Tennisguy777's One-handed backhand

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Tennisguy777, Dec 22, 2008.

  1. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Sounds good. I wouldnt make this real technical. We would get into an endless debate about subject that is often "tweeked" by different views.

    Full Eastern is a good grip. Just make sure you move and position yourself well so you take the majority of the balls in your grips strike zone. The adjustment should come from your movement and positioning. However, I also realize there are limitations to that suggestion as well.
     
  2. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    FAIL! FAIL! FAIL!
     
  3. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Did you just "FAIL" your own post, TennisGuy? I guess that idea wasn't so hot, huh?
     
  4. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Well I hit today and 1 handed backhand wasn't all that great. But I did seriously attempt a two-hander for first time. 1st video is forehands and 1 handed backhands and second video is two-handed backhand. Althoguh if I did get serious with two hander I'll need to sell my Aerogel 200s because they are too small I'll probably go back to 98 sq. in. After that I practiced just hitting forehands with my right hand I was actually surprised how good my right hand was albeit it's a lot weaker than my left and wrist is very weak it wasn't bad.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2wFfJiQNqM
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2008
  5. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    There was no improvement with your backswing on the onehander. I dont think you are understanding it. Your hitting hand travels very far before it starts to come down and then forward. On a ball machine, you will be able to time the ball. However, in a match it will be a liability.

    Your forehand is also off. Your non-dominant arm is of no use. It just lies there by your side and does nothing except help you get off balance and pull away from the shot, not good. Review the tips and advice from SystemicAnamoly, myself, and others on how the non-dominant arm works in the forehand stroke.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2008
  6. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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  7. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    The two-hander is a different stroke. It isn't a one-hander with the second hand put on.

    How did it feel hitting the two-hander? Any better control? Of course, it's day one of hitting with it, so to expect miracles would be premature.

    It sounds like you could benefit with some direct coaching. That would probably resolve some of your problems more quickly. I sense you're getting kinda frustrated.

    EDIT: I feel we're closing in on the day that you can do remote coaching. The cam would stream video over the internet. The coach could sit in the comfort of his home (possibly with his/her own cam). You could talk over the phone or Skype. You'd get some of the benefits of coaching and yet not have to live close to the person.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2008
  8. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    This is true.

    Good stuff.
     
  9. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    I should add more. Because the two-hander is a different stroke, you'll need some time to master it. The question that's hard to answer is whether the two-hander is a better fit for you or the one-hander.

    This is generally why people recommend staying with your old stroke. You've hit with it so long, you have some sense of how to hit it. At least, more so than the other stroke. Recently, Mansewerz was debating whether to go to a one-hander, and ended up sticking with his two-hander. I don't know what went into his decision-making, but the thread is pretty recent, so you can take a look at that.

    I'm not saying the switch doesn't make sense, just that there's work to do, if you make the change.
     
  10. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Yes.

    Yes, all strokes require time spent mastering it. A twohander may be easier to learn for some and not others. Some may spend years trying to improve their onehander without considering that it may be a vision problem.
     
  11. Farz77

    Farz77 Rookie

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    One thing many people forget to do is to gradually supinate your forearm. As you practice this, you will get a hang of when and how much you supinate it.
     
  12. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    on the two hander my right wrist tends to unlock when holding, swinging racquet or on contact so I am trying different ways to strengthen it. I can definitely tell I don't have the strength to grip onto racquet as I do with left hand. Also the two hander was ok I mean I could tell the right hand had very little control to almost no control. Also it was difficult to hit with such a small face not much room for error I'd probably need an extended length stick. Yes with the two hander I think foot work becomes more critical as in I have to be closer to ball than I'd have to be for a 1 hander. Well I'll try this little experiment and see how far it goes. Today I also started using two machines that work out the biceps and triceps since I need to strengthen my arms so worst case scenario I'll have stronger arms which won't hurt whether I go with 1 or 2 hands.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2008
  13. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    I do have a vision problem I wear -7.0 contacts on left eye and - 6.5 on right eye. I also have difficulty with ground strokes when it is dark and cloudy seems as if not enough light gets to my eyes. I always play bad and have horrible depth perception when it is cloudy outside. I wear contacts and guess what my left eye is weaker than my right eye! The left eye is the eye I use for the one hander as I am lefty and I step into the shot with my left foot. you could be onto something.

