tennis glasses

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by emmanuel, Jan 29, 2010.

  1. emmanuel

    emmanuel Rookie

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    #1
  2. Marshredder

    Marshredder Semi-Pro

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    You dont need tennis glasses. Dont be silly.
     
    #2
  3. OHBH

    OHBH Semi-Pro

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    ^^^^^ AGREED. your eyes will be just fine.
     
    #3
  4. Solid MD

    Solid MD Rookie

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    Have you ever been hit by a tennis ball in the eye? There's a very small chance of that happening, really.
     
    #4
  5. Mazilla2219

    Mazilla2219 Rookie

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    Go buy some racquetball glasses if you are really that worried about getting hit accidentally.
     
    #5
  6. tennis005

    tennis005 Professional

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    Usually the only time that a ball could potentially hit your eye is while at net. I suggest you keep the racket in front of you so you can quickly block anything coming your way.
     
    #6
  7. EcoRick

    EcoRick New User

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    I think you'd get hurt more from the glasses ripping your nose off. I agree with the others to move back and protect yourself if you're realy concerned about getting hit.
     
    #7
  8. jswinf

    jswinf Professional

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    I think if you'd feel safer wearing protective glasses you should do it. Serious eye injuries in tennis aren't common, but they're not impossible either. If someone wearing sports glasses gets hit hard enough that the frame damages the skin, you can assume that an impact that hard would have done more damage if the glasses hadn't absorbed most of it. The product you're considering looks reasonable and reasonably priced--I wouldn't spend 200 bucks for a pair.

    Some guys don't wear seat belts, either.
     
    #8
  9. emmanuel

    emmanuel Rookie

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    Yes I have.
    But the worst, I have seen very dangerous accidents happening to
    another people...
    So, what am I waiting to protect my only 2 eyes?
    Thanks for your recommendations.

    ASTM F803 - 03 Standard Specification for Eye Protectors For Selected Sports

    This specification covers eye protectors, designed for use by players of racket sports, women's lacrosse, field hockey, basketball, baseball, and soccer that minimize or significantly reduce injury to the eye and adnexa due to impact and penetration by racket-sport rackets and balls, women's lacrosse and field hockey sticks and balls, baseballs, soccer balls, hands, elbows, and fingers. Protective eyewear offers protection only to the eyes and does not protect other parts of the head. Protectors are divided into four types depending on their design characteristics as follows: Type I—A protector with the lens or lenses and frame frontpiece molded as one unit. Frame temples or other devices, such as straps, to affix the lens/frontpiece may be separate pieces; Type II—A protector with a single lens or lenses, either plano or prescription, mounted in a frame that was manufactured as a separate unit; Type III—A protector without a lens; and Type IV—A full or partial face shield. Materials shall be tested using optical tests such as field of view, optical quality, luminous transmittance, prismatic deviation measurements, haze, refractive power measurements, surface imperfections and internal defects, and alternate optical tests; and mechanical tests such as high velocity impact resistance, and projectile simulator test. In addition, the individual grades shall conform to the general, and performance requirements.

    This abstract is a brief summary of the referenced standard. It is informational only and not an official part of the standard; the full text of the standard itself must be referred to for its use and application. ASTM does not give any warranty express or implied or make any representation that the contents of this abstract are accurate, complete or up to date.

    1. Scope

    1.1 This specification covers eye protectors, designed for use by players of racket sports, women's lacrosse, field hockey, basketball, and baseball that minimize or significantly reduce injury to the eye and adnexa due to impact and penetration by racket-sport rackets and balls, women's lacrosse and field hockey sticks and balls, baseballs, and hands, elbows, and fingers. Protective eyewear offers protection only to the eyes and does not protect other parts of the head.

    1.2 Protectors are divided into four types depending on their design characteristics.

    1.3 This specification applies to eye protectors for use by wearers of corrective lenses and also by those players who do not require prescription eyewear.

    Note 1—Warning Polycarbonate spectacle lenses should be used if spectacles are worn under protective eyewear.

    1.4 In this standard, the use of the words "shall" or "must" indicates a mandatory requirement. The word "should" indicates a recommendation.

    1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Metric units of measurement in this specification are in accordance with the International System of Units (SI). If a value for measurement as given in this specification is followed by an equivalent value in other units, the first stated is to be regarded as the requirement. A given equivalent value may be approximate.

    1.6 The following precautionary caveat pertains only to the test methods portions, Sections 9-11, of this specification:This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2010
    #9
  10. Tina

    Tina Banned

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    I am wearing the glasses all the time. I am save!!
     
    #10
  11. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    These look fine as protection.
    I suspect even the clear ones will block 99% of ultraviolet rays.

    I wear Bolle sunglasses with shatterproof interchangable polycarbonate lenses. I like the polarized sandstone best for outdoor tennis as it provides great contrast and reduces glare without being too dark. You may want to look into these if you play a lot outside where glare is a problem: http://www.opticsplanet.net/bolle-actionsport-vigilante.html
    You can even get vision correction: http://www.opticsplanet.net/bolle-action-sport-vigilante-parole-rx-sos-adapter-cr-39-clear-lens.html
     
    #11
  12. Tennis_Monk

    Tennis_Monk Hall of Fame

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    Save the $$$$ or give them as donation to your favorite charity (redcross, Unicef, etc). No real use with those so called tennis glasses.

    Last time i was at Miami Open, some stores were selling them and a friend of mine bought it. I tried it and as far as i am concerned, it is BS!
     
    #12
  13. emmanuel

    emmanuel Rookie

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    Thanks a lot Charliefedererer for your useful and precise answer.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2010
    #13
  14. PBODY99

    PBODY99 Hall of Fame

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    I wear Bolle's, I don't use the CompVision lens that the company pushes for tennis, but they have save me from injury on more than one occasion. If you don't need the RX adapter, go to any Bike store and shop for frames. They tend to meet the standard and you have a wider selection of both fit and price points.
     
    #14

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