1. Topspin101

    Topspin101 Rookie

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    Hi guys. Great site for a beginner like me. Thanks. Is there any "rule of thumb" regarding proper tension? I understand the properties of more vs less tension. If someone asks what do the pro's recommend is there a standard?

    Thanks/Don
     
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  2. Squidward

    Squidward Rookie

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    Alot of it is trial and error. Depends on where you're at now and what you're looking to achieve.

    Typically, I'd start in the middle of the recommended range of your racquet (Unless you're already certain of what you want as far as tension).

    That being said, alot depends on the type of string you plan to use (poly, multi, synthetic, natural gut...). What have you used before, what do you like, what type of game do you have, what type of stroke do you have, etc...?

    It's not really cut and dried as to what proper tension you string at unless you can answer these questions.
     
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  3. Topspin101

    Topspin101 Rookie

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    Thank you SQWD. If a client/customer asks for my recommendation, I would certainly ask her all the questions you pose to determine her level of play and what she wants to achieve. If a racket tension calls for 58 +/- 5lbs and she wants more control do you add 2lbs to mid or 5lbs? That's what I am looking for.

    Don
     
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  4. VeeSe

    VeeSe Rookie

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    Most lower level players (almost all of us, I'm talking like NTRP 4.0 and below, which pretty much is all rec players) cannot really notice a few lbs of difference in tension, so I would say that you should deviate by more vs. less when asked. However, I don't think you should go too high over the recommended tension on the racquet. On your own racquets, feel free to do whatever you want, but on a customer's racquet, I would just not go over to be safe.
     
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  5. Squidward

    Squidward Rookie

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    Again, it depends. What string is she using now? What does she like/dislike about the string? What is her age, playing level, type of racquet? Has she ever had the racquet restrung? If so, what did she use at that time? Why did she change? Does she have tennis elbow or pain in the shoulder? What does she want the string to do for her. Is cost an issue?

    Lots of variables. You need answers to these before you can recommend anything. Plus, I wouldn't recommend a string unless I was familiar with the way it performs.


    Good Luck!
     
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  6. Topspin101

    Topspin101 Rookie

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    Thank you Squid for the reply. You are going tech on me. I am somewhat familiar with the sport. I started playing at Forest Hills and the Atlantic Beach Club at the age of 12. Strung at 13 and played HS and College team tennis (Yale). Both of my boys played college team tennis as well (Brown). I just retired and all my T-Buds want me to string for them. Thus the dumb questions.... Scottsdale, price is not an issue. Local tennis shop charges $25 labor plus strings. So a good string plus is $45+......
     
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  7. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    I'd say just keep to the mid range of the frame for syngut, mid-hi for multi and at the bottom or 2# under for poly.

    Unfortunately, a lot of people know about the higher=control and lower=power and that's about the extent of their knowledge.

    I'm gonna go out on a limb here and guess that a lot of your T-Buds are older people who are either using big, light Hammers or pulled their old faithful heavy 80's sticks out to play and there's a good chance that they've had the strings in far too long.
    If you replace a two year old set with fresh strings at mid tension, they'll get more control and if you replace PSGD with Xcel, they'll get more power.

    I'm not being mean. I'm in Vegas, so I get that all the time, except that money's tight here so I'll go with Sensation instead of Xcel.

    I see a lot of cool old racquets come out of the garage that are in desperate need of new strings and grips.:)
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
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  8. Topspin101

    Topspin101 Rookie

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    F8son, Thank you. Spot on. Yes, my T-buds are mostly retired but they play most everyday and own the latest and greatest. Tennis is big with the younger women here as well. The economy is improving but I don't care how much money you have, people complain about having to pay $45+ for a sting job! I suggest syngut and avg around $27.....
     
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  9. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I can fully understand the issue with price in relation to stringing, that's why I started stringing my own racquets. With gas and tolls, it costs $40 per racquet to get strung professionally. I go through strings after about 4 weeks, so it doesn't make sense to spend so much money on professional jobs. The money I've saved in string jobs has already paid for the machine itself.

    As to your question, you should have a conversation with your clients first. What tension do they usually get? Are they happy with it? If they aren't happy, then why?

    If they aren't sure what tension they get, then get a string meter, such as this:
    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Tourna_Stringmeter/descpageUNIQUE-STRMETER.html
    and see where their existing string jobs are.

    If they aren't sure about why they aren't happy with the tension, but they know that they definitely aren't happy, then you have to work with them and help them to "put into words" what is obvious to their hands and game.

    Lastly, the question of "where to go from here" can surely be asked. What if the tension range of the racquet is 50-60, it's strung at 50 and they just can't get enough power? Then go lower by 2 lbs and try it out. They don't have to stay within the range.
     
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  10. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    Sometimes the 'latest an greatest' can be a problem as well, especially if they fell victim to the car salesman type at the store/pro shop.
    I can see some people bewildered about why they are not getting enough power out of their Six-one tour or enough control from their EXO3 Silver! :)
     
    #10
  11. Squidward

    Squidward Rookie

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    The Stringmeter is more for a referance tension than actual tension.

    It's helpful in determining loss of tension from a previous checked stringbed, but little else. So be careful basing your determination unless you've previously check the racquet.

    My suggestion would be to start from Zero. Choose a good synthetic gut and string to the middle of the recommended range.

    Then use the customers feedback to determine the next plan of attack (if any) for the following stringjob.

    One more thing, $25 for labor on a stringjob is insane (Even In Scottsdale!) I charge $15 which is more the norm. You'll see increased business too!

    Good Luck!
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
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  12. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    +1^^^
    $15 labor is plenty.
    Of course, some people think that lower price=lower quality.
    You will have to disabuse them of that notion.
    Work on developing a consistent technique and keep records.
     
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