    Also I find it a little dark at the indoor courts I have trouble with vollies there and I can't tell how much I am over-hitting by whether it is 1 inch or 6 inches it all looks the same even from while at net. I thought it was the court color schemes as I am used to green and red. You might be onto something here.
     
  14. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    I heard my name, so i'm gonna chime in :D


    It seems like you can hit the one hander without too much trouble, but like most people, there are issues with it.

    IMO, don't change your backhand unless you feel it is really unnatural and its holding you back.

    I was going to, but i'm a high school player that doesn't have time, and my 2 hander has become better.

    On another note, I realized that my serve was a bigger problem than my backhand. I typically hit kick serves or some sort of spin serve on 1st and 2nd, and unfortunately, it typically lands short, doesn't have much pace, and doesn't kick that much either. Sometimes I can get a good deep one off.

    I decided to hit some flat serves to mix it up. The ball flew through the air, and it was more lethal. It turns out that my flat serve had some spin on it, so it wasn't necessarily all that flat either. I heard most pro's flat serves actually have spin on them.

    The key is to prioritize. I realized that my backhand wasn't the big issue with my developing all court/ S&V game, it was the serve. Then I realized that my kick serve was weak, and I'm gonna now reserve that for second serves and as a change up until it gets better.

    (Also, when I say "I realized", it wasn't just me realizing, it was the help of others :D. The board helped me with the backhand issue, and my cousin helped with the serve issue).
     
  15. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Man, if anything, your backswing got longer and loopier in that video. I'm really not sure what it is that you're misunderstanding here. The hitting hand should trace a simple smile pattern on the backswing, I really can't figure out how to explain it any better. As Bill has already said, use your shoulders to take the racquet back, don't focus on the arm.

    P.S. Slightly OT Bill, but my brother seems to use a loopy takeback for his one hander and his timing is spot on most of the time. He even returns serve fairly well if you can believe that. I'd tell him to switch to a simpler take back, but what's the point if this technique is already engrained and it's not hurting his backhand at all?
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2008
  16. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Someone please visually explain the smile thing cause I don't get it. Can you draw it or something. I am seriously having nightmares about smiley faces now! My little brother was wearing a big smiley face on his shirt today and it freaked me out when I saw that first thing in the morning.

    1.So foot work is ok, salvageable?
    2.take back is ok except for no smiley face / smiley pattern?
    3. I need to eliminate loop?
    4.? any other problems
    5.? any other problems

    I talked to one of the coaches and he said lessons range $50 - $70 per hour ouch.
    I did practice my right hand by hitting forehands with it today and it went ok for the second day of that. I doubt I can do a two hander just too much movement and timing issues it is very difficult.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  17. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    As I hit my 40's, my tennis court light vision and tennis became a bad mix. I noticed a huge drop in ball judgement with a "shadowy" ball to hit. The issues really becomes a problem because for some unknown reason it affects my slice more than any other stroke. It is something we need to live with I guess. :)

    Now, I play in the Boise State bubble and the lighting is not that great. I have trouble picking up volleys now, especially if the ball coming towards me was hit hard.

    Your left eye will be used for DEPTH perception which, if it is not tracking the ball properly, it can cause you to swing too early or too late depending on how it perceives the ball. Eye strengthening exercises should be a must for you. Talk to your vision therapist as well.

    Might be!
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  18. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    I really think that you can develop a good one hander if you solve your take back issues. And since you've grown accustomed to it for the past 9 years, why change your backhand when you have all the essential tools to improving your one hander right here in this thread?
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  19. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    For now, your footwork will do. It is not anything to write home about, but I would rather see you work on your takeback of the racquet first, then we can bring the footwork in to support it. Normally I like to work the other way around, but in this case, I think you are going to have trouble breaking this habit of taking a long hitting hand path to hit the ball. Further, the hitting hand path you have works in conjunction with your timing and the timing of your footwork.

    The footwork thing is a bigger animal vs. the takeback part even though it will still be a habit to break.

