The Djokovic Forehand

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by ahile02, Nov 24, 2009.

  1. ahile02

    ahile02 Rookie

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    Watching the Djokovic-Davydenko match yesterday towards the end on Tennis Channel, the color commentator (I think it might have been Jimmy Arias) remarked the complexity of Novak's forehand, which in turn is why his forehand tends to break down more so than his backhand.

    Talking about how complex it is, Arias referenced to the fact that during the backswing, the string plane on which Novak would strike the ball faces towards the crowd behind him. What effect does doing this cause, and how does it make it his forehand complex? Do you agree with Arias that Novak's forehand mechanics are complex?
     
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  2. Netspirit

    Netspirit Hall of Fame

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    From slow-mo videos on youtube I can only notice that he pulls the racket far behind, and lays back his wrist just a bit to accumulate some tension in his wrist joint (to be released into the ball eventually). This turns the racket face to the back fence.

    Apart from that, the forehand appears quite normal for a western FH grip. Maybe I wasn't looking hard enough.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8AJYfkJ4hc
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2009
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  3. Clay lover

    Clay lover Hall of Fame

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    I think they just mean that he has a high takeback when they talk about the "complexity" of his forehand. Why this "complexity" will make his forehand inconsistent is because if he does not time the forehand as well he will be having problems with it.
     
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  4. paulfreda

    paulfreda Hall of Fame

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    Well if you watch Daveydenko hit his FH, he pre pronates just before he begins his FH swing too.
    Djoko just does it sooner and farther away from the ball.

    But yes, it is more complex requiring more timing than say Murrray's, Blake's, or Ferrer's FH.
     
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  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Wasn't FernandoGonzalez's forehand considered huge? His and DJ look similar to me. A real pro player's forehand.
    JimmyArias, I think I remember, had a loopy longstroking forehand also. His was the anti McEnroe/Connors forehand. Would be interesting to see his loopy forehand on vid.
    Even MY crappy forehand has the racket contact face pointing straight back behind me on most of my forehands... function of full shoulder turn.
     
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  6. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    I think that turning the hitting face of racquet face back to the fence is pretty normal for a western grip
     
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  7. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Yeah, take your normal backswing with a full western and tell me where the strings are facing. Unless your take back is ridiculously small, it's going to be facing the back fence.
     
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  8. paulfreda

    paulfreda Hall of Fame

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    Hawaiian Grip

    Yes, I fully agree that it is natural for the face to look at the back fence with a Western FH grip.

    This is perhaps a subtle point but ....
    When I hit with my Hawaiian FH grip [for fun, never in a match],
    one would expect the face to also look at the back fence as with a Western. But I find myself doing just the opposite and not letting it pronate that far. This is because, I think, the face is so so so already closed with a Hawaiian that it becomes difficult to square the face on forward swing. So the natural position, at least for me, is facing the SIDE fence. JMHE.
     
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  9. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    I think his problems with any stroke breakdown are purely mental. He also tends to double fault in pressure situations, but his serve mechanics are textbook. When he's on, his forehand is right at the top of the mens' game.

    I don't personally like his forehand take-back purely based on stylistic reasons.
     
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