Tennis Elbow Linked To Technique Not Grip Size

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by rk_sports, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. rk_sports

    rk_sports Hall of Fame

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    #1
  2. vbranis

    vbranis Professional

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    I totally agree with this, improper technique is clearly what causes tennis elbow. However, it's also worth noting that using the wrong grip size might lead to improper technique.
     
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  3. Martingale

    Martingale Rookie

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    I hadn't seen this, nice find, although few players participated. The next step would be to take a number of players suffering from TE and see which grips lead to further worsening more than others....
     
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  4. goober

    goober Legend

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    Some problems with this study:

    They only went 1/4 " up and down below the recommended grip size. They should have inlcuded 1/2" or even larger variances. One could argue that 1/4" is not enough to make a difference.

    D1 college players have very well developed forearm muscles and good technique. They maybe less susceptible to changes in grip sizes.

    Grip sizes may have more of an effect on those with already poor technique and those prone to tennis elbow.

    I am not sure what to take from this study other than high level tennis players who don't get tennis elbow anyways are not likely to get it by going up or down one grip size:confused:.
     
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  5. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    I agree with goober, but I do think technique is probably the #1 cause of tennis elbow. My opinion isn't backed by anthing more than my age and experience, which aren't worth enough to get a decent latte from Starbuck's. ;)

    -Robert
     
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  6. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    I'd agree that the study only offers conclusions about well trained athletes, so applicability to the recreational player is not clear. It's not even clear that the finding is meaningful at all, as I don't see any statistical power analysis in the detailed description of the study (i.e. were there enough subjects, as mentioned above). Example of inadequate statistical power >> you flip a coin three times and get "heads" all three times. Have you proven that a flipped coin will always come up "heads"? No. We know that if you flip it ENOUGH TIMES you will reach a point where it comes up heads half the times and tails half the times. There is a way to calculate how many flips it takes to get this true result, and that's called statistical power. The authors could have done a calculation to determine how many athletes they have to test to get a true result, but didn't. A measure of statistical significance, which they performed, is helpful but not enough.
     
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  7. andreh

    andreh Professional

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    Isn't this old news? Bad technique as a main cause has been around for a long time as far as I know, at least as theory, if not emperically proven research.
     
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