the great willy ! the between the legs shot!

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by salsainglesa, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. salsainglesa

    salsainglesa Semi-Pro

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    I have never tried to learn it, but I am now!
    How do you do it then?

    any pointers?

    grip?

    How is it done?! Its a mistery to me
     
    #1
  2. salsainglesa

    salsainglesa Semi-Pro

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    spin? what spin should i use?!
     
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  3. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Don't do it. It's a stupid, low percentage shot. If you have enough time to do a tweener, you have enough time to either turn around and hit a groundstroke or throw up a defensive lob.
     
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  4. salsainglesa

    salsainglesa Semi-Pro

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    But its great for coordination!! Learning new things and new ways to hit the balls can't hurt, altough this can actually be dangerous...

    But I am brave!! lol
     
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  5. RoddickAce

    RoddickAce Hall of Fame

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    Hold the racquet with an eastern backhand grip / western forehand grip. Now hit the tweener with the racquet face opposite to the face you would use to hit forehands/backhands in front of you.

    Don't be afraid to hit the ball long/too high, aiming higher over the net usually results in a more successful tweener (for me at least).

    When you see a lob, immediately start running back, don't hesitate to look at the ball fall, it will be too late because the lob, if executed well, will have sufficient topspin to pull away from you after it bounces.
     
    #5
  6. salsainglesa

    salsainglesa Semi-Pro

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    ]Hey Roddick ace I like your signature but I think the two handed variation has advantages ;)

    Ok, i will try that tomorrow but more knowledge about timing and spin for example!
    Do you actually hit below your body or is it slightly in front?

    How do I not tear my shins appart?
    or you know, something else.
     
    #6
  7. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    The tweener really has no spin. You're just slapping at the ball. The key is to wait until the ball is as low as possible.
     
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  8. RoddickAce

    RoddickAce Hall of Fame

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    haha if I could pull off any variation of my sig, I'd be happy XD

    But ya, in terms of spin, I hit it relatively flat, but more on the left of the ball (you're facing the fence) to get some sidespin and pace.

    As for your shins, you can get some shin guards :D, or if you watch the pros, they often do small steps to get their feet wide apart before hitting the tweener.

    But for now though, I think you should just try and get the feel of hitting it from a static position so that you're not rushed or pressured.
     
    #8
  9. GetBetterer

    GetBetterer Hall of Fame

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    Continental grip:

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. FedError

    FedError Semi-Pro

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    I've slowly learnt the tweener over the course of the past few weeks - that's not to say that I can hit them perfectly and with pace though.

    I acquired the feel of the shot just by practicing off a wall - it gives you a simple and low bounce to time against.

    Very recently I hit my first successful tweener in practice, although I haven't had the opportunity to hit one in a match yet.

    I decided to add it to my repitoire because it's one of the few shots you can practice while alone, and also sometimes a tweener can be your only option in a point - especially when you catch up to the lob as it is dropping low to your feet. Not to mention bragging rights if you manage to pull it off successfully à la Federer numerous times.
     
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  11. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Yeah, Federer, Nadal, Agassi et all -- stoopid ppl! C'mon lighten up.
     
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  12. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    My pref is a conti grip (or semi-conti). Run it down so that you almost catch up to the bounce point. Now quickly get over the ball just before it is about to bounce again -- hit the ball a few inches or so above the ground. Hope that helps.
     
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  13. xRain

    xRain Guest

    I'd suggest only doing it for fun.
    Make sure that as you swing, the ball is low and between your legs. (Some people try to hit in front of them)
     
    #13
  14. MrFonzi

    MrFonzi New User

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    Make sure you practice your victory celebration as well. Can't have one without the other!!
     
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  15. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    We're not pros. We have nowhere near the ability level that those guys have, and even for them, it's not the smartest shot. Look at Federer, he only goes for the tweener when he's way ahead in the match. He had an opportunity to do one against Simone and also against Djokovic and he chose not to.

    If people want to learn to do them for fun, that's perfectly fine. However, I can't tell you how many times I've seen 12-16 year old juniors going for the tweener in USTA tournaments when they could easily turn around and make a more high percentage shot. People just want to do them to show off and boost their ego.
     
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  16. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    I'd say the one situation where it is a good shot to hit is a lob that you
    barely get to and by the time you get to it, the ball is already pretty low.
    To me it's the easiest way to hit a line drive type shot in this situation.
    (if you don't want to throw up a lob).

