Tennis Elbow- has anyone tried a cross fiber friction massage?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Tight Lines, Sep 19, 2013.

  1. Tight Lines

    Tight Lines Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Messages:
    725
    Location:
    Sparkill, NY
    Arrgh.... I developed tennis elbow a couple of weeks ago after playing a few sets with my son who is starting to hit really hard.

    I am trying to figure out how I got it since I don't have a one handed backhand although I do tend to slice a lot on my backhand. I think it may have come from my gripping the racket hard to try to return the had balls hit to me.

    Any way, I immediately ordered the Thera-band flexbar both red and green and am doing the red ones now to speed up my healing process.

    But while doing research on the topic on the internet, I came across an exercise called cross fiber friction massage. Basically, you rub the part of tendon being healed in a lateral direction (right angle to the tendon fibers) pretty hard.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Csb91xr0x00

    I came across this site while doing research on NMT (neuro-muscular therapy), which I think may be helpful for proper aligning of the injured tendon fibers.

    Has anyone tried it and if so, did it help?

    Harry
     
    #1
  2. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Messages:
    779
    It can help.

    It can be pretty painful.

    Don't force anything.

    If it's hurting you have to have enough awareness of your body to know whether what you're doing is a "good" kind of hurt or "bad".

    Obviously if your body is telling you that what you're doing is "bad", you need to stop.

    Area worked on might be sore and swollen the next day FYI.
     
    #2
  3. andreh

    andreh Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    1,089
    Yeah, I would not do that on my own. Go to a physical therapist if you want to try it.
     
    #3
  4. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    19,552
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Check out trigger point therapy as well. There is a spot in your upper back/shoulder area that can tighten up and pull tension all the way down your arm.
     
    #4
  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    35,707
    Always thought rubbing across the tendon/ligament is the first thing you do. It seldom cures the problem, but can alleviate the pain somewhat.
     
    #5
  6. Tight Lines

    Tight Lines Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Messages:
    725
    Location:
    Sparkill, NY
    Thanks guys for all your comments. Although I have only done it once yesterday, I feel better already.... Could be all psychological ...

    Harry
     
    #6
  7. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Messages:
    779
    Most people have the instinct to grasp and rub anything that's painful. Yes, might not cure anything, but can feel good.

    Nothing wrong with feeling good.

    So you'd think that would be a clear course of action somewhere down the line (no pun intended).

    But it always seems everyone's first advise is to ditch the poly and get a Therabar or whatever that device is called....:evil:

    No mention of maybe getting some soft tissue work done:confused: as part of the treatment.

    Then people wonder why it takes months or longer to become pain free.

    Don't ignore your instincts!
     
    #7
  8. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,337
    I agree soft tissue manipulation is under-utilized.

    I thought soft tissue fiber realignment happens pretty slowly and from the repeated pull on the said part through the soft tissue connections like fascia.

    I'd suggest look into the technique and get better if you want to continue playing. probably the best course of action for TE.
     
    #8
  9. Devil_dog

    Devil_dog Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2013
    Messages:
    645
    I never knew this had a name but that's exactly what I did for my tennis elbow. Along with the massage, I also iced my elbow for about 15-20 minutes. And to add, I also switched from a poly string setup to a softer multi string bed and that made all the difference for me. Good luck and best wishes on a speedy recovery!
     
    #9
  10. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,220
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Your tendon connects to the bone over a small area. You tore some of that tissue area near the bone or another part of the tendon away from the bone. The early healing is perhaps the most important. Many players play on it to see how it will do and lose the initial critical opportunity for optimal healing. Consider how the small damaged area is healing when your activity places large forces on the injured tendon tissues - the same forces - in the same small area - that caused the injury in the first place.

    Stop playing right away. I read that playing on a new accute TE injury can lead to defective healing in a very short time.

    Tendons require considerable time to heal - research this issue. Search the many threads here on tennis elbow especially those by CharlieFedererer with healing times.

    If your tendon heals with defects you are taking on tendinosis, a chronic condition resulting from defective tendon healing. The natural 'healing' is finished.

    The paper below from the British Medical Journal reflects a more current view of tendinitis, tendinosis and tendonapthy.



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Time to abandon the “tendinitis” myth
    Painful, overuse tendon conditions have a non-inflammatory pathology

    K M Khan, assistant professor, J L Cook, associate professor, [...], and S F Bonar, senior musculoskeletal pathologist

    Additional article information

    Tendinitis such as that of the Achilles, lateral elbow, and rotator cuff tendons is a common presentation to family practitioners and various medical specialists.1 Most currently practising general practitioners were taught, and many still believe, that patients who present with overuse tendinitis have a largely inflammatory condition and will benefit from anti-inflammatory medication. Unfortunately this dogma is deeply entrenched. Ten of 11 readily available sports medicine texts specifically recommend non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for treating painful conditions like Achilles and patellar tendinitis despite the lack of a biological rationale or clinical evidence for this approach.2,3

    Instead of adhering to the myths above, physicians should acknowledge that painful overuse tendon conditions have a non-inflammatory pathology. Light microscopy of patients operated on for tendon pain reveals collagen separation4–6—thin, frayed, and fragile tendon fibrils, separated from each other lengthwise and disrupted in cross section. There is an apparent increase in tenocytes with myofibroblastic differentiation (tendon repair cells) and classic inflammatory cells are usually absent.4 This is tendinosis and it was first described 25 years ago,6 but this fundamental of musculoskeletal medicine has not yet replaced the tendinitis myth. Tendinosis is not merely a long term corollary of short term tendinitis. Animal studies show that within two to three weeks of tendon insult tendinosis is present and inflammatory cells are absent.7

    A critical review of the role of various anti-inflammatory medications in soft tissue conditions found limited evidence of short term pain relief and no evidence of their effectiveness in providing even medium term clinical resolution of clearly diagnosed tendon disorders.2 Laboratory studies have not shown a therapeutic role for these medications. Corticosteroid injections provide mixed results in relieving the pain of tendinopathy.8,9

    If general practitioners, orthopaedic surgeons, and other members of the healthcare professions treating tendon disorders made a quantum shift from previous flawed teaching about overuse tendinitis and adopted these data there would be immediate ramifications. Nomenclature for the clinical presentation of tendon disorders would reflect the true histopathological basis underlying clinical presentation.10 The term tendinitis would rarely cross doctors' lips. Numerous authorities 2,10 recommend the term tendinopathy (for example, Achilles tendinopathy) as this acknowledges that the condition is not tendinitis. We favour this term for clinical diagnosis. Most importantly, we must acknowledge, at least till contrary data appear, that anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy does not provide significant long term benefit in tendinopathy.2,11 Nevertheless, high quality randomised controlled trials are urgently needed to examine the long term effects of these medications on tendinopathy.

    If general practitioners treating musculoskeletal conditions embraced the tendinopathy paradigm, it would provide patients with an accurate description of their condition. It would avoid inappropriate pharmacotherapy with its attendant costs and comorbidity. Furthermore, by accepting need to allow time for collagen turnover and remodelling inherent in the pathology of tendinosis, doctors would be free to provide patients with a realistic prognosis that better reflects the finding of prospective clinical studies.12 These conditions take months rather than weeks to resolve.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    More detailed paper-
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3445129/

    Thread, includes healing time information supplied by CharlieFedererer.
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=442912&highlight=tendon+injury+nuthouse
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2013
    #10

Share This Page