Tennis Courts - cost of a personal court

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by ironicqueery, Mar 30, 2007.

  1. ironicqueery

    ironicqueery Rookie

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    I'm interested in having a tennis court built in my backyard. Does anyone have experience building their own court (either yourself, or having a company do it for you)?

    If so, what did you use, costs, etc?

    (i hope a tennis court counts as equipment...wasn't sure where to put this thread)
     
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  2. Buckeye10s

    Buckeye10s Banned

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    Courts usually run between $30-40k, depending on how fancy you want to get.
     
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  3. rhcolt07

    rhcolt07 New User

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    EDIT: Deleted
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2007
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  4. soggyramen

    soggyramen Professional

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    my parents want a clay court for me in my backyard does anyone know how much that will cost...i'm sure it's more
     
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  5. BstonBruin

    BstonBruin New User

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    probably around 60k
     
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  6. KingOfTennis

    KingOfTennis Professional

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    very expensive it is. Die u must
     
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  7. tennis_hand

    tennis_hand Hall of Fame

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    why clay? A hard court is probably cheaper.
     
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  8. swuster

    swuster New User

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    Clay courts must be constantly serviced, because even a little wind can blow a LOT of clay away from the surface. The price really adds up.
     
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  9. brayman9

    brayman9 Semi-Pro

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    do what my friend did tare up the grass dig a little put in concrete, put up a fake net and stray paint line on. $300.
     
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  10. jamauss

    jamauss Hall of Fame

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    What exactly is a "fake" net?
     
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  11. soggyramen

    soggyramen Professional

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    we decided to just get a hard court now because it tends to get windy where i live
     
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  12. Bogie

    Bogie Hall of Fame

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    my coach built a red clay court in his backyard and if i remember correctly, including nice fencing, it will run you about 45-50 grand.
     
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  13. rhcolt07

    rhcolt07 New User

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    I'm taking a guess, but I think he means just take a piece of string and put it as high as you want.
    Oh and make sure you have good fencing like Bogie said so your balls don't fly all over your neighbor's yards.
     
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  14. iplaybetter

    iplaybetter Hall of Fame

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    behind you, but i have to be somewhere else by the
    you are all so lucky my parents would never put a court in my back yard let alone hire the person who is basically my coach as a proper coach
     
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  15. TokyopunK

    TokyopunK Professional

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    I have an asphault basketball court in my back yard, it cost around 2k.
     
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  16. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    Is there a reason why one would want to shell out more money to build a clay court instead of a hard court? It's more expensive and dirtier and requires more maintenance, isn't it?

    I always assumed that clay courts were built because it used to be less expensive than hard courts. And perhaps in the old days, the technology wasn't there to build hard courts more easily. So perhaps people got used to the playing characteristics of the clay courts all this time so it stuck with them. But maybe I'm wrong.
     
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  17. Tennis4203

    Tennis4203 Rookie

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    I Want A Tennis Court In My Backyard :'(
     
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  18. Peter Szucs

    Peter Szucs Semi-Pro

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    I want a backyard... lol
     
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  19. Mr. Blond

    Mr. Blond Professional

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    I am currently building a new home, and in the process will be adding a hard court in the back yard.

    The court construction itself is around 15k for the concrete and surface. The fencing and lighting is around another 15k. The concrete costs so much because you have to do a post tensioned slab, which adds some cost. Post tensioning is essentially like prestressing the concrete to prevent splits from opening up. I am sure the prices vary depending on location and bells and whistles though.
     
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  20. KingOfTennis

    KingOfTennis Professional

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    i have a backyard but its on an angle and my pool basically takes up most of the space.
     
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  21. Lindros13

    Lindros13 Semi-Pro

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    Someone at my club has a HAR-TRU court (the green clay kind, for those that don't know) at his house in NJ. I don't know his initial cost but he said it cost more than his house when he had it put in! (and he has a pretty nice house.) Granted, the tennis court is spectacular, with nice brickwork around the one side, nice fencing, nice watering system, and the court installation probably required removal of trees and who knows what else. He's also had the court for years so house prices weren't as high as they are now. But again, I don't know what the initial cost was.

    I've heard him mention that his annual maintenance cost is about $1,500 per year. He basically pays this to a guy who then takes care of laying down 75 (or so) bags of har-tru each year, rolling it out, putting up the net, nailing down the lines, and any other basic necessay items. If the lines require replacement, there is an additional cost, but not too significant I don't think. His court has a built-in aboveground watering system, of which I don't know the maintenance costs, if any. I've seen some courts that have below-ground watering systems, and I presume these are expensive. I was taking a lesson on a har-tru court in Florida a couple of months ago and the instructor mentioned that it was actually "watering" the court while we were playing! Pretty neat I thought.
     
