Tennisguy777's One-handed backhand

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Tennisguy777, Dec 22, 2008.

  1. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    This thread is to discuss my one handed backhand, which I've had problems with for about 9 years now - ever since I started playing. I decided last week to fix it once and for all so I joined an indoor club and will practice it at least 3 times a week for 2hrs. so far I have hit with the ball machine for 3 days. A video of the progress is below.

    Give me pointers and tips. I think I see improvements already. The video is good except for I placed camera on the ball machine and camera was sliding back so you really can't tell how deep I am hitting them in, but most I'd say of those that cleared the net, 8/10 - 9/10 are in. I had about 2 or 3 home runs but the rest of those that were out were by less than 6 inches. I was trying to work on consistency. The video is 10.5 minutes.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rA8Yc1_zFs watch it full screen in HQ
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2008
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  2. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    You stuck the camera on top of the ball machine? You are extremely tiny so it's really hard to see you. Especially with the top of the net at waist level. It would be helpful if you had zoomed in, or moved the camera near the net at the sidelines so we could see you much larger. Tripod would be useful (I tell this to everyone, but most people seem to find carrying a tripod a hassle).

    I would say, from what I could see, that you have a decent looking follow-through, though the ball trajectory didn't seem all that good. That is, it lacks much pace. I can't quite tell how much forward motion you are making.

    I would also say you are a little too sideways to the shot. You need to rotate more. I should be able to see your back when you start off.

    The butt of the racquet when you take the racquet back behind you should point to right wall (you're a lefty). This means your power is more from your arm and doesn't involve enough of your torso (core).

    It's hard to tell how you are taking back the racquet, but the racquet head may also need to start off higher (shoulder height) as you take it back. It seems like you could get a little more height on your shots (I have that issue too). It's a little too close to the net. You might need to step in more, too, though I can't tell where the ball is landing relative to you.

    Another camera position you could try (need a tripod for this) is along the baseline right of you (from your viewpoint) so we can see a side-on view of your backhand.
     
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  3. jasoncho92

    jasoncho92 Professional

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    Its not HD...
     
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  4. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Check the first three images to see how Fed takes the racquet behind him and also how high his racquet is up initially. And how his back is turned to you when his racquet is behind him.
     
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  5. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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  6. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    The balls are coming in at 65 mph and I was hitting them back pretty hard. I guess the camera plays tricks. I don't really have anything to put camera on. I'll figure something out for Wednesday!
     
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  7. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Well it was recorded at 1024 x 768 HD and was converted to FLV. might have lost a little quality but you can still watch it in HQ.
     
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  8. migjam

    migjam Professional

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    From what I see you are turning your torso enough and getting your shoulder into the shot. It looks to me (from what little I can see) like you are just bending your arm. Also, like the other post already said, don't start off turned. Square your shoulders off then turn and step.

    Try getting a cheap tripod and setting up the camera from a close side view
     
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  9. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    Heh, well this is a problem when one watches pro tennis all the time. Shots look slow on camera!
     
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  10. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    So hard that I got a blister between my ring and index finger on the tip of my palm I think it was the tourna grip I knew I should have left the klippermate grip on. I am contemplating waking up at 5:30 and going tomorrow so I can take another video!
     
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  11. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    I pulled up your other video, which I recall you had posted once:

    Other video

    It's much easier to see what's going on. Again, pay attention to what your shoulders are doing as you hit the backhand. It isn't moving much. This means you arm does more work. In this video, I can see you do get your racquet behind you, but you might want to raise it higher to get more of a loop behind you.

    Also, you should use your right hand to help take back the racquet on your backhand (you can look at Fed do that too). This should also help on shoulder rotation.
     
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  12. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    I see what you mean about turning and squaring the shoulder I had tried that but could never get the timing down. But I see how you can get extra power it's like recoiling.
     
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  13. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    #13
  14. jasoncho92

    jasoncho92 Professional

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    HD is 1280x720
     
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  15. split-step

    split-step Professional

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    I see a lack of purpose in your hitting. Where you going cross court, up the line, to the middle??

