The Fourth Pro Grand Slam Tournament

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by timnz, Sep 27, 2009.

  1. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    I was looking at:

    http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=35241

    And it is very clear that tournament (Pro Tournament of Champions - Forest Hills) was regarded as the Professional World Championships. However, it is not regarded as one of the Pro-Grand Slams ie US Pro, Wembley, French Pro. However, given its clear accolade as the Pro World Championship it obviously was considered 'THE Pro Major tournament of that year (1958).' Similarly I have seen a write up about Hoad beating Gonzales in the same championship final the year afterwards written in the same loftly terms (1959).

    Hence, I was wondering, what years was there a fourth Pro tournament that was worthy of 'Major' status? Or even having a status above the 3 traditional Pro Majors like this 1958 tournament seems to have. From what I can see there seems to be:

    1958 - Pro Forest Hills Tournament of Champions

    1959 - Pro Forest Hills Tournament of Champions

    1967 - Pro Wimbledon

    I am wondering about:

    World Pro Championships in Berlin: 1930's

    Gonzales mentioned some Pro Major he won in Europe in 1952 in Berlin

    What do people think?






    http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=35241
     
    #1
  2. urban

    urban Hall of Fame

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    Indeed, there were some pro champs, which in several years ranked equal or superior to the 3 so called pro majors, Wembley, US pro and French Pro. But they often lacked continuity. The Forest Hills champs of 1957-1959 were supreme events, mostly played in a round robin format. In other years, the US pro indoors played at New York, was probably the fourth event. At the end of the 50s, a Australian Pro was played at Melbourne. The Wimbledon Pro of 1967 was probably the most important pro event of all the 60s, because it paved the way for open Wimbledon.
    The title World Pro however was a bit inflated, because the pros called many champs World Pros for marketing interests, including an Oklahoma event in the later 60s.
     
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