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  22. PlayTheClay

    PlayTheClay New User

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    Actually Har-Tru courts cost less than asphalt courts to install in most markets. Where are you guys located? I am in the construction business and can give you some ballpark numbers.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2007
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  23. PeakXV

    PeakXV New User

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    That sounds good because in the NorthEast where I am the Asphalt will crack once the frost & -30c temps get at it .... at least all the roads do. :(

    Would be interested in a ballpark breakdown of the costs or percentages. For example.

    Surface Preparation - Grading.
    Har-Tru Green Goop/Clay
    Extras - Nets/Lines/Dragger etc.
    Fencing
    Lighting
    Sprinkler Watering system

    Anybody got an idea for approx. figures?
     
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  24. gmonfils

    gmonfils Rookie

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    Har-Tru courts generally cost less then hard courts. In fact if you are doing it yourself then har-tru is the least expensive. Tennis Magazine had an article several years back on one of there writers who built there own court and the price breakdown and how to, etc.
     
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  25. austro

    austro Professional

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    I am contemplating it too but wanted originally a synthetic grass/astro turf one. Basically because it is very easy maintenance and I can't stand HC. My prefered one would be clay because it is just so nice to play on but the maintenance is a major deterrent.

    The I played on this artifical clay surface in an indoor place and absolutely loved it. I have found this one on the web:

    http://www.classicclay.com/

    but am wondering if anyone knows any other suppliers? It seems that you get the best of both worlds with this. Alhtough I might still do the Astro since we have clay courts not too far away...
     
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  26. phucng_10

    phucng_10 Professional

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    Tell me about it... :sad:
     
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  27. chrisx

    chrisx New User

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    There's plenty of room at my grandpa's farm. He's got a tractor and a bunch of other equipment. I was curious if you are willing to do the work yourself, it would be possible to build a clay court...
     
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  28. tenniskid3119

    tenniskid3119 Semi-Pro

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    my parents said they would build one right next to out house 'cause we have a lot next to it, but we dont have the money, it would cost 20 grand; excluding the cost of tearing down the trees and crap.
     
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  29. i wish i had a backyard too..:(
     
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  30. Mr. Blond

    Mr. Blond Professional

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    I don't have exact figures on costs of each component yet, but I am about to start construction on my hard court. The slab itselt is unique in the way that it is made. Normal concrete slabs just have reebar (metal rods) running through them to strengthen the concrete. This is all well and fine, but can crack and split. For a tennis court, you must use post tensioned concrete. This is a process of running cables through the concrete before it cures and tensioning the cables to like 30 thousand pounds when the concrete is cured. This keeps the inevitable cracks in the concrete from being visible or destroying the surface.

    The post tensioned slab that I will be doing (60 x 120) will cost me right about 13k for the concrete forms, concrete and post tensioning.

    The lighting I am not installing now for cost reasons.

    The fencing is around 4k unless you decide to put vinyl coated which is much more expensive.

    The surfacing cost between 3-7k in my area depending on what type of play characteristics you want. I am installing a slow surface because hard courts speed up over time. Slow surfaces tend to have more longevity.

    I know you asked about har-tru, but trust me, the maintenence on them is a bear so hard courts are much more cost effective over time. Unless of course you have someone you can pay to water, repair, brush and pack them everyday.

    I hople this helps.
     
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  31. PeakXV

    PeakXV New User

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    Thanks blabit - excellent information. Hardcourts are not out of the question for us yet - and the maintanence free carrot dangling is very alluring.

    Also played a couple of years back on the Astro-turf with the sandy pebbles atop at a Hyatt hotel ..... it was enjoyable actually but don't know what kind of a subgrade and/or under surface is required.

    Lights are not a necessity and have even toyed with the idea of increasing the court size to 80 by 140 in order to plant a natural cedar hedge around it with fish net or something similar drapped around the inside. The extra 10 feet for root & shadow control - Cedar being free for the digging around these parts ...... anything to get the cost down a few $1000 ;)
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2007
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  32. Andres

    Andres G.O.A.T.

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    In Argentina, a claycourt costs 25,000 pesos, which are around 8,039 USD. A hardcourt is probably cheaper to build.
     
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  33. SalvadorVeiga

    SalvadorVeiga Rookie

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    Really ? That cheap ? well it's not cheap comparing the average GDP per capita but it's cheap actually... I wish those prices weren't too off from Portugal either... but I think that is a dream of my own... I want to build a tennis court also here when I get the chance...don't know the costs though... here in Europe...
     
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  34. Serve 'em hard

    Serve 'em hard Banned

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    I don't notice the hard courts in the Northeast having cracking problems, and unlike clay/har tru, you can play them on them all winter long as long as there isn't snow or ice on 'em. Never seen anyone play on har-tru in the winter, but people, myself included, play plenty of outdoor tennis on the warmer days on public hard courts. (Thank God for global warming!)

    Hard court's tougher on the body though....
     