    Also your seemingly preferred contact point is too low. You wait for the ball to drop and are contacting the ball well below net height.
    A lot of the netted backhands you hit were because you let the ball drop too low and couldn't get your racquethead sufficiently below the ball to bring it over the net.
    You are making things harder for yourself this way.

    For a ball with such net clearance (as the balls you are being fed are), you want to position yourself to take that ball at the apex of the bounce.
    Get your body weight moving forward as you do this.

    Practise this with set targets cross court and up the line.

    Also when practising one groundstroke wing, after hitting the ball, return to your neutral position, facing the court with your neutral grip, then change grip and get into position after the next ball is fed and so on and so forth.

    You should have a better backhand after 9 years.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2008
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  16. chico9166

    chico9166 Guest

    Tennisguy,

    Kudos to you for working on your game in this holiday season, while the rest of us are commited to eating and watching football.

    While I commend your efforts, the way you're using the ball machine illustrates my principle objection to ball machine use by many.

    Specifically, that you're already turned, so you are not learning how to set the unit turn as part of the process.

    And the fact your already in the line of the ball, so you are not developing basic alignment (laterally speaking) skills.

    Next time you work out, position yourself so you have to actually move a couple steps to align to the ball. Always, lead, or step out with your right foot so your right hip opens up. This will teach you to trigger the unit turn with your feet. Recover, and repeat the process.

    Post a video using this basic footwork pattern. Then we'll see where were at. Good luck.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2008
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  17. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    I agree with chico that you should be in the ready position after your shots, and not remain turned just because you know that the ball's coming to your backhand side. You need to split step even if you know where the balls coming. If you don't ingrain these habits in practice, just how will you remember to do them in a match?

    I think your biggest problem is that you are preparing too late. You should already have your racquet taken back all the way by the time the ball bounces. Your preparation seems very low as well. Your racquet should be pointing towards the sky with your hitting hand at chest to ear height. One thing that I really like about your backhand is that your take back is very simple. You don't make any big loop during the back swing, which will help your timing dramatically as you learn this stroke. Just focus on taking the racquet back a little higher with your racquet pointing to the sky.

    Also, your contact point is way too low. You're consistently taking the ball at knee height, which is robbing you of a lot of power. The ideal contact point for a one hander is waist height. Even if you get a low, biting slice, you should still use your legs to make contact at waist height by bending your knees.

    I can't really tell from this camera angle, but you look like you're also making contact too close to your body. I think that you're hitting your backhand with a slightly bent arm, which is another recipe for disaster for a one handed backhand. Make sure that your arm is straight at contact and take the ball out in front of your body.

    Again, it's hard to tell from this camera angle, but it looked to me like you aren't making good use of the non dominant arm during the follow through. Make sure that you extend this arm back during your forward swing to help with balance and to insure that you aren't opening up too much towards the net. Remember that the maximum amount of shoulder rotation towards the net should be with your shoulders at a 45 degree angle to the net.

    So, to summarize:

    Preparation:

    1. Focus on preparing early. Have the racquet taken back all the way by the time the ball bounces.

    2. Use a simple smile patterned take back with your hitting hand at chest to ear height.

    Hitting Zone:

    1. Always make contact at waist height, whenever possible. Use your legs to achieve this on low balls.

    2. Make sure that your arm is straight at contact.

    3. Take the ball out in front of your body.

    Ending:

    1. Use the non dominant arm to stay on balance and keep you from opening up too much.

    2. Make sure that you aren't rotating your shoulders more than a 45 degree angle to the net.

    Hope this helps,

    Matt
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
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  18. smoothtennis

    smoothtennis Hall of Fame

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    You are WAY late. That is the bad and good news. It is quite easy to fix.

    Notice just one thing to start. Look at your vid, and tell me where your racket and shoulders are when the ball is hitting the court on your side.

    Now - you want to follow Gilad's stroke? Look back at his vid, and see where his racket and shoulders are when the ball hits the court. You will have a light bulb moment I think.
     
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  19. smoothtennis

    smoothtennis Hall of Fame

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    Djokovicfan4life - Excellent advice once again. This is THE number one thing to fix, and the rest will be so much more manageble.

    Think about it this way. No matter what technical changes you make to your stroke at this time, they will all be on a very short schedule. In other words, since you are already very rushed due to being very late in prep, no matter what you do, it can't take full effect because there is already not enough time to do what you are already doing.

