Tennis Elbow and Strings?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by joe49n, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. joe49n

    joe49n New User

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    Many, many years ago I had a bad case of tennis elbow. I gave up tennis for almost a year. I switched to a very light racquet, the Volkl Catapult 3. It was great. No more tennis elbow. About a year ago I started using Dunlop Sport Explosive Hybrid 16 gauge strings. I don't know if it is coincidence, but my tennis elbow is back, not as bad as I had it before. Is it possible that certain strings are worse than others for tennis elbow? If so, what string type, brand, etc., is used by people with tennis elbow that is helping them?
     
    #1
  2. hisrob777

    hisrob777 Rookie

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    Soft polys in a hybrid with a multi filament. Or full multifilament. If your level is improving you may want a heavier racquet.
     
    #2
  3. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    What's the string tension? Should be on the lower range, mid to high 40's, for people with tender tendons.
     
    #3
  4. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Ditch polyester strings if your arm hurts.
     
    #4
  5. LiBai1

    LiBai1 New User

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    You can probably get good answers by posting the question in the String's board.
     
    #5
  6. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I can already tell you everything the String board will say:

    1. Try natural gut
    2. Try soft multifilaments
    3. Poly is bad
    4. Poly isn't that bad if you string it low.
    5. It's not the strings, it's your bad form.
    6. Why don't you just hit the ball in the sweetspot every time!
     
    #6
  7. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    Second this. I fully blame Luxillon for the creaking in my wrist and the occasional pop in my elbow. As much as I loved the performance of poly, I'm in a synthetic gut/multi filament hybrid for the foreseeable future.
     
    #7
  8. 3fees

    3fees Hall of Fame

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    Strength train your arms,,also pronation/supination exercises,,be advised its years of exercises.
     
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  9. PeteD

    PeteD Hall of Fame

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    My arm was literally in a sling, then lowering tension worked. Also, don't let your strings get old, and use new balls.
     
    #9
  10. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    #6 is the advice that makes the most sense.
     
    #10
  11. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, that's always one of my favorites! :lol:

    Here's my take on these points that are always brought up:

    #1-3 -- True
    #4 -- False
    #5 -- Conditionally True if you have terrible form, which I can spot from a mile away
    #6 -- LOL. Seriously, we have an obligation to give these guys a bunch of crap when they say stuff like that!
     
    #11
  12. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    Imo it is far more about your form. If your form leads to a tight grip at contact,
    then imo you are more likely to get TE.
    Yes, certain strings and rackets can put you more at risk if your form is not up
    to par.
     
    #12
  13. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    My arm agrees with your answer on #4.
     
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  14. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I don't deny that bad form can wreck your arm, but I don't think it's that prevalent among advanced players. Age and genetics have a lot to do with it. If you're playing with poly and have no problems, you can count yourself among those fortunate individuals with good genetics.

    It's very tough to pick apart my form. It's almost textbook, and I don't grip tightly until contact. I've worked with the pro at my local club who was once a highly ranked tour player and has classic form. I think it's more of a matter of me taking fast swings and having thin bones and joints. I've done a lot to develop my muscles in those areas, but I don't know of an exercise that will build up bones and cartilage.

    Bottom line is I can't think of ONE instance (forum, in person, or otherwise) where I heard anyone with a history of tennis elbow say that they improved their form and can now hit with a stiff frame and poly strings. On this forum, you can easily find dozens of testimonials from people who got rid of their tennis elbow simply by changing equipment.
     
    #14
  15. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    If it were physically possible, it may have some relevance. Seeing as there are zero players ever to do it... Bad plan
     
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  16. 3fees

    3fees Hall of Fame

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    Agree lower tension-softer strings will help.
     
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  17. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    Just read any Pro Kennex thread.. lol
     
    #17
  18. mbm0912

    mbm0912 Professional

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    I may need to go lower then. I'm at around 58 lbs., where my racquet recommends 62. I'm playing with a Prince Multifilament string which should be designed to be very arm friendly. My arm is killing me today!
     
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  19. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    58? Drop 8 right off the bat, unless your racket is an OS, then drop 4.
    You have elbow problems, why use such high tensions?
     
    #19
  20. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    You should not play with a tennis elbow injury or otherwise stress it.

    Search the many threads in this forum for information on TE & Golfer's Elbow. Also search tendinosis (defective healing) and tendinitis (with inflammation).
     
    #20
  21. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    The anecdotal evidence is that stiffer string is not good for people with tennis elbow, and the most common stiffer strings are some sort of co-poly.

    There are a lot of us that play with polys and have no elbow problems. On the other hand, if you have elbow problems it really makes sense to use a more flexible string.

    The other common advice is to use a heavier more flexible graphite racket to protect your elbow.
     
    #21
  22. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Does anyone know of any neutral research on the issue?

    What characteristic of the strings is important?

    How do the different strings compare for that characteristic?
     
