The quickest way to improve your game is to run more

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Maximagq, Apr 3, 2014.

  1. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    How many of you guys have played sports at a high schoool or college level? I ask only because -

    The most endurance related sport I ever did was wrestling. Similar to tennis in terms of explosive movement, and a need for stamina.

    We warmed up with 3 mile runs. Every day, 6 days a week. That was nothing, just the start.

    We wrestled and did drills..etc for 2 hours then closed with HITT drills.

    You think it didnt help? Honestly, it was a must to make weight and then survive on the mat.

    To me, tennis is similar. If your opponent is as consistent as you, it is a battle of will. Who loses focus first? Who cant handle the summer heat?

    Thats why you run. Sorry I sound like LeeD here but the OP is a very nice high level view of what needs to be done.
     
    #51
  2. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    I don't believe you OP. The quickest way is to hire a top pro and let him drill you as many as hours as you can physically take each day.

    The second quickest way would be enroll in the bollerteri academy (or another top tennis academy) and play there for a few years.

    I got to think long distance running is way down the list for average tennis players. It might really help your game OP but some people don't have your strengths (high level of play and very consistent strokes)..
     
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  3. torpantennis

    torpantennis Legend

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    Great stuff, and I mostly agree. I think you're right in that I've developed the aerobic base in the past, so that's why I can concentrate more on higher intensities.

    But OTOH, there seems to be something magical with HIIT. That great article you linked says:

    "Timmons had tested Mosley for a number of health indices before he started, and then, after his 4 weeks of HIT, Mosley went back to the lab to be re-tested. A main test was for insulin sensitivity. Mosley was particularly keen to see this result as his father had been a diabetic and had died from complications linked to the disease. When they measured Mosley's insulin sensitivity before he started his HIT exercise regime, the result showed he was just inside what would be regarded as healthy tolerance.

    Timmons told Mosley that research from a number of centres shows that doing 3 minutes HIT a week can improve insulin sensitivity by 24%. And this is exactly the amount by which Mosley's own index improved."

    So huge health gain in terms of risks for diabetes can be gained with only 4 weeks of HIIT training. What's interesting is that my family has had a tendency for diabetes. In the past, when I was only training aerobically, I always felt really cold and chilly after eating, i.e blood sugar levels were most propably affected by the meals. But nowadays I never get that chilly feel anymore, i.e blood sugar stays more stable? In addition to sports performance benefits, it seems that HIIT also has some very important health benefits. I'm a believer!
     
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  4. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Running long slow distance once a week is probably not going to hurt your game but it is not close to being the quickest way to improve it.

    Take two players of equal ability who play an equal amount of rec tennis each week and have one do a 30 minute run once a week and have the other spend 30 minutes with a teaching pro on court doing drills and working on technique.

    I'm going to put my money on the latter player beating the former 100% of the time starting at the end of week 1 and thereafter.
     
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  5. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    There are a wide variety of tennis players with varying disposable cash, time, stress, etc. Running long, slow, distance can be quite relaxing or even fun with one or more partners or a podcast.
     
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  6. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    Setting aside the financial side of this argument, you're assuming that the players in question have the ability to assimilate what is being taught and the teaching pro will actually push the student to change his/her technique.

    I've seen players who have taken regular lessons for years without picking up anything. They still have weak backhands, unreliable serves, etc. I don't know if this is because the players are unable to learn new techniques or the pros are unwilling to push them to make major changes. But either way, I haven't seen any significant improvement.

    And even if a player is the type who can learn new techniques and the pro is willing to push for change, in the short term, if the player has to make major changes to one or more stroke, then he/she will most likely play worse at first. In the long term, the player will probably be better off. But in the short term, he/she will most likely struggle to incorporate the new technique in a match situation. For some, it takes a long time to not only build up the muscle memory but also build up the confidence to use new strokes in difficult match situations.

    On the other hand, the player who exercises more won't be changing any technique and will only be improving his/her fitness. There are no struggles with new strokes, dips in confidence, or anything like that. There's only improved fitness (which often leads to improved confidence as well).