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  35. Serve 'em hard

    Serve 'em hard Banned

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    Why didn't you just cut the grass to save on the cost of the concrete and have yourself a fancy grass court instead?

    Why don't people build more private grass courts? Anyone know the economics and logistics of that?
     
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  36. PeakXV

    PeakXV New User

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    With Moisture ..... freezing ..... thawing .....freezing ..... cracks and heaving definitely do happen at times ..... probably best to have an Engineer do some soil testing on the choosen site and/or pray that the temperature/moisture situation doesn't have any major or wild fluxuations that would cause unusual stress on the surface and supporting ground structure.
     
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  37. LarougeNY

    LarougeNY Professional

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    Are you guys sure about the prices of a hard court? I kept asking my dad for it a while ago and he said it would cost around 80 grand, maybe more, so I stopped asking (knowing thats a lot of money, and I'm the only person that plays in the family)

    Anyone know how much a decent hardcourt with fencing and lights would cost in the north east region, like in NY?
     
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  38. ibringtheHEAT

    ibringtheHEAT Semi-Pro

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    My friend's uncle (yeah a little far from me) got a court for just under 50,000 of course this is in Texas where open flat land is all over the place......

    I'm sure you could get something for under 60,000 if you have the land........which dependant on where in NY you are might be hard.
     
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  39. JZImmer123

    JZImmer123 Rookie

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    Awww, I was hoping to get a tennis court built in my backyard (once I get a backyard). I was thinking I wouldn't have to spend more than 5k. So much for that idea. Maybe if I hit the lottery. It could happen!
     
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  40. Serve 'em hard

    Serve 'em hard Banned

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    Around 80 grand, maybe more.
     
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  41. JeffCyner

    JeffCyner New User

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    I am going to purchase a property in Sydney within the next 12 months and I will make sure the backyard can accommodate a Tennis Court. For me the best surface is clearly artificial grass as I am going to add some golf holes. In this way I will be able to use the court as my personal putting range. Also I want to be able to raise the net so the court becomes a volleyball court. Or I can remove the net and the court becomes a mini soccer field. Of course you can do this with other surfaces but I don't want my future kids running and falling on a hard court or clay court.

    The thought of playing tennis at night is not appealing so I will not install lighting. As for fencing I like the idea of using drop fencing which is so much cheaper and I think looks nice if done correctly. I will not skimp on the rest of the court. Hopefully I can get my wish list done for about $AUD45,000 (about $USD37,000).
     
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  42. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    You meant "Thank human for global warming!"??? lol
     
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  43. soyizgood

    soyizgood G.O.A.T.

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    What's the going rate for a court with carpet?
     
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  44. Serve 'em hard

    Serve 'em hard Banned

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    I don't know. But I question the validity of your signature regarding women.
     
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  45. austro

    austro Professional

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    What is 'drop fencing'?
     
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  46. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    [​IMG]
    Classic Clay sounds really good. Does it really 'slide' like real clay?
    ANyone here know?
     
    #46
  47. classic tennis

    classic tennis Semi-Pro

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    Contact Har - Tru they are great to deal with.
     
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  48. JeffCyner

    JeffCyner New User

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    It's also known as Draw Curtain fencing. If done correctly it can look good and is cheaper than traditional fencing. Another benefit is that it can be drawn open. If you have a dog in back yard though probably not a good idea. http://www.multisports.com.au/upload/p_Tennis_Court_Draw_Nets.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2007
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  49. raspell38120

    raspell38120 New User

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    Slice, I am in the process of putting in a court south of Cancun. I was all set to go clay even though the maintenance, language barrier and periods of non-use is a problem. I talked to a pro today who has one Clay Tech court in Georgia and is taking out two courts that he was originally going to go to Hydracourt but instead is using Clay Tech. He says he waters them 4 minutes at night, adds magnesium which really seems to keep them moist. He gave a lesson to a guy from Florida who didn't realize until after the hit that the court was not real clay. That's actually hard to believe. I'm going down to play it May 23.

    there are other brands coming to America also. One is NovaCourt and I forget the other one that is from Australia. These courts have been out about 10 years and are catching on. I have not priced it yet but will have in 3 weeks. In a perfect world I would just put down clay. Most people say this new court is a little faster and bounces lower. This pro did not agree with that. He couldn't have been more pleased and talked of groups that prefer it over real clay. The other advantage is the 2 months of winter they have to shut down for freezing. There don't shut down for that. I also talked to a pro at Boulders north of Phoenix. He had good things also to say.

    As to court cost, my court in Mexico will cost right at $45,000. That does not include fencing as I am doing something other than fencing included in my home price. Obviously labor is cheaper down there but cost of materials are more expensive. it is somewhat of a trade-off.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2007
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  50. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    raspell, that's a nice testimonial, man, thanks. Definitely keep us posted. I am really, really interested in this. Now to just convince my wife that we do not need a pool.;)
     
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