    For me, it does make tennis more fun. Other shots to try: dropshots that
    spin back over the net, behind the back shot, overheads from the baseline
    on balls that are not that high (drop down on one knee), extreme sides
    spin dropshots, topspin lobs that bounce near the baseline and bounce
    over your opponent, extreme sidespin underhand serves, reverse spin
    serve, extreme angle dropshots, hitting around the post when pulled wide,
    trying to bounce every overhead over the back or side fence. When I was
    a teen, attempting these kind of shots made tennis more fun. Some, like
    the around-the-post shot are ones you rarely have the opportunity to even
    attempt. Of course, I didn't try them all the time in actual tournament
    matches (except for the bouncing over overheads over the fence and
    crazy angled dropshots).

    haha. I think I was around 15 when I first learned this shot. Once I learned
    it I started hitting it all the time and overused it.
     
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  17. Manus Domini

    Manus Domini Hall of Fame

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    I think that the longest named shot is the "hit on the rise one-handed side spin behind the back drive volley short angle cross court passing shot on the run" 21 words to 15 lol

    But in all honest, tweeners aren't always the best idea. wish I knew how to do the Nastase backfire though :(
     
    #17
  18. jwbarrientos

    jwbarrientos Hall of Fame

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    Just in case... call you insurance agent and review the balls' article

    Later practice.
     
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  19. Fugazi

    Fugazi Professional

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    Have to disagree on this one. I hit a pretty good tweener myself (NRTP around 5.0 or 5.5), and I can assure you that a continental/slightly more open continental grip is the way to go. Hitting the tweener with the opposite racquet face of a western FH grip is just too extreme, it will be uncomfortable and will provide no power (you're gonna break your wrist...). Using a continental or an extreme continental grip with good pronation will provide good power and feel.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
    #19
  20. Fugazi

    Fugazi Professional

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    My point exactly. Either continental or a slightly more extreme version of continental. Notice the excellent pronation from frame 4 to frame 5.
     
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  21. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Well, its a great recruiting tool for the Vienna Boys Choir.
     
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  22. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, players want to have fun or boost their ego. What is so wrong with that? Even tho' I'm not a pro, I've won a very high percentage of rallies when I've emplyed the technique. If one is overusing the stroke and losing more points than not becuase of it, then I could see your point.

    However, along with providing an ego boost, it can also yield a confidence boost. Here is its real benefit. If you pull it off (or even come close is a desparate situation), it will often give you a boost for subsequent points. Sometimes you've got to look at the bigger picture.
    .
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2011
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  23. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Fun is fine if you don't care about the result. If you're trying to win the match, leave the tweener in the bag.

    From what I've seen, the tweener is pretty much never the smart shot to play for amateurs. Like someone said, it would be the only option if you were running for a lob and it was just about to hit the ground. However, in my experience, no normal players can make the shot in that situation. The only time they can make it is when they get there in time, purposely let it drop low and then hit it. If they have enough time to do that, they should turn around and make the better shot.

    Again, perfectly fine if they just want to be able to do the shot while goofing around with friends or something like that. But using the tweener in 3.0-4.0 match play? Not a good idea.
     
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  24. Manus Domini

    Manus Domini Hall of Fame

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  25. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Conti to conti with ebh flavor for sure.
    Only try this on sliced lobs, so the ball sits up and doesn't keep moving towards your backboard.
    Don't followthru too far with your rackethand.
    I try to get my head right up against the falling (dropping) ball after it's bounce, so I only need a small adjustment to get into position.
    You hit it any way you can, but oftentimes, you get some topspin or forward spin if you take the shot low to the ground.
     
    #25
  26. obtn

    obtn Rookie

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    Tennis is serious business, guys.
     
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  27. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Not really sure, when you're forced to chase down a lob all the way back to your baseline, that, upon facing the wrong direction (your own backboard), it's really better or worst to hit a normal backhand or forehand from there.
    Mostly, it's a blind shot, you having run all that way. Mostly, you know the lobber is now camped at service line awaiting your lob. Since you know where he is, you hit either CC shortangle or DTL, both you can do with a between the leg shot almost as well as a blind turnaround groundie.
    And if you never have fun, you might never get any good at tennis.
     
    #27
  28. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    In case you haven't noticed, there are over 20,000 threads on this forum. 20,000 threads in which people ask afor dvice on how to get better. They want to get better so they can win their matches. People on this forum spend hours per week practicing so they can improve and compete at a higher level. Yet, you think it is silly of me to discourage going for a shot that is counterproductive to those goals?

    Nothing wrong with hitting a tweener when you're fooling around with friends, or just hitting. In match play, though, it's just not a smart shot, especially for recreational players.
     