    My money is on the player focusing on fitness for at least the first 3 months.
     
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  7. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    It is too bad we can't actually bet because I wouldn't hate to take your money.
     
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  8. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    Let me ask you this. Let's say you've lost the first set, you're facing break point in the middle of the second, and you've got a midcourt ball to your backhand. Are you going to use the new backhand that you learned last week and you've been struggling with throughout the match, or are you going to revert to your old backhand that you had for years? If you do choose to use the new backhand, are you going to swing with confidence or is it going to be a case of hit and hope?

    If you want to know what the psychological effect of a major change is like, try playing a couple of sets with a friend or family member that you hate losing to, but mimic someone else's serve rather than your own. For example, pick a pro whose serve is significantly different from yours and try to copy his/her motion.

    After you've lost the first set and it's becoming obvious that you're going to lose the second, if you really care about winning/losing, then I guarantee you that you'll switch back to your normal serve.
     
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  9. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I've gone through major changes, continental to eastern and eastern to semiwestern, and both transitions took about six month to where I was completely comfortable with the new grip.

    Some tennis techniques you can pick up more quickly but you have to practice them before they become ingrained to the point where you'd use them effectively in a match.
     
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  10. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    Is it the interval training that helps to build your "fast twitch" muscles? I hear tennis commentators talk about that kind of stuff all the time.
     
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  11. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Where did I write anything about completely revamping the strokes of the player working with a pro? I've taken less than a dozen lessons so I'll admit to not being an expert on working with a pro but both of the pro's I worked with asked me what I wanted help with, fed me balls, rally-ed with me, or watched me hit, and gave me tips which I believe really improved my game. My evidence of that is that I had played our local doubles league as a 3.5 since 2005 winning about 50% of my matches. I took those lessons in 2012 and went 18-1 and then in 2013 got bumped to a 4.0 where my record is 6 and 9. My team has won the local 4.0 league the last two seasons running and are in first with a 3-0 record this season and my captain who is pretty competitive and wants the three peat has enough confidence in my game to play me on court 1, even in the last league playoffs.

    That 4.0 record is not great I'll admit but I'm always competitive in my matches and frankly in many of my losses I was the better player on our team. When I play with my favorite partner who I've played the most with I'm 5-2. I made some other changes around that time like losing some weight and hitting more with my ball machine so I can't attribute my better play 100% to my lessons but I absolutely know that they were a significant if not a majority of the reason for my improvement. I also know that I didn't do any additional or different fitness routines during that period so I don't believe that was much of a factor.

    I'm sure you can find bad pro's out there who may hurt a player's game but I think they are a small minority and even hitting with a bad pro won't hurt you if you are intelligent enough to know what you can or can't change in your game and then only adopt the changes to your game that you feel help it. On the other hand I don't feel simply running 30 minutes a week more than another player is going to give anyone any kind of appreciable advantage in fitness on a tennis court, particularly in doubles but even in singles. Clearly you disagree which is I believe allowed on these forums but I think I'll stick with my original assertion anyway.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2014
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  12. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    How do you feel about running 30 miles a week in providing a fitness advantage?
     
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  13. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Well I'm kind of biased in that I've been a distance runner longer than I've been a tennis player, starting from running track and CC in junior high, then high school, then very competitive intramural running in college, and later running hundreds of distance races after college for over 20 years as an adult. From college on, I typically ran 50 to 60 miles a week year round including a lot of fartlek and interval work on a track and racing events from 5k's (a 17:19 at age 34 was my fastest 5k fwiw) up through multiple marathons. My PRs aren't spit in the big scheme of running but did win me a few age-group ribbons and trinkets.

    I bring all that up because I believe running 30 miles a week will get you in decent shape for ...running. I think there is some aerobic benefit that will transfer over to tennis but I think in my own case I'd have been a much tennis player when I was running a lot if I had done a lot more quickness drills and plyometric work and done less of the 50 to 60 miles a week.