    Shoulder turn when you see the balls direction, racket back and ready to come foreward when the ball bounces. That should be your basic timing.

    And what is this? HIT-BOUNCE-HIT. Work your mechanics around this cadence.
     
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  20. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Yes you are correct it was recorded at 1280 x 720 and the 10 min raw file was 600 MB when converted to flv it became like 90 MB and it took several tries to upload. The 1024 x 768 is my screen resolution sorry for confusion.
     
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  21. Azzurri

    Azzurri Legend

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    At least you are giving a conetrated effort. But like everyone has said, you need to work on your BH (we all do:)). You need to have some type of consistency on your BH when you use a machine. Work on 10 down the line, 10 cross-court and so on. Split-step. Its really bad to stand there side ways. You are catching the ball way too low and the machine is feeding oddly arched balls. No way that is 65 mph. The balls are coming in (to you) like a rainbow. You look like you have nice follow through, but more discipline in your practice is a must. Good luck, some good advice is on here. Maybe write down 2 tips and pratice them at a time. Try not to work on 5 things at once. 1st thing is don't stand sideways and fix that ball path (it comes in too high of an angle). good luck!:)
     
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  22. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    I uploaded two more backhand videos just now and they are not up yet someone can go look at them and post link they are under my channel on youtube! These videos show my backhand from the side and a lot closer! One is Low quality and the other one is in HD converted to HQ for jasoncho92 :) Thanks.
     
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  23. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Here is the link to the low quality one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXXa9m8Iar0

    Yes Azzurri they are are getting launched at 65 mph todays were 70 mph, now after they bounce how fast they are coming is a different story!
     
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  24. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Dude, I wasn't going to say anything about the ball speed, but that machine is NOT feeding you 65 MPH balls. Those are practically moon balls as for as I'm concerned. 65-70 MPH is enough to hit a winner on the ATP tour if it's well placed enough, are you saying that those balls could get by an ATP player?
     
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  25. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    I set them to bounce high but they are being fed at 65 mph!
     
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  26. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    I'm looking at your new video. Here is a link:

    Tennisguy777 new video

    It is much closer and easier to see.

    I might suggest aiming the ball machine further to your right. The most common shot for backhands is a crosscourt shot, and you're having to stand to the left and hitting up the middle shots. It would make sense (I think) to aim it to the far right corner (from your perspective) so you can practice crosscourt backhands.

    Furthermore, by moving it more to your right, you can practice a little footwork to get yourself back in the middle, and head out right again.

    Also, you're a tall guy. People have already pointed out that you let the ball drop a little too much. You should be hitting at about waist level, but you let it drop. Presumably, the ball machine is feeding you the same ball, so you should be hitting the ball at the same spot with the same preparation each time.

    This may be a consequence of hitting against the wall which tends to reflect the ball down some. I paused your video, and the racquet is around knee-height.

    Since the ball machine is feeding more or less the same ball, you should be setting your feet at more or less the same position behind the baseline. However, I see some variety in where you stand back behind the baseline. Indeed, there are many shots that you let the ball drop way down.

    For now, you may need to overcompensate by hitting the ball much higher than you feel comfortable, say, around chest height. Your natural inclination will probably wait until the ball drop to waist height, which should be about right.

    The idea is to position yourself so that you hit as much the same height ball as you can get set for.

    I like the follow-through, mostly. It's up high and straight arm. I think you could have your racquet pointed a little more up when you take it back (it looks pointed down) to add a little more loop to the shot, but I'd say the two things I'd point to are, first, move the ball machine so it hits more crosscourt and so you hit crosscourt in reply, and second, try to find the position on the court where you are hitting the ball more at chest height (that will be a little too high, but it appears you wait a fraction longer to hit the ball anyway, so you're likely to hit it waist height).

    By hitting it higher, this should allow your arm to extend out forward more too which should hopefully improve the pace of the shot.

    The camera should have probably been moved a little more to the right (from the vantage point of the camera) so you would be a little more centered although it's much improved from before. If you do aim the ball machine more crosscourt, then you will need to adjust the camera that direction more. Do a trial run (if you can play back video) to see if it's pointed correctly before taking a full 10 minute video.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
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  27. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Bear in mind that setting the machine to feed with a lot of topspin brings the speed down by a lot.
     