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  29. obtn

    obtn Rookie

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    You take yourself way too seriously. Lighten up.
     
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  30. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Lol, I always laugh at the "you take yourself too seriously" argument. The person using it is encouraging lightheartedness, yet they're jumping straight to judging the character of the person at which they are directing the phrase.
     
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  31. obtn

    obtn Rookie

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    My point is, the original poster didn't ask if the shot is viable and whether or not he should be using it. He asked for pointers on how to do it.

    I'm sure you are just trying to add some constructive feedback, but if the guy wants to use it in matches, that is his prerogative. Not everyone is dead-set on using "proper" shots the whole match, and it has already been shown in previous posts and the video that sometimes it can change your mental outlook on the match.
     
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  32. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Fair enough. You're right, he can use them in a real match if he wants to. However, I thought it was important for him to know that it was not a high percentage shot. I don't know how much he knows about the game, he could think that it's the best shot to hit when you get a lob, spend lots of time practicing it, and then find out it's a low percentage shot after it was too late. Just for the record, I also provided some tips about the shot and stressed that it was perfectly fine if it was used for fun.
     
    #32
  33. salsainglesa

    salsainglesa Semi-Pro

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    Every idea is valid! why should you or shouldn't, I liked what many people said already!
    The confidence boost is quite important. I liked that one.
    The tactical approach too.
    And well, having fun is necesary to get good too!

    I can agree or disagree and that doesn't make my point of view right or wrong. Niether anyone else's.
     
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  34. mucat

    mucat Hall of Fame

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    In this case, I have to disagree. And you can say goodbye to your willy.
     
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  35. jhick

    jhick Semi-Pro

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    I just successfully pulled off a tweener this past week. Hit it in doubles with two at the net. The net guy hit a semi drop shot, but it gave me time to get to it and hit a lob winner on the next shot. I had a crowd watching me and they got all excited.

    That said, I practiced this shot quite a bit in college and know how to hit it. If you don't practice it, I wouldn't try it as you may look foolish doing so. Sometimes I like to hit it mainly because my opponent pays more attention to what I'm doing than hitting the next shot back. The key with the shot is not to rush it; you have more time than you think.
     
    #35
  36. jhick

    jhick Semi-Pro

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    Agreed.

    10char
     
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  37. jhick

    jhick Semi-Pro

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    If you attempt a tweener correctly, there is pretty much zero chance you'll do this. It would be more likely you'd hit one of your shins, but even that is fairly unlikely if you pay attention.
     
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  38. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    As I stated previously, my own experience is contrary to your assertions. In the past it's been effective for me. But it should be consistent and be used judiciously to be effective.

    I don't know any 3.0 players that can really pull off this shot. Very few 3.5 players for that matter either. However, as a 3.5 player (some 20 yrs ago), I developed into an effective stroke. Was still winning points with it (more often than not) at a 4.5/5.0 level.

    Note: In order to hit a normal groundstroke when chasing down a lob, a player must run past the ball in order to execute. This can be particularly challenging in some situations, especially on the backhand side. To execute the the tween, a player on need to catch up to the ball -- no need to run past the ball to execute. One needs to be a bit quicker in order to hit groundstroke instead.
     
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  39. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    I have banged the shins more than once but have never even come close to endangering the jewels.
     
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  40. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Yeah, because 3.0 match play is just life or death.
     
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  41. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Already addressed this. There are 20,000 threads where people ask for advice that can help them win. People on this board play hours of tennis per week, and I've seen lots of advice where people suggest hitting hundreds of serve per week. For some reason, though, discouraging low percentage, show-boat moves in a competitive match is over the top?

    Oh, and is any game or match really life and death? Is a D1 college tennis match life and death? Is a college football game life and death? No, they have as much value as the players and fans put on them.
     
    #41
  42. obtn

    obtn Rookie

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    I think Hunter has expressed in his other posts that he is merely trying to state that the shot is low percentage. While he may have come on a little strong, I believe his intentions are good.

    While the shot is fun, and in some cases may actually be the only viable shot, it is rare that those occurrences actually happen, and I think Hunter is just advising to be aware of the situation and whether it really necessitates such a low percentage shot.

    For someone trying to win a match, this is something to take into consideration. Not everyone is merely playing to win though. :)
     
    #42
  43. mucat

    mucat Hall of Fame

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    You are going to have to prove it to me...wait, scratch that.
    No, I don't mean you scratch THAT...I mean.......not going well...
     
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