    That said, I haven't run a race in over a decade. When I was transitioning from running so much to other sports and eventually tennis I tried martial arts for several years because a good friend was going to the same instructor. We did a ton of submission grappling and I learned very quickly that my great running shape meant diddly squat on the mat when rolling because I gassed very quickly compared to the guys who were used to it.

    So I think there is some benefit to running 30 miles a week but I think the same time spent doing it could be used more efficiently and effectively to improve tennis-specific conditioning. I'm just a 55 year old local league 4.0 trying not to embarrass himself and his captain so wtf do I know?

    I somehow get the impression that the spaceman believes I'm arguing that you shouldn't do any off-court conditioning which I am certainly not. I'm responding to the OP's assertion that 30 minutes of running a week is quickest way to improve your tennis which I don't agree with at all. My belief is that same 30 minutes spent with a tennis pro will translate to much bigger improvements in both the short and long run. That belief is based on my own situation which I already wrote about and other players who've similarly benefited from working with a pro.
     
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  14. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    Not all 30 miles per week are created equal. It will depend on your intensity. You don't really sprint all out much in tennis (though for some reason that is the prevailing belief), but you don't jog at the equivalence of a 12 min mile either.

    This is where your aerobic fitness focus needs to be as it relates to tennis. FWIW, I've found running in the 150 bpm range works well for me for tennis conditioning. I know that I would benefit from intervals, but I don't like to do them (too lazy).
     
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  15. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Even swimming at leisurely 120 BPM, I feel a huge gain in cardio conditioning for tennis.
    Beat's sitting home reading Jack Reacher paperbacks.
     
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  16. torpantennis

    torpantennis Legend

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    Make fun out of it. The point is to build that springy feel of sprinters, instead of the lazy feet feel of long distance runners. Just go to a walk with a friend and have some very short sprints during walking. Also run the stairs up in everyday life. Get those fast twitch muscles active!
     
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  17. 14OuncesStrung

    14OuncesStrung Rookie

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    I've played tennis for 15 yrs and I've never jogged once in my life for fitness. You're better off working on your strokes first, then focus on improving your core strength, agility and flexibility. So long distance running is a BIG NO NO.
    You want to do a mix of weight training, pilates/yoga and interval training.
     
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  18. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    I think you've misinterpreted the subject of this thread. We're talking about the quickest method of improving, not the method that will produce the biggest results.

    You took lessons in 2012 and saw the benefits of them in the 2013 season. I could take some who's in bad shape, get them working on their fitness (not just slow distance running), and see signs of improvement in a week or two, with further improvements over the next several months.

    As for the comments about major changes, the truth is that a lot of players would need major changes to at least one stroke in order to develop a solid all around game. Yes, there are some minor changes that could be implemented to produce minor improvements, but they will plateau at a lower level than they could realistically achieve. Quite often, a major overhaul would be necessary to produce the optimum results.

    However, as I mentioned before, any major change would cause a dip in form as the player adjusts, and that's why a pro might be reluctant to push for significant changes. So you end up with either a player who makes minor improvements and then plateaues or someone who makes major changes and takes a while to get used to his/her new stroke(s).
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
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  19. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    You misinterpreted what I wrote. I took lessons in 2012 and went 18-1 in 2012 then got bumped in early 2013. Actually I may have gotten bumped in late 2012 but it doesn't matter to my point that there was not a large time separation between when the lessons occurred and when I improved my game.

    I have said all I care to say though on the topic so we'll just have to agree to disagree.
     
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  20. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Come on.. A teaching pro isn't always going to give you a new backhand and mess up your game. Truth is a good pro will push your fitness while you are playing tennis.

    This is the best way to increase your fitness for a tennis player because you are ...PLAYING TENNIS. When doing other exercises whether its weight lifting or aerobic training there is SOME crossover in improved athletic performance.

    But the best way to gain skill at athletic activities is to participate in that activity. This is quite obvious and really well known.

    This even goes for conditioning in general. People think that they can train 'balance' and thus be 'balanced' on the court. Problem is there is no generalized 'balance' skill to work on. You get balanced at doing various things. So the best way to increase balance while playing tennis is - try to be balanced while you play tennis! Want to improve your balance while skiing or surfing. Ski or surf!

