Tennis Courts - cost of a personal court

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by ironicqueery, Mar 30, 2007.

  1. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

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    good bump. I love this thread too.

    I may go in for a ranch/farm house and build a grass court someday :)
     
  2. Jtruong70

    Jtruong70 New User

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    Haha yeah, this thread is very interesting
     
  3. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

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    I play at public courts which has stadium seating and a club like atmosphere. ~100-200 guys have yearly membership and it is easy to pick up a match. Last year I paid $150 for the year. Kids under 18 are free. This year, my total may be $300 for the year. Transportation is expensive (about $500) since I live about 10 miles away. So about $800 totally a year, or $15K over 20 years.

    Playing at public courts is still cheaper than building a court, and you cannot put a $$ amount on the club like atmosphere. I have 6-8 high school and public courts, which are free, and within a mile of me, but I choose to go to these courts which are 10 miles away. Atmosphere is very important.

    On the other hand, private tennis club memberships are typically $250 per person per month and about $300-350 per family per month.. so totally 3000-4000 per year or more. Here the total costs are comparable over the years.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2010
  4. AlexDK09

    AlexDK09 Guest

    Membership fee: About $100
    Transportation: $0 (I go by bike:, maybe costs for food as fuel :D)

    For me building a court won't save me any money.
     
  5. Parker512

    Parker512 Guest

    I have a huge long chiken cupe in my backyard use to be a chicken farm where 30 workers worked. dimensions like 30ft wide and long as 300ft. Cement floor nice and smooth sort of. Do you think i could paint lines put up a net and have a ball machine on the other side feeding me balls or my tennis partner. roof is like 8ft and sinking oh the roof we think might leak.
     
  6. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

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    I think it is too narrow (singles 27 ft and doubles 36 ft). If it were 50 ft wide , you could squeeze in 3 tennis courts, start up an indoor club, and make money :)
     
  7. polski

    polski Semi-Pro

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    That would work. It's too narrow to play a regulation match on, but sounds great for practicing.

    You won't have much room to swing with that low of a ceiling height, but no reason you can't have a machine feeding you groundstrokes.

    The floor might not bounce as "true" as a hard court since the floor is so smooth, but if you put enough topspin on the ball machine, it could jump the ball up to you.
     
  8. cmb

    cmb Semi-Pro

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    I was thinking of doing something similar to this. My parents are considering buying a house with some acreage on it. I was considering basically digging it out 3-5 inches and filling it with material for the baseball infield, and then rolling it out and then adding a little bit of clay on the surface.

    obviously it wont look like a professional hartrue court. but if it functions and bounces reasonably, im up for it. me and my brothers would do the labor on it.

    I read somewhere that a baseball infield could be done for like 2 to 5k.

    but if its cheaper I would be up for a "dirt" court too
     
  9. PeterPanda

    PeterPanda Semi-Pro

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    If i had a level peice of land and pored concrete down and then just put a net up and painted lines would that be okay.
     
  10. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    thats what i was thinking. it wouldnt be really ok, but it would suffice. viva tennisssssssssssss
     
  11. Rorsach

    Rorsach Hall of Fame

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    At least reinforce the concrete with a rebar mat. If you don't the slab will crack within weeks.
     
  12. autumn_leaf

    autumn_leaf Hall of Fame

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    having a personal tennis court, bet that's a personal dream/goal for many of us on this board.

    i would love to have a clay one for indoors, not outdoors. i hate it when weather or daylight gets in the way. roof would be like plastic though to let in sunlight.

    anyone know how much that would cost? either way i'm assuming i need to be fairly rich to get enough land for this project... like the other poster, maybe in 15-20 years lol.
     
  13. Alistair23

    Alistair23 New User

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    I've been thinking about constructing an indoor tennis court for a little while now, because of the sheer lack of facilities in my area.

    It will cost a lot. I'm guessing here in the UK, an indoor court with a hard surface will cost in the region of £70,000 - £100,000.

    In terms of building an outdoor court, it isn't as difficult or as costly.

    1. Firstly you would have to find suitable flat land. By suitable I mean doesn't go all over the place and isn't surrounded by trees and plants (because of the roots). Space is key here folks.

    2. Once suitable land has been found, and remember it must be away from trees especially, you need to measure out the exact dimensions of the court. Remember to include space to run either side of the doubles court.

    3. After measuring the court dimensions, the next step is to start digging. After doing research, it looks like you will have to dig between a foot and a foot + 1/2.

    4. Once you have dug your ditch, it is imperative that it is flat, but even more importantly it is level. If you use a level to measure, this will help.

    5. Concrete slabs are were you will start. It will ensure that once you pour concrete on the slabs, it will remain flat and level. Make sure they are compact together side by side.

    6. This is where it gets tricky. I am unsure how much concrete to pour onto the slabs because of two things.

    A) If you don't reinforce the concrete it will start to crack within a month or two.

    B) Irrigation. When it rains or snows, the court surface (concrete if you're not using a proper surface) will be ruined. You need to make sure you find a way to allow water to run off.

