketball or other things incorporated into the court?

    If they do get serious about tennis, I don't think they will be inviting other serious players back to their house to play on a small court?

    They seem to be getting pretty old for quickstart tennis?...and small court dimensions? Unless the idea is just to knock the ball around and have some fun...which is of course fine.

    Hope it works out for you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2010
    #19

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