    This isn't to say there is ZERO benefit. There is crossover. A fit tennis player can practice longer and harder ON THE COURT and thus make more progress. A stronger player can bring more muscles into play and hit with more pace and so on. But if we have to pick the 'best' way to improve a specific skill it's always going to be practicing that specific skill.

    It should only take a nano-second to disprove this theory. I know plenty of people that can run half and whole marathons. Most of them suck at tennis.
     
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  21. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    A lot of people practice tennis inefficiently though and reinforce lazy footwork.

    To rectify that and address the fitness aspect, many clubs do aerobic style tennis clinics where you are running, hitting balls, doing footwork drills and basically moving the entire hour.

    I think they call it cardio tennis here.
     
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  22. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Hi Power Player ....
    Today, I strolled onto court, dropped my bags, strolled to center hash baseline, and did the spider drill to the 5 points and back. I made sure to tap my bad left foot on all the 5 intersections, as I"m lefty and that foot would be the outside foot. I made sure to tap my right foot at the center hash each time, because I actually CAN push off with my right foot.
    20.3 seconds later, I finished with a heartbeat of 132. I started with a heartbeat of 76, my resting heartbeat. Yes, I had a heartbeat monitor I borrowed from some guy sitting on the bench.
    I'd think, in my late 20's, I could break 15 seconds without sweating, possibly even less, as I was always the quickest and fastest to get moving, changing directions, on our basketball and football teams.
     
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  23. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Oh, as I went thru my bag later to rid myself of flat tennis balls, I threw them as far as I could out past the 3 aligned courts.
    Starting at the nearest doubles sideline, all 5 throws ended up hitting over my court, the adjoining court, and the 3rd one beyond, bouncing well past the 3rd court doubles alley, 3 against the 10' high fencing.
    Now this was after my spider drill, and I did not do any shoulder warmups whatsoever.
     
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  24. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    Do you do any barbell work?
     
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  25. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    No, I have rotator cuff problems in both shoulders and also elbow straightening problems on one.
    The fact all my fingers outside the middle have been broken and 3 have pins inserted make lifting heavy objects without lots of padding really painful.
    Also, I have medial collateral problems with my left knee, and the left ankle has torn tendons still not fully attached.
    Better, I have flat feet and pins and screws on both my tib/fibs, so any accident can rebreak or cause complications since all the screws, plates, pins, and wire are still inside both my legs.
    No lifting for me, I have to live with a 5'10" x 150 lbs body just the way it is, sand in the face or not.
     
    #75
  26. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    That's a lot of injuries to work around.
     
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  27. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Oh, I forgot.
    Doing the spider drill puts tremendous stress on the ankles, knees, and tib/fib screw attachments, so I basically went at it about 65% effort and speed.
    When I actually play tennis, I go about 75% max effort, never more. It's easier for me to stop and say "nice shot", then to exert the extra effort to fetch for my opponent.
     
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  28. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A lot of people practice tennis inefficiently though and reinforce lazy footwork.

    Most Cardio tennis I have seen concentrates more on the running around and less on the actual tennis. A pro hitting you non-stop ball combinations can run pretty much anyone into the ground without much effort.

    Tennis is a skill sport - much like golf money will take you pretty far. You do need to find the right pro and take care of your fitness such that you can play..

    People love the idea of cross training - because its hard to find good tennis partners who want to practice and its expensive to find a pro. But liking it and proving its the best way to improve your play at a sport is a real stretch. I can't think of any sport like that.
     
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  29. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    And how many 3.0-4.0 players do you see with fundamentally flawed backhands (and/or other strokes)? Minor improvements to a fundamentally flawed stroke will only lead to a slightly less flawed stroke, and the fundamental flaw will limit the overall progress that can be made. The only way to develop a solid stroke is to make major changes or start over from scratch, which means suffering through a dip in form.

    Also, we're not talking about the best method for overall improvement. We're talking about the quickest method, which many people think is fitness. And the quickest way to improve fitness is to focus on fitness.