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  28. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    Another thing you can do is to step closer to the baseline than you are standing now. If you move the machine to go a little more crosscourt (you don't need a severe angle, just aim somewhere more in the right half of the court, say about halfway between the center line and the right sideline), practice a few shots and see where your feet are when you hit the ball.

    Then, move in at least one more step further than that into the ball so you can meet it earlier. See how that feels.
     
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  29. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    It is your backswing and how you take the racquet back that is the first thing that needs to be solved.

    The ball machine thing is not a big deal because one of the good things about a ball machine is you can isolate things to work on grooving your stroke or working on "muscle memory" in your stroke.

    So the advice about moving so you can work on lining up properly should be taken with a grain of salt and practiced at appropriate times. Such as when you want to work on all aspects together; movement, hitting, recovering.

    In fact, in the next month, I would like you to isolate just the takeback of your racquet without the step-out or trying to align yourself to the ball. Just do what your doing for now and work on taking back the racquet properly.

    HOW TO TAKE THE RACQUET BACK ON A ONEHANDED BACKHAND
    Perhaps the biggest killer to a onehanded backhand is the cricular takeback that is performed mainly by the arm. Not many players have the talent to master this kind of takeback. Many players with this circular takeback (racquet hand goes up, back, down, and forward) end up hitting late on way too many balls. They also do not develop a good unit turn because the arm is taking back the racquet and not their shoulders. And finally, because emphasis is placed on the arm doing all the work to bring the racquet into position, you end up lowering your racquet from your arm rather than your legs.

    The key to relearning your backswing, is to understand that it is the shoulder turn that takes back the racquet with the hitting hand moving in a "smile" pattern as it takes the racquet back a bit further.

    The hitting hand simply moves up along the smile curve and then comes back when it is read to lower the racquet and bring it forward.

    Watch Blakes hitting hand pattern. Watch how simply it is. Watch how it is his shoulder turn that mainly brings the racquet back and the rest is all forward swing utilizing his legs.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTyyITw-fyo

    There is not much movement with the hitting hand!! It is a very simple pattern. The hitting hand goes slightly back and up, and then comes back down an forward. It is sort of a rokciing motion or pattern.

    Now take a look at yours. There is much more going on in your backswing than what a pro does.

    Also watch how Blakes butt lowers before he rises. This helps to bring your racquet down below the ball. Blake uses his leg muscles to lower the racquet. Plus, because the hitting hand has not really moved from the ready position when he makes his unit turn, the racquet is technically low to begin with.

    This is what you need to fix and work on. It is your backswing and the hand pattern that you are making that is a huge culprit in developing consistency with your backhand.

    Watch some more...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49swrZyIn-4

    Currently you have more of a Richard Gasquet backsiwng minus the shoulder turn.

    Look at this video and watch how far the hand has to travel in order to get the racquet into position. Not many people in this world can do what Gasquet is able to do.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsdv5-eC3PY&feature=related
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
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  30. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Your stroke is reasonable as it is. True, there are some differences between your stroke and the "optimum" stroke (whatever that is). And some of the replies you are getting note these differences.

    However, be aware that there are folks with either identical, similar or even worse 1HBH strokes than what you have, that could beat every one of the folks who are giving you advice, including myself.

    I mention this not to discourage you from trying to optimize your form, but to keep you aware that much of what makes a shot effective is not stroke mechanics. One example: your overall demeanor in the videos is a bit low energy. If your footwork in matchplay is the same, I would not be suprised if your results under the pressure of matchplay would be less than what you seek. This could be improved dramtically without altering your stroke, per se' at all.
     
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  31. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    This is a false assumption. People that have studied the onehanded backhand can offer valuable advice whether they hit a twohanded backhand or have a backhand that is equal to the OPs.

    And what do you mean by optimal? Tennis is a precise game and the OP is looking for help to improve his backhand. He is not looking to stay the same as you are implying. The backswing is his issue along with a lack of shoulder rotation concerning the stroke itself.

    How do you know this?

