The Vision Thing

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Cindysphinx, Dec 21, 2009.

  1. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I've worn contact lenses for nearsightedness for decades. No problem. They are great for tennis.

    Now I'm pushing 50 and have begun to need reading glasses. This is a total pain in my behind. Unless I'm going to get bifocal glasses (or progressives), I have to keep a pair of reading glasses handy. Or maybe I could get bifocal contact lenses.

    Has anyone tried bifocal contact lenses? Are they good for tennis?

    How about wearing bifocal glasses or progressives? Good or bad for tennis?

    I assume that monovision (wearing just one contact lense for distance and using the uncorrected eye for reading) is out of the question for tennis. True?

    I just had my eyes checked a few weeks ago and forgot to ask these questions. Doh!
     
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  2. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    Cindy- From the sports oriented folks I know that require both corrective lenses and reading glasses none of them like progressive lenses or bifocals. They all prefer singular functioning corrective lenses. Image stability is key when moving so having two corrections in the glasses is suboptimal I guess.
     
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  3. jswinf

    jswinf Professional

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    Bifocal contact lenses are sort of a compromise. They "blend" far and near focus and let your visual system pick what it needs at the time. Lots of people do fine with them, quite a few people find the sharpness of vision doesn't quite make it for them.

    Monovision is a popular option. Personally I prefer the vision I get with monovision, it works really good for me. I feel like it doesn't affect my vision for tennis appreciably during the day, but playing under lights I need to change my "near" eye's lens to a distance lens