The art of doubles

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Wheelson, Apr 14, 2008.

  1. Wheelson

    Wheelson Guest

    I've been hearing great things about this book but it has multiple publishing dates one in 1994 and one in 2007. Will the 1994 edition be more dated? Will the information be different? The main reason I'm asking is because if I get the 1994 version I can get another book that focuses on stroke development rather than strategy I was thinking tennis 2000. Any Ideas or suggestions?
     
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  2. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I would get the latest version. For strokes, I would get Yandels before Bradens. I have Tennis 2000 and it is good but I thought Yandells with his visual style would do the trick and get people started better.
     
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  3. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    The original is a great primer for getting into doubles. There was a thread that Cindy started a little while ago that calls into question (in my mind) the newer edition, although I have not purchased it.
     
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  4. Wheelson

    Wheelson Guest

    Is this more of a beginner book because I'm more of a strong intermediate to lower advanced player. It's always good to go back to the basics but I would be looking for more of an all around book.
     
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  5. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    It is a beginner book for doubles. You mention you are advanced, but don't confuse advanced strokes with an advanced knowledge of the principles of doubles. There are plenty of folks (probably a majority, actually) who have very advanced singles strokes and knowledge, who are quite clueless on the game of doubles.
     
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  6. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Excellent comment! Confusing strokes over play in doubles is a common mistake.
     
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  7. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Why would a book about doubles focus on stroke development? :confused:

    I thought doubles was a game of strategy?

    You have to look at the other players, one may volley very well while the other swings for the fence Sharapova style. The same can be said for their groundstrokes. Not everyone plays the same. There's a lot more to it than hitting with "pretty strokes" IMO.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2008
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  8. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, we had a long thread about both books. I have both.

    Honestly, I think the original version is better for most people. I wouldn't call it a "beginner" book, though. It talks about things like planned poaches, Australian, I formation. It also talks about controlling the net, which is definitely not a beginner concept. There is an assumption that the server and returner are coming to net.

    I would say the original book is useful for anyone new to doubles or anyone who can't figure out why they lose so darn much. I think it is also a useful "universal language," in that if you know the principles in the book, you are better positioned to play well sooner with a partner you only just met. Honestly, I can tell when teammates have not read this book because their ideas about positioning are, um, rather quaint.

    I think the changes in the new version are for very low-level players. The new version comes right out and says the crosscourt lob is the most devastating shot in tennis, and the strategy in the book is designed to guard against that shot. That may be true at 2.5-3.0, but I think higher-level players would eat you alive if you follow the positioning in the new version.

    Anywho . . . do a search in League/Tournament and you should find a huge long thread.
     
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  9. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    That can be a good thing though, Cindy. It's kind of fun hitting out wide aces with the other guy standing 2 feet from the center of the court! :)
     
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  10. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    The book THE ART OF DOUBLES may be a basic read but executing the information suggested with your partner is another thing all together. Not too many club level players understand nor execute the "who has the middle ball" concept well.

    If a club player is serious about doubles, there is no question that this book should be read and integrated into their games. Find what works and use it.

    Fundamentals exist at all levels.
     
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  11. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Haven't read it yet.
     
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