    Well I am glad you said that footwork is important, however, we arent concentrating on this. A player can still have timing issues even with good footwork because the stroke pattern is inefficient and therefore ineffective. If I can improve a players technique which allows him to hit more balls on time and to simply his stroke so he can hit more balls effectively, then stroke mechanics DO play a major role in his ability to hit the ball well.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
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  32. sonicboi21

    sonicboi21 Banned

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    your ohbh is horrible
    your take back isnt high enough
    your follow through isnt long enough
    your not hitting through your contact point
    shots have no pace
    bad footwork.
    for the take back, lift the racket so the tip of the head is a litle above your head.
     
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  33. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    1- What's false? That his stroke is reasonable? I acknowledged his stroke was not optimal. So you're saying his stroke is terrible? I respectfully disagree.

    2- I never said his stroke was above critique, in fact I described such critiques as "true".

    3- I know that there are successful Pros who if their strokes could be seen in slo mo with their identity and all other information blacked out, would elicit "advice" on this Forum from folks who would point out the differences between what they saw and their opinion of what optimal strokes should look like.

    4- I agree that the OP did not solicit advice on anything other than his stroke. My post was to remind him that although he was getting some good advice on his stroke, that he had bigger problems than stroke mechanics, since his stroke was reasonable, not perfect, not above criticism, reasonable.

    5- Lastly, a true fact that is often overlooked in these advice threads, is that monkeying around with basic stroke mechanics (especially of a stroke one has had for nine years), is not without it's own risk. Many, many folks have lost a stroke they "liked" in searching for a stroke they "loved", ending up with a stroke they hated.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
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  34. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    No, you are providing false information.

    Here is what the poster wrote:
    This thread is to discuss my one handed backhand, which I've had problems with for about 9 years now - ever since I started playing.

    You are telling me that his stroke is "Reasonable" when he has struggled with it for 9 years? Are you kidding? He has a backswing issue that is definetly going to cause his baskhand stroke to remain mediocre unless he addresses it. It is something he has learned and engrained without investigating a more efficient and effective way to hit a onehander. We are not looking for perfection, we are looking for areas in his stroke that have the potential to keep him frustrated with his backhand.

    For you to say it is reasonable only tells me you have no idea what you are talking about. None.

    Huh? What in the world are you gassing about? Pros? Blacked out? We are here to help a player improve his stroke. You failed to provide information that could help him do so because you dont know what to look for. Then you jump on this "pro" thing which was ridiculous. If this player is hitting 50 balls late and I can provide him with information regarding his back swing to reduce that number to 20, then technique IS important. It is ridiculous to think otherwise. It is plain ol ignorance.

    How can you tell what is reasonable when you couldnt figure out his backswing issue? If you dont know what to look for how can you tell?

    This is just utterly dumb. It really is. If a player has been struggling with their stroke for NINE years, dont you think it is resonable to offer him some advice to improve his mechanics? I mean we are not talking about an overhaul here. WE certainly are talking about some adjustments to improve his skill.

    And many many folks improved their stroke because they got good instructional feedback to help them improve. These same people were stuck listening to people like you that have no clue how to teach, analyze a stroke, nor give good advice.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
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  35. Azzurri

    Azzurri Legend

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    agreed. looks like the spin ang ball trajectory is having an effect on speed. a 65 mph shot is relatively fast for the general player.

    OP: try to flatten out the trajectory..that will give you some pace.
     
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  36. Azzurri

    Azzurri Legend

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    gotta go with BB on this. the kid has some issues and he has a lot to work on. we all do.:) but his stroke is not reasonable...unless reasonable is poor?
     
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  37. gastro54

    gastro54 Rookie

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    you should return to the ready position and split step in between shots to simulate how you'd actually be hitting the ball in play

    EDIT: I see several other people have suggested this too
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
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  38. BullDogTennis

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    you are tiny, but i think it would help a ton more if you shot one to your forehand, then one to your backhand. that will force you to MOVE. your feet are at a stand still. and its going to the SAME place. if you dont want to run back and forth, set it to shoot at differnt anglels to your backhand. although you may be good at your backhand with the ball RIGHT in the same place everytime, its not gonna be there that often during a real match.
     
