Tennis Drills for serve & backhand

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Tiberius, Jul 25, 2009.

  1. Tiberius

    Tiberius Banned

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    Any suggestions for some tennis drills for your serve & backhand while practising all by yourself? I know the backboard can be used for backhand and just use a ball hopper & serve as many balls as you can but what are the finer points you need to keep in mind while practising alone to make your session more effective?
     
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  2. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    This is a pretty open ended question. It's probably best to go to fuzzyyellowballs.com to collect your tip techniques (the "finer points" as you put it) for the serve and backhand and just get out on the courts to practice them.

    I wouldn't drill your backhand against a backboard for too long. You'll almost need a ball machine or somebody feeding you balls on a real court to get the proper drills for your strokes.
     
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  3. SethIMcClaine

    SethIMcClaine Rookie

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    I agree with Volusiano, fyb.com has a good break down on serves. one of the things that sticks out and ive heard other people mention is working on the toss, you dont even have to be at a court for that one.

    As far as backboards... I hate them in general! They are very unrealistic in bounce and return rate.
     
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  4. pmata814

    pmata814 Professional

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    I hate backboards/walls. The ball comes back at you so fast you have to rush to set up and I sometimes feel that would do more harm than good by creating bad habits.

    As far as the serve is concerned, I like to keep score of some kind. Depending on your ability level you could first start by just trying to get it in the box at first. Count ?/10 you make and write down the percentage so you can compare them later in the week or month to see if you've improved. When you're good at that take a rope and split the box down the middle. Do the same for each half of the box. When you get better split the box in 3 (this is where I'm at now).

    Ofcourse you don't have to follow this exactly but it's just to give you an idea. Sometimes I want to just practice serving to my opponents backhand so I'll set up a rope outlining that part of the box and just practice hitting that target for that day. But I always try to keep track of what percentage of serves I'm getting in. Always make sure you practice on both deuce and ad side of the court. Hope this helps.
     
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  5. textbook strokes

    textbook strokes Semi-Pro

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    The wall is a great tool. If the ball comes so fast, just hit softer.
     
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  6. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    It depends on your level. If you're a beginner and just want to work on being able to simply make contact with the ball and get a return back, then the wall is OK.

    But as soon as you can consistently keep a rally of a few more balls against a wall, you'll want to work on height to clear the net and pace to keep the ball in play. The wall is no good for that because you just can't tell if you have enough pace or too much pace.
     
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