    #22
  23. mbm0912

    mbm0912 Professional

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    It is an OS

    58 is toward the lowest tension recommended with that racquet. It comes strung @ 62 so I dropped it 4 and went with the softer strings. So you would go 4 more with the OS? I also hit around 5 times a week.
     
    #23
  24. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I got TE earlier this year. I dropped my tension, although I continued using the same strings (gut on the mains, poly on the crosses).

    That seems to have helped. Now I am string the gut at 55 and the poly at 50. I'm pretty much cured.
     
    #24
  25. TheCheese

    TheCheese Professional

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    If you like poly, try going low tension. mid to low 30s.
     
    #25
  26. CFreeborn

    CFreeborn New User

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    I went through similar issues last year. Mine was "Golfers Elbow" rather than tennis - which was directly related to squeezing the racket handle too tight.
    Also switched to a softer racket (Babo Pure Storm) and away from poly strings to a multi mix. So far favorite is Wilson NXT Control, with Babo Addiction coming in second. That allowed me to keep the tension where I prefer (57-9), but soften up the string bed.
    -C
     
    #26
  27. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    It seems there is no good quality statistical study of this issue, which isn't surprising. The evidence is anecdotal, but doesn't seem completely wrong. Stiffer rackets and string seem more likely to irritate tendon issues. However, the fact that some people play stiff rackets and string without issue while other people with flexible rackets and gut have developed tennis elbow shows that logically poly is not the only cause of tennis elbow.

    I don't know how to properly define it, but anyone who strings knows that poly string is stiff and holds a bend, unlike gut or most synthetic guts and multis.
     
    #27
  28. Mick3391

    Mick3391 Professional

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    This year is my year of learning about injuries, seems I've had it all, calfs, golfers elbow, neck, tendon in the ankle.

    The last thing to go, and I thought I'd never play serious again, was this golfers elbow. I don't know how old you are, I'm what like 38, anyways it was so bad it hurt to dry my hair, hurt to pick up the racquet.

    Call me nuts, or perhaps it's just cooincidence, but I started HCG shots 500IU every other day, it's boosts testosterone, and I am totally pain free, I mean I played today, nothing, could run no pain in the legs, but my arm is what amazed me.

    Testosterone my understanding builds muscles back up, repairs if you will, I'm not sure, and I realize this is just anecdotal evidence, but heh, I can play full speed again:)
     
    #28
  29. colowhisper

    colowhisper Semi-Pro

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    Can you elaborate on your testosterone steroid program please? Are these actual injections and under a supervised prescription? I am 45 years old very active and athletic but I can feel my body aging and curious about every advantage possible to strengthen and have more energy.
     
    #29
  30. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Do you hit with a one hand backhand?

    Researcher D. Knudson has some interesting things to say about 1hbh technique.
     
    #30
  31. Mick3391

    Mick3391 Professional

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    Sure, it's not taking Testosterone, that alone will reduce your body to produce it naturally.

    HCG shots, 500IU every other day forces your body to produce it's own Testosterone naturally. Until last year, you could get it without a prescription, but since there is this weird diet associated with it, that is basically starving yourself, the extra Test supposed to hold onto muscle, the FDA made it so it's only legal with a prescription.

    I would look here for more information http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_chorionic_gonadotropin

    All you are doing is RESTORING your Testosterone to when you were much younger, no side effects, no complications, it's AWESOME.
     
    #31
  32. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    As long as you have enough money, you can find a quack to initiate this "therapy" and become a HCG junkie.

    How did you fink your quack?



    HCG is a banned substance in all sports.

    "Since it is established that human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) affects testosterone production and release in the human body, the use of this hormone as a performance enhancing drug has been prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency.
    - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21798680


    "Does HCG IM have side effects?
    The following side effects are associated with HCG IM:
    Common side effects of HCG IM:
    Enlargement of an Ovary Severe
    Visible Water Retention Less Severe
    Infrequent side effects of HCG IM:
    Puberty at an Earlier Age than would be expected Severe
    Depression Less Severe
    Enlarged Breasts Less Severe
    Low Energy Less Severe
    Head Pain Less Severe
    Nervous Less Severe
    Signs and Symptoms at Injection Site Less Severe
    Easily Angered or Annoyed Less Severe
    Rare side effects of HCG IM:
    Ruptured Ovarian Cyst Severe
    Acute Blood Clot in an Artery Severe
    Ovarian Enlargement Usually due to Infertility Treatment Severe
    Life Threatening Allergic Reaction Severe
    Allergic Reaction caused by a Drug Severe"
    - http://www.webmd.com/drugs/drug-11192-HCG.aspx?drugid=11192&drugname=HCG&source=0&pagenumber=6
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2012
    #32
  33. colowhisper

    colowhisper Semi-Pro

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    Yikes, I read the wiki and it looks pretty scary to me! Not the silver bullet I was looking for, too bad. Thanks for the info both of you.
     
    #33
  34. epiczeko

    epiczeko New User

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    You should add good dampener to that list. A rubber band should do the trick ;)
    It helped me.
     
    #34

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