    So, are there any artists or video specialists to help me explain this? Also, I am learning how to use my video editing software. However, I have a long way to go to be any good. So, when I get good at this, I will be able to doctor up some clips to explain the things I am saying.

    Did you do the exercise I provided above? The one about rocking the racquet back and forth in front of you? Too bad you are not in the area I am in, I would have only charged you $25 and perhaps just asked for a six-pack of Guiness and solve the backhand takeback issue in about 5 minutes.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  20. shell

    shell Professional

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    Tennisguy, I've been following this thread but have not chimed in because I have nothing better than the advice and help you are getting.

    But now you really seem frustrated, so maybe you can hear it if it is said just a little differently. Hopefully I don't say something incorrect (and BB just call me out if I do :) )

    When I first saw your video, what struck me was the rushed look of your stroke. Late preparation was what I would have said. BB is right of course, in that you really don't prepare much at all. He is trying to get you to take that racquet back quicker, with a simple pattern or movement, so that you can focus on the rest of the stroke.

    I learned old way. Racquet back low, swing through the ball and finish high. Maybe you could use a dose of that.

    As soon as you see the backhand coming, turn sideways with your elbows close to your body (yours are pretty far from your body - this is the loopy part you are hearing about). I think the racquet would go pretty close to a correct backswing from there. This would eliminate your hugh swing pattern and concentrate on the key area (a simple smiley face pattern) with your hands. All you may have to add would be a slightly upward pull with your right hand to guide it (a slight bend in your right, or takeback, arm) BUT you have to get it on back there :)

    BTW, you do a similar last min. preparation with your forehand, so maybe it is just a style difference from me.

    Keep it simple for a bit. Think quick takeback, think simple takeback. The smiley will come :)
     
  21. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Ah, I think you may be onto something here. I can see how his extended arm during the take back could very well be what's holding him back. Good advice.
     
  22. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Good explanation, came at it with a different angle and offered good advice from a different perspective.

    When you said "pull the racquet up with your right hand" did you mean the left? The lefthand will be on the throat of the racquet so when the person just turns the shoulders and allows the racquet to turn with it (thus bringing it back) all he needs to do is pull up with the left hand to make the first half of the smile pattern.

    Is this what you meant? I hope so, because it is easy to explain this way.

    In this video, notice how Blake turns sideways (look at this shoulders and hips) to the ball. His hitting hand/racquet turns with the body but does not really move in relation to his naval. The handle of the racquet stays near his naval the whole time even though the relation of the hitting face turns facing the side fence.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTyyITw-fyo

    Now, when he is near sideways, he raises the racquet with his hitting hand slightly or his non-hitting hand or both to initate the first part of the smile pattern for the hitting hand. All it does is move up and back about 6 inches. Very short distance. This is much different than the long hand path travel than our friend Tennis777 has.

    So the hitting hand stays put during the unit turn, and at the end of the unit turn, it rises slightly for the racquet drop and acceleration in the forward swing. This is what club players should be mastering in their onehanded backhand.

    Do you see this?
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  23. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    This is a problem with written text as medium of communication. We've devoted pages of advice which Tennisguy is having a tough time following. It's not so much his fault as the difficulty of using text to communicate a physical movement. There's something lost in translation.

    A quick 10 minute in-person session (or video) would clarify the mental block Tennisguy is having trying to figure out what is being said. Hopefully he'll get a few words of advice that gets him on the right track, or maybe plunk some money down to get some good coaching. He probably just needs one session to at least start getting the idea of what to do, though several sessions might give him the reinforcement needed.

    Good luck, Tennisguy!
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  24. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Sort of. I think a lot of it also comes from the different advice he is getting rather than isolating one thing.

    Doubt it. Not many tennis teaching pros teach what I am showing, especially concerning the smile pattern. I usually have to show a lot of pros about this and show them on film as to what should happen. This is not easily seen or learned and it is rarely taught. Many pros teach the unit turn but dont see the hitting hand pattern.

    If you dont like this medium, maybe you ought to move on? It seems you still frequent this site to learn something. If it is so bad, why are you still here? You have been negative towards this medium ever since I criticized your strokes. What gives? Did you not understand soemthing? So what if we communicate here? So what if people come here to learn, ask questions, want further explanation, and socialize at the same time? What do you care? Aren't you benefiting from free advice? So what if people get confused in the learning process. So fricking what!!!