    Let's say you've got two identical players who are both out of shape and play tennis a couple of times a week (typical adult players). If one guy spends an extra 20 minutes on court each time he practices and the other spends an extra 20 minutes doing high-intensity fitness drills, then for the first few months, the guy doing fitness drills will improve faster in terms of match results than the guy spending more time on court.

    The guy spending more time on court will make some minor improvements with his strokes and his fitness will be a tiny bit better, but he'll still fade away in the second set of a match and struggle if there's a third. The guy doing fitness drills won't make any technical improvements, but he'll be able to maintain his peak level longer and will fade later and less as the match goes on.

    The guy spending extra time on court won't start beating his twin regularly until his technique has finally reached a level where his faded second-set play is still slightly better than his twin's unfaded peak level.
     
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  30. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Looks like there are some disagreements here. I don't know, personally for me, I found that running a lot and doing fitness helps me a lot when I play matches rather than working on technique and drills.
     
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  31. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Fitness is sport specific. Fitness is activity specific. Yes there is crossover but the best way to say increase your endurance at playing effectively during long points is to hit with a pro for long points. Like I said its unfortunate - we might wish that say having a lot of sex would boost our performance on the tennis court. But it just doesn't work that way..

    The science indicates that the best way to improve at a specific activity is by doing that activity. The catch is that the tennis player with the pro can work on his fitness while playing tennis. Once your normalize your results like that you will see the tennis player comes out far ahead.

    For tennis you need to train both your anaerobic and aerobic systems and well as your balance, agility, hand eye coordination all at once. Guess what activity would do this most efficiently..

    If only it worked like that. Any good triathlon runner will tell you need to increase your sport specific endurance - and not your 'general' endurance. If you don't work on the biking and swimming part you will run out of steam even if you can run marathons.

    Unproven speculation. I would wager just the opposite - for the reasons I outlined above. Science shows us the principle of specifity. The best way to improve a sport is by practicing that sport. Now if that guy runs like 8 hours a week - then yeah maybe the crossover would help. But if we normalize tennis training and long distance running - I'd put my money on tennis training for tennis. <g>

    Of court work is useful for prevent injury and raising baseline fitness such that one can play longer. But most rec players don't suffer from that kind of problem. The simply don't get enough quality playing time. So for them a hour a week with a pro is going to be more useful then an hour of running, IMHO.

    I think we can agree to disagree here. FWIW the OP was saying the quickest way. Maybe he really meant the cheapest way or way that involved the least amount of coordination with others.. Then maybe running would help. I still pick something more sport specific though like footwork drills or suicides..
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2014
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  32. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Okay quickest way is probably the wrong term for me to have used. I should have said easily implementable because a bit of running each session definitely does help boost your stamina tremendously. It has helped me out in a lot of matches. There is no way I could have played out this point if I wasn't in shape from running.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMMnIvP0ilA
     
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  33. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    :):)
    Within the first 23 seconds, both of you could have tried to force the point to conclusion with a faster shot towards either sideline, instead of looping it back hoping your opponent get's bored and misses trying for a better shot.
    Probably you each had 3 opportunities, but both didn't try to end the point.
     
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  34. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Yeah, or we could have made a hasty decision to attack and get passed. The margins are slim in 3rd set breakers and every point counts.
     
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  35. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    Tell me again, what type of running are you doing?
     
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  36. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    I just run at a nice steady pace at my local track about 2-3 miles each session maybe twice a week. Sometimes I sprint, sometimes I just jog, it's mostly just to get the cardio up and build stamina.
     
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  37. Maximagq

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    I should mention that is at the bare minimum. I usually do a lot more running on the court doing exercises.
     
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  38. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    Mmmmmmm.........I've read from people who never actually run (they just read about it) that only hiit is applicable to tennis. These people often say that steady state will make you slower and hurt your tennis. But you are saying that you took the novel approach of actually running and not just talking about it and it actually helped? That's pretty revolutionary.
     