    #38
  39. limitup

    limitup Professional

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    Not that it really matters but those balls aren't being fed at 65-70mph. I have a ball machine and use it almost every day. I also do extensive video of my own hitting. Your balls are being fed at about 40-45 mph at the absolute most. If your machine says 65-70 you may want to get it fixed (if you care that the speed number is accurate)
     
    #39
  40. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Bill- A couple of things: perhaps my use of the word "reasonable" (beginning to sound like a broken record here, I apologize) is giving the impression that I feel that the OP would be wasting his time to take your advice. That would be false on the face of it. I have variously described the advice on this thread (much of it yours) as "true" and "good advice".

    There goes your incorrect assumption that I somehow can't understand how to improve his stroke. I was savvy enough to figure out your advice was good. No sense in posting advice already given...

    As to not providing the OP with helpful advice myself, you are contradicting yourself since initially you agreed that my example of his energy level and footwork was correct.

    I really didn't post initially to take away from the advice the OP got (although based on the trend in tone of your responses, it seems like I gave that impression), rather it was to add to it by pointing out a completely unsolicited but true (by your commentary) corollary to the specific advice he sought.

    This mini-thread is taking too much away from the OP's interest so I will consider this part dead.

    Have a nice day.
     
    #40
  41. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I agree. The trouble with the ball machine is you end up grooving your timing to a certain ball speed, spin and bounce. Then in real play you never get the same ball twice.

    The ball machine is great for conditioning, grooving, working on isolating technical things, and improving your ability to move, hit, and recover. Speaking only for me, but when I hit on a ball machine and then try to play tennis against an opponent, my timing is all whacked.
     
    #41
  42. limitup

    limitup Professional

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    Actually if you get a good high-end ball machine and use a combination of different types of balls (normal and pressureless, some old and some new, etc.) you can get a pretty decent simulation of a real rally. If you get a really high end ball machine you can definitely do it as they allow you to setup programs that put 30+ balls wherever you want on the court, all with different speed and spin. There are at least 2 in the 7-8k range that do this.

    But yeah, what you said does apply to most people who don't use a ball machine correctly.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
    #42
  43. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Thanks I appreciate it! I am not that low energy in match play. I actually play a lot better than I practice! Also I think I was tired cause I took about 4 takes almost 30 mins of straight backhands before I got that good video. Cause the first 2 vids weren't zoomed in and the third I thought I hit record but guess not! I understand what you mean by I am not turning my shoulders I see what you guys mean by that. I am instead just turning sideways and swinging!
     
    #43
  44. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    This is the beast!

    [​IMG]
     
    #44
  45. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    So it's all agreed that the footwork is ok, cause I had problems with that for the longest time?
     
    #45
  46. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    I think it's more accurate to say you should focus on shoulder rotation to initiate your backhand (and knee bend to get you down), and worry about any other issues until that is in better shape.
     
    #46
  47. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Do you then think I should go with the Tommy Haas like backhand, where on the take back the racquet face is pointing straight up before he drops it and swings through as opposed to what I do which is have the racquet parallel to ground and take it to the side and then swing through. Would it be better for me to do this?
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
    #47
  48. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    I think James Blake comes closest to the way you hit it now. Do you agree? That would seem like the better model since it's nice and simple.

    Also, the main thing to worry about is shoulder rotation to initiate the backhand. It looks like Bungalo Bill (assuming you are following his advice) would like you to focus on shoulder turn and minimizing how much arm movement you use until you hit the ball. If you look at the Blake video, concentrate on his torso and shoulders, then see what his hands are doing as he is moving his torso. They don't move that much because the shoulder rotation has done a lot of the work.

    I would imagine getting this movement down is more important than worrying about the entire arm movement, at least, as a start.

    But perhaps Bill could elaborate further.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
    #48
  49. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    There's always room for improvement when it comes to footwork, and yours definitely leaves a lot to be desired. I suspect that Bill will address this issue next, as he's certainly the most qualified person to teach footwork on this board.
     
    #49
  50. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, I was considering the normal folks that dont have 3,000 to 15,000 dollars to spend. :)

    The programmable ball machines can add a more realistic practice session for players. I am talking about the normal ball machine you mainly see.
     
    #50

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