    Still would like to know your relationship to Will. Are you his father? Are you related to his father in any way?
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  25. Charlzz

    Charlzz Rookie

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    Text is still the easiest way for most people to convey information. You do what you can with the advice given. It's useful to know it's limitations, that's all. There is a reason why tennis lessons are given in person and not via email. The benefit of text is the low barrier of admission. Just because I don't think it's the best medium for communicating some ideas doesn't mean I think it's useless. Otherwise, I wouldn't bother checking out the group.

    I am not related to Will in any particular way. I happen to like his website. I've never met Will before.
     
  26. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    No kidding. So are you here to "enlighten" us about its limitations? Did our good Lord finally answer our request for a Talk Tennis Bulletin Board Savior? Are you the one?

    This medium is a godsend to many thousands of tennis players across the world. Yes, the damn world!

    Many tennis players live in areas that they do not have access to lessons from pros or tennis clubs nor the means to go learn about this great sport like some people do. Some people dont have access to ball machines, discretionary money, video cameras, or anything but a court, three tennis balls, and a racquet.

    Their link to understanding tennis is what they get here and I will be damned if you conceited "broom up your butt" people will get by me. You forget that not everyone has the money to hire a pro. You forget that some of these people like to use the internet to communicate their take and insight at this site.

    This site is a gold mine for many thousands of players. Not everyone needs an explanation like you do. Many people dont even post and simply browse, get what they want, and leave.

    At this site, we have access to text, graphics, videos, and several knowledgeable pros. We have racquet experts, video experts, phsycial training experts devoting their time and effort to help people here learn.

    The trouble with you is you hop on a some low percentage "thing" because you dont get it, and blow it up into something that is not. You exaggerate about the many posts when you fail to see the conversation that is happening.

    Read, writing, and learning is very good for people. It is good for coaches as well because writing forces you to bring your thoughts together and organize your communication.

    Thousands of people have learned at this site, and I will be damned if you, a newbie, comes here and dishes it.

    Of course, there are other means available to players to learn tennis. What is unfortunate is you dont see this is one of them.

    And guess what, I dont care if I have to type the answer a BILLION times, my goal is for people to learn tennis for free. My goal is to allow people here to expand their insight and teaching capabilities so that all of us can make this site the best teaching site in the world. That means there will be checks and balances. It also means it wont be perfect just like a tennis lesson on court is not perfect.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  27. shell

    shell Professional

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    Hey BB, glad I didn't confuse things for tennis777. Tennis777 is a lefty, so I meant the right hand (the throat hand) to pull up slightly with the hand that is on the throat, or slightly bend the elbow to do the same effect.
     
  28. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Ahahahaha, yes, you are right. Forgot about that one. Good job!

    Yes, it is turn with your racquet and pull up slightly as you are about to complete your turn.
     
  29. shell

    shell Professional

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    Off topic a bit, but while I was thinking about it...

    BB, I often print some of your posts. I use them for a quick "lesson". I don't really need someone to "teach" me how to hit a stroke, but I often need someone to "yell :twisted:" at me when I get lazy or if something is breaking down a bit. A quick glance at your detailed "lesson" is often enough to get me back on track. I keep them in my tennis bag for reference.

    Just wanted to thank you for that. You are a wealth of knowledge, and have a great way of explaining difficult concepts. Much thanks!!! :) I do believe it is valuable to occasionally have a pro take a look at your strokes and play, but I also very much agree that this is an invaluable forum for teaching - on it's own, or in addition to other ways.

    I may not post much, but I wanted you to know that.
     
  30. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Wow ok, I go to work and come back and I got a boatload of info. Will try above advice tomorrow morning. Thanks BB, Shell, Charlzz, Djokovicfan!
     
  31. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Is this better or worse? Because the next and last step would then be to see a lefty hitting the shot on video I think I might be able to understand it better that way.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9lRifWLEkc

    So the smiley is supposed to be the mouth part of a smiley face the arc the " ) " my racquet makes after I take it back and to the side, and before I swing through so basically the smiley is the dropping of the racquet face to be at appropriate height for proper contact?
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  32. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    I think this is important because when I bend my non hitting arm it stops me from taking the racquet back further so I can't initiate the loop keeps the stroke compact.
     