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  39. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Yes, because tennis at its most fundamental core is a game of errors. If you can run all day, you don't have to be as aggressive with your shots and you can play much safer margins. So even if you have a technical deficiency like a weak backhand or a weak serve like I do, if you play with the mentality of making your opponent hit one more ball, it will add up slowly but surely over the course of the match. This is built through running, fitness, cardio, and off court training.
     
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  40. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    The thing is after this point, even though I was huffing and puffing after I lost the point, within 5 seconds, I felt ready to do this again, this time for maybe 70 shots (the next rally was much shorter though if I recall). I was able to keep up this mentality throughout this match and all of the matches I have played. A fitness advantage becomes a huge mental advantage. "If I am going to lose this match, you will have to hit through me for 3+ hours. I'm not going to beat myself."
     
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  41. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    All else being equal - that kind of mental advantage is huge.

    A lot of kids (and adults) may have something else to do or other things on their mind and don't expect a 3+ hour match.

    Of course that doesn't mean that you can't work on your strokes to improve them so that you can make those tougher as well.
     
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  42. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Yes of course technique is also important but what I mean is that if you add running to your training for at least 30 minutes per practice session, if definitely does help a lot.
     
    #92
  43. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    It's cool Max. But you got to realize your excellent consistent game isn't shared by a lot of posters here. Quite frankly I rarely get tired playing tennis. Part of it is that I am really big compared to most guys here so I end up approach the net (for better or worse) and part of it is I am not terribly consistent. What's the average rally length for 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 players. I don't know but I'd be surprised if each player hits more then 5 balls..in most rallies - even at the 4.0 level.
    You are the exception - and not the rule. So what works for you isn't going to work for everyone. Most of us have to work on our consistency to get to your level..(or even close).. Nice rally BTW.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2014
    #93
  44. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    I'd think that jumping rope would be better - also more stylish. You can jump rope while waiting for the court...

    I say this because tennis has been compared physically to boxing. And boxers love to jump rope and run long distances.. :p
     
    #94
  45. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    I agree a lot on jumping rope. That helps me a lot even though I don't do it as often as before now.
     
    #95
  46. maggmaster

    maggmaster Hall of Fame

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    As someone who has skipped rope for an hour it is much easier to run for an hour and you hurt much less the next day. Steady state cardio is one of the only forms of training that gets around the specificity rule. Larger stroke volume, increased capillary density and higher sustainable watts are useful in almost any sport that involves endurance in any way. Even triathletes will do most of their endurance work on the low impact bike. Saving their legs for the race rather than pounding them to death in training. Skip rope and do sprints as a corollary but build your base around steady state work. As a proof of this method most cycling teams training for a pursuit, a 2 minute effort, only add sprints in the last few weeks of training.
     
    #96
  47. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I"m for saving my legs for tennis and windsurfing.
    So swimming became a good workout thru the winter months.
    Unfortunately, now spring, the wind is good and I still want to play tennis. Not much legs left for both.
     
    #97
  48. mad dog1

    mad dog1 Hall of Fame

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    i do miss running on the drake stadium track. loved running there. also loved running around the perimeter of the campus. north on veteran to sunset over to robertson and then down to little sm blvd (gone now) or olympic and then back to veteran.

    and i do agree with you that running is one of the quickest ways to help your game. when i get tired, i find that i make alot of errors as i am unable to get my feet in position and even if i am able to, i'm tired so i have trouble concentrating and focusing on the ball.

    my consistency has improved since i started ~10 miles/week. 3 miles x 3 days.
     
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  49. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Matt, would you mind running the spider drill and tell us your time?
    Start at baseline center hash, run to right singles sideline tap with your right foot, then back, then out to service line/sideline, tap with right foot, back, then to service line center, then back, then out to left service line sideline, tap, then back, and finally to left sideline/baseline, tap with right foot, and back.
    I did 20.3, starting heartbeat 76, ending up at 132.
    I think a good time is somewhere around 15 seconds, but I can't tell, I'll never get anywhere near that.
     
    #99
  50. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Ok ill let you know when I'm out on court next week
     

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