    7. This is where I am stuck. Once I pour the concrete, I am unsure as to whether to pour Tar to stick to it and then apply a surface finish.


    This is where I am upto on my research.
     
  14. eliza

    eliza Guest

    Clayis much cheaper than hard. If you do it yourself you can lower the cost.
    Whomever says 30-40K does not know construction guys. Of course they mark up 200%..................check the versa-court kit, and go to home depot.
     
  15. Carolina Racquet

    Carolina Racquet Hall of Fame

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    Autumn, I've looked into this and you need to consider a couple of things..

    First, Indoor Clay (Har-Tru) courts are problematic because in an indoor environment, it tends to get very hard and you have condensation/mold/moisture issues without the ventilation you can only get outdoors. I spoke to an owner of an indoor facility that tried clay and he replaced it within a couple of years.

    One solution to the clay is Har-Tru's ClayTech surface. It's actually a textured turf-like carpet and you dress the top with har-tru material. It plays similar to clay, you can slide like clay and it takes very little water to maintain. Downside is it's more $$. You're looking at around $70,000 per court.

    For the structure, you nailed it to look at a tensioned-fabric structure. It does allow light through and construction costs are less than a traditional steel structure. Downside there is you need to replace the material every 15 - 20 years or so. Usually costs $12 -16 per square foot, so for a 60x 120 facility, you're looking at around $100,000 to $120,000.
     
  16. autumn_leaf

    autumn_leaf Hall of Fame

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    thank you for all the info. main reason i'm looking at clay is because my body is pretty rickety now (i'm only 21...yea i know, young, but trust me, rickety) and is probably only going to get worse in the future.

    i was doing a little research now and read that clay needed to be watered and knew there would most likely be mold problems (currently in Hong Kong for vacation and family wants me to move here and it's really humid during most of the year).

    i was probably expecting 40k-60k for construction so hearing 100k+ is disheartening. There was just a thread created about versacourts and i'm pretty interested in that as an alternative as long as it's better on the joints than hard courts. you seem to know a lot about this type of stuff so i'm wondering if you have any experience with them? i estimate on their basketball court prices (with the number / size of tiles) that it would run about 15k for a court.
     
  17. Carolina Racquet

    Carolina Racquet Hall of Fame

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    I have no experience with the versacourts for playing tennis... only played basketball on them inside (plastic tiles...right?)

    You might want to consider the cushioned hard courts. Omni Court is an option and if you search them, you can see more about their construction process and the level of cushioning on their web site. Again, you're looking at a higher cost compared to asphalt hard courts but you won't have the clay-oriented issues indoors.
     
  18. PeterPanda

    PeterPanda Semi-Pro

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    How much would that cost?
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2011
  19. Carolina Racquet

    Carolina Racquet Hall of Fame

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    Just to be specific, you shouldn't put down actual Concrete. Asphalt is the material that's applied over a base of crushed material. Much cheaper and much more give than Concrete.

    Interesting story... my old girlfriend's father made an outdoor court in their backyard and it was GREAT! He was pretty "industrial" and did most of the work himself other than the laying of the concrete. Saved him a bunch of money. Ahh memories.
     
  20. Alchemy-Z

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    LOL hell I wish i had room for a ping pong table.
     
  21. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    In my teenage years I helped build a few clay courts. Getting the net posts in was not much fun. Putting each nail in the lines with the sun beating on my neck was not so great either. Carrying huge bags of clay all day was a back breaker. Playing on a virgin clay court made it all worth it though.
     
  22. PeterPanda

    PeterPanda Semi-Pro

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    How much does Asphalt cost.
     
  23. Alistair23

    Alistair23 New User

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    Spoke to my father today about this and he had different methods altogether.

    I will be God willing hopefully be building a tennis court for the Summer, what surface is beyond me right now, but it looks as if it's either hard court or grass.

    My father kicked my concrete idea out the window. Said I'd have to use some sort of clay, compact it and then use asphalt.

    Back to the drawing board I guess.
     
  24. PeterPanda

    PeterPanda Semi-Pro

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    Grass is very expensive almost as much as a house.
     
  25. Alistair23

    Alistair23 New User

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    Where I come from grass is free bud. :wink:
     
  26. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Rather than building your own courts, consider finding a nice neighborhood that has its own courts and moving there. We have two unlit but very nice and well-maintained courts in our neighborhood that are a 4 minute walk from my house even while pulling my ball machine. There is also a neighborhood pool next to the courts. Hardly anyone uses the courts and I think in over ten years living in the neighborhood there have only been about two times I went up there and wasn't able to use either court right away.

    It it much easier to have someone else do your court maintenance and upkeep, not to mention not having to fork over the initial costs of construction. All the upkeep costs for the neighborhood are including in the yearly neighborhood dues of about $350 which also covers lawn care, insurance, etc.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2011
  27. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Maybe a tree house.
     
  28. PeterPanda

    PeterPanda Semi-Pro

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    You cant use regular grass from outside.Everyone knows that.has to be a special kind.
     