  33. shell

    shell Professional

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    WARNING, I am not a tennis instructor nor teaching pro - so this is just my observations. I defer to BB on all technical points....but,

    I still would love to see you get those arms closer to your body. Think about hanging your arms at ease at your side. Then think about turning your shoulder with yours arms hanging at ease at your side. This is what your arms should be doing. It is what BB was talking about with the "rock the baby". Do you rock a baby with your arms straight out? No, you rock a baby with your arms close to your body. This is what gives you control over your swing. Too much motion is where anyone can break down. Keep it simple and close to you. You are in more control of your motion there.

    The other thing I saw as I read this thread was the bounce, hit drill. I had not really seen that at first, but after rewatching your videos I saw it very clearly. Your whole prep. (backswing) is done AFTER the ball bounces. A much better way is to say bounce and then immediately start your forward weight transfer. Bounce, transfer weight forward, hit. If you wait until the bounce to START your stroke, you are LATE. And trust me, you will feel it in a match situation, or against heavier shots than those ball machine feeds.

    To answer your question, yes, you have the smiley better than before. But still, you need to address this issue of late preparation to get the full effect.

    Please take this as a grain of salt - you have a nice backhand as it stands. I am not knocking your stroke at all, but I bet you could beef it up if you work on a few basics. Every time my BH breaks down, I think about these things, and immediately see what I was doing wrong. It is all about the basics every time. We are not pros. It is great to watch them and learn from them, but the basics are what breaks down for us. Simplify your takeback by tucking those arms. Simple takeback close to your body will give you more control over your motions. More control and less motion will provide more consistent results.

    The backhand is a simple stroke, but yet so difficult :)

    You have inspired me to go out and work on my own backhand!!!
     
  34. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    ^^^^
    now look at this video below it is of me doing the 1 hander progression with the right hand as if I was a righty now tell me is it just me or was I meant to be right handed?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07EY3IB8tWo
     
  35. shell

    shell Professional

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    Yep, and your loop should be very small. Not even really a loop. Each of us will have our own style, but small and compact is the best way to start. Avoid a big loop until, or if, it works for you later on. Gasguet is one in a million - seen as a prodigy from the age of 5. I was not, and I bet you aren't either :) Let him have his loop. For us, it just is not going to work!
     
  36. shell

    shell Professional

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    Video not available.
     
  37. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Damn youtube, took 1 min to upload but 15 mins and counting to process, go figure!
     
  38. shell

    shell Professional

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    The smiley is the tracing that your butt hand makes as it goes through the air. With your racquet back, the butt hand is slightly above your waist (the up turn of the smile), then your racquet drops as you release your back hand and swings downward then upward through the ball ( the middle part of the smile), then you complete your follow through high (the other up turn of the smile).

    Yep, what you said.
     
  39. shell

    shell Professional

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    Looks the same as your lefty. Better, and a good smiley, but still out too much. Keep your arms closer to your body. Relax and let it flow back.

    You will get this!!!!
     
  40. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    There's still the same loop in this video. Are you focusing on the hitting hand? I noticed that you said "the racquet should make a smiley face", are you concentrating on that instead of the hand?
     
  41. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Thanks very much Shell. I appreciate your comments. Sometimes I grow weary because we have so much information on this site but it seems people keep posting on largely the same issues. Such as "should I switch from a onehander to a twohander, please help." :) Or, "should I copy Nadal's forehand or Federer's?" :-|

    And you are right, difficult concepts are difficult concepts. No matter what medium is chosen. A difficult concept may not be understood even with video. Even video needs to utilize graphics, examples, analogies, etc...to get a point across and you still will have people not understanding. If the person explaining the information is poor at verbal communication and organizing his thoughts, a subpar video is the result.

    I remember being on the court with certain people needing things to be explained in detail and they still didnt get it. I actually find that it is easier to explain complicated topics here because it is written once (even though there are followup explanations and is why I edit a lot), usually a video clip or picture for the example, and the person can read it as many times as they want so it can sink in.

