Tennis training aids

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by schang70, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. schang70

    schang70 New User

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    Does anybody have any experience with using tennis training aids to teach juniors or adults? I see that there is the serve doctor to teach beginner's the correct location of the ball during the serve. There is also a tool to teach topspin and another tool to teach the whip like motion of the modern forehand. These tools seem very interesting just wondering if anybody has used them. My daughter is 7 and some of these techniques are very difficult to teach.
     
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  2. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

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    dont buy any of that mess. Spend the money with a good coach.
     
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  3. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    there are very few tennis "training aids" worth anything. Let me know if you find any :)

    best one I know of......ball machine.
     
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  4. schang70

    schang70 New User

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    I live up north, so I am spending a ton on indoor court fees during the Winter. She's in a group lesson, but I just can't afford privates for now. She's having a problem with her serve motion. I was going to buy the serve doctor so she can get used to the correct mechanics of the serve motion without having to worry about the ball toss. It's only 30 bucks so if it doesn't work, I can use it to knock down cobwebs around the house:)
     
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  5. lstewart

    lstewart Rookie

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    I'm old school, but we used to teach the classic service motion at camps I worked at using a continious motion loop, that would not require tossing a ball, or being on the court. Basically you are at the starting point of the serve, go through the motion, and return to the ready position. You can then keep going, and make it a constant motion swing. Of course, that was using the classic loop figure 8 motion. If you are teaching the newer Roddick type "throw the ball up and hit it" motion, might not work. Either way, you could work on your service motion anywhere you have enough room to swing a racket without breaking anything.
     
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  6. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I suspect they are all a waste of money
     
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  7. Chemist

    Chemist Rookie

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    I started recently to watch many clips of top pros in slow motion on Youtube. These pros, men or women, are the best teachers (or teaching reference) for techniques. You can tape your kids and let kids compare the video. It's truly amazing! One local coach charges $75 an hr doing the same thing. I should have done this 4-5 years ago. It's very hard to break a bad habit for a 16 yr old. We still take privates from a former ATP pro, who can hit balls to almost anywhere from everywhere - nice to confirm that he teaches what most touring pros do today.:)
     
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  8. gplracer

    gplracer Professional

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    Cones, jump ropes and rubber bands for strengthening.
     
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  9. Chemist

    Chemist Rookie

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    And run sprints, suicides, 400M, miles for endurance
     
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  10. schang70

    schang70 New User

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    I've done this too. I posted a video of my daughter couple months ago, and the feedback I got was her technique was all wrong. I compared hers to the pros and saw the difference right away. Now she has the elbow leading the racket back, her left hand holding racket during take back, and she finishes the swing with the racket pointing behind her. She's still got a long way to go, but I'm glad I changed her forehand motion. She's the only one with the modern forehand technique in her group class.
     
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  11. schang70

    schang70 New User

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    Yep, I just bought a jump rope and cones. Got her started with plyometrics yesterday. I think this will improve her overall coordination and quickness. She's too young but as she gets older, I'll probably have her run miles and weight training. But what can I say, I am a sucker for gadgets. I was always impressed with those Ginsu knife commercials, but never fell for the Flowbee if anyone remember that one from the 80's.
     
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  12. Soianka

    Soianka Hall of Fame

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    LOL. I remember the Flowbee. It always looked very dangerous to me and produced not a terribly stylish haircut.
     
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  13. Chemist

    Chemist Rookie

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    Another testimony that parents can help their kids in tennis training.:)
     
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  14. NetNinja68

    NetNinja68 Rookie

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    The biggest training tool I discovered was an internal revelation that although I was a high level athlete in my youth I do not have the experience or knowledge base to coach my daughter to be a great tennis player. What I have done is focus on what I know and that's speed, flexibility and strength development and have left the tennis technique to the tennis professionals. Training equipment is great if you know how to teach with it and for that you must be an athlete your self. That said, you don't need much to enhance strength and movement.
     
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  15. frank19991999

    frank19991999 New User

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    Strongly suggest racket bracket for volleys and atp belt for athletic stance.
     
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