  29. PeterPanda

    PeterPanda Semi-Pro

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    profeshinally done grass court and upkeep for the season is around $200,000.
     
  30. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    What is crack like?
     
  31. autumn_leaf

    autumn_leaf Hall of Fame

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    given that price it's really no wonder why there are so few grass tournaments these days.
     
  32. PeterPanda

    PeterPanda Semi-Pro

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    Flex court has a package where it costs only $12,000 can an asphalt cort beat that price?
     
  33. B A Y

    B A Y Rookie

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    [​IMG]

    My court cost R140000 ($20000) Building is cheap here... Here it is after a massive hail storm!
     
  34. Dags

    Dags Professional

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  35. tedmeister

    tedmeister Rookie

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    I want one too. Preferably clay. Easier on the old joints.
     
  36. PeterPanda

    PeterPanda Semi-Pro

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    How much would it have cost if you had no lights.
     
  37. B A Y

    B A Y Rookie

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    I went for the expensive lights ... without them it would have been $14000.
     
  38. walkman

    walkman New User

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    Very nice! It looks like you spent extra for a retaining wall and fencing too.
     
  39. B A Y

    B A Y Rookie

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    No no... retaining wall is the edge of my property.. and I think I got shafted on the fencing because they seem a little lower then the fences at my tennis club..
     
  40. B A Y

    B A Y Rookie

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    What am I saying... Duh! The retaining wall was just part of the price.. its pretty cool... The precast wall is the edge of the property.. I am annoyed that I didn't make the guy build the court right up to the precast wall! then I would have had an extra meter and a half all around the court! Its kind of wasted space!
     
  41. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    What about grass courts ? Wouldn't it be easy to just mow the lawn reallly close and do a chulrk line and put up the net on your own. Maybe only around $800 total.:)
     
  42. PlayTheClay

    PlayTheClay New User

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    ClayTech Costs


    The $70k number for ClayTech is very rich. Prices depend on if the court is new or are we converting an existing court, the price of asphalt and concrete, etc. As General Manager of Har-Tru Sports, I can only speak to the clay court world with great certainty, but I can assure you that in most markets, Har-Tru Clay Courts should be priced very comparably, if not less expensive than hard courts.

    If I can help with pricing and pointing you to a reputable builder (we do not build), please call me at 1-877-4-HAR-TRU and ask for Randy.

    Good Luck!!!
     
  43. alancalan

    alancalan Rookie

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    Probably, a good question to ask would be, if you become your own general contractor, what would the cost of the materials be. You need a licensed electrician to run power for the lights, you need a plumber or a sprinkler guy to set up the watering if you do har-tru, you may have to clear away trees (here that is about $1,000 a tree) and you have to remove its roots, not just file it down.

    Since we have someone here from Har-Tru, what would the cost of the Har Tru materials be and what has to go underneath it? As other have said there may be big rocks to remove and you need heavy equipment to do a good leveling job, I assume.

    You also have to determine what the increase will be to your RE tax and school taxes because they are based upon the assessed valuation. I'd bet around here, a court would that would be valued at $40,000 would raise the taxes by $500 to $1,000 per year.

    So, The basic materials costs and the costs of the electrician, the sprinkler person (preferably the one who knows your current sprinkler system so there are no conflicts for water demand and no holes made in the existing lines) and the taxes are where you have to start. You have to survey where you are going to put it this 120 x 60 court, decide how the grading will be.

    The economy is awful and there should be people around looking to work for a pretty cheap wage.

    However, as the general contractor, you will need to know what has to be done, as there will be nobody else to fall back on.

    Alan
     
  44. terry doran

    terry doran New User

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    Cost of Artificial Grass layed over excisting cracked hard courts

    I am looking for ball park figures per court to lay artifical grass over excisting cracked asphalt courts?
     
  45. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Did you just wake up from suspended animation? You have got to have set the record for most time between registering on the forum and making your first post! You are the super lurker!

    I don't know about artificial grass but you might be interested in looking at this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRUwrgknSI0 which is about ClayTech, a hybrid of hard courts and clay courts. You convert a hard court into a ClayTech court.
     
  46. Rozroz

    Rozroz Legend

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    WOW!!
    just went through this thread and couldn't believe it!
    you bunch of rich people you!
    building a personal court...
    you have to be close to a millionaire to build and maintain your own court (+ the property itself).
    lucky *******s!
     
  47. mmk

    mmk Professional

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    When I was in high school in Colorado in the 70s, I played against Cherry Creek, who were perennial state champs. CC was one of, if not the, richest public school districts in the country. The family of every guy on the CC team had their own court. I on the other hand had to figure out how to come up with enough money to pay for a racquet.
     
  48. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    the distribution of wealth in this country is astounding.....
     
  49. Staidhup

    Staidhup New User

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    Retired, old and gray, looking to build a HarTru clay court on our property in Reno. What would such a project cost to construct and maintain, the land is level.
     

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