    This notion that video or an on-court lesson solves everything is false. Many people can attest to lousey on-curt lessons that were a waste of money. Everyone learns differently with some people getting it quickly and others needing more information. I enjoy wirting so I dont mind explaining things as many times as needed.

    And we have people like you that see it but can provide a different perspective. This is very much like being on-court because I can proceed with the lesson while the student that got it, helps the other student that didn't off to the side. That is exactly what we want here.

    Many of us (NBM, SystemicAnomoly, BeHappy, Mahboob, TennisMastery, Yandell, etc...), largely care about people learning to play sound tennis. Even though we may come at the sport from slightly different angles and experiences, we all understand the fundamentals such as conditioning, good technique, simplicity, practice, footwork, and so on that makes the difference between a mediocre tennis player and an excellent tennis player.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2008
  42. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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  43. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    YES! That is much better. All you did was turn your shoulders and raise the racquet slightly back and up. The handle only traveled maybe a half of a foot in preparation for the drop and forward swing. It did not go up, back, and so on creating a long hitting hand path which spells

    I H-I-T L-A-T-E A L-O-T.

    Because you are yelling the above on court without knowing it, given your old backswing, a good tennis player will ablige by hitting to your backhand to win a bunch of points. As long as you keep sending out the beacon, your opponent answers. ;)

    Now, the next thing is relax the arms and let them naturally be closer to your body. You want some flexiblity in the arm for the take back. Just watch the video again and again and imitate what Blake is doing. We ar enot trying to make your backhand like Blakes, all we are doing is copying the fundamental. When you master this fundamental (it becomes automatic), you will develop your bakchand utilizing this sound aspect of a professional backhand.

    His unit turn brings the racquet back. The right hand slightly raises it and brings it a tad back further. Both hands (non-hitting hand and hitting hand) try to stay within the width of the shoulders. It is simple, it is effective.

    Once you get this little thing down and make it habit, now we can build the structure (footwork, weight transfer, etc...) to improve your backhand.

    I needed this to happen first because remember timing is a huge key for the onehanded backhand. Now, as you master this, what is going to happen here is you will gain control of your racquet head throughout the swing motion. This means your brain is going to be able to better calculate where the head of the racquet is at all times. This will allow you to make adjustments with your body to help lower the racquet to the right level (usually a foot below the ball) to meet the ball on time and hit cleanly. Just this little change will improve your ability in these areas.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2008
  44. shell

    shell Professional

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    Good work tennisguy!!!!! This new video shows much better timing with your prepartation. Did you feel less rushed? Because you did not look nearly as rushed. That is a backhand that I would not be so quick to attack. Your previous vids showed a late preparation and I would have said to myself "lets hit some deep topspin and mix in some deep pace, because that backhand is going to break down during this match." Now you are preparing earlier, and I really think once this becomes automatic you will feel you have much more time and less breaking down under pace, depth or stress.

    Well done!!!
     
  45. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    You seem to have learned the smile pattern in the sense that you can shadow the motion decently, but you still need practice to get this down in an actual hitting session. In this video you're still hitting with your old backswing. Since you're so used to it after developing this bad habit for 9 years, you will need to practice hard to break it. But in order to fix it you need to understand what the proper pattern should look like. You should be able to tell that your backswing is loopy in this video.

    Keep up the hard work and you'll get it.
     
  46. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    Do you guys have a list of left handed pros whom I can emulate their one handed backhand stroke? It would be easier to compare side by side with my stroke so I can eliminate the loop. Most lefty players use 2 hander and not many to begin with.

    Lopez is only one comes to mind!
     
  47. oneguy21

    oneguy21 Banned

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    Does it necessarily have to be a lefty's? If not, a good example to emulate would be Federer's.
     
  48. Tennisguy777

    Tennisguy777 Professional

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    I'd prefer it to be a lefty as I have already seen Blake's and Federer's
     
  49. RoddickAce

    RoddickAce Hall of Fame

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    John McEnroe also comes to mind...but his groundstrokes aren't the best out there...
     
  50. oneguy21

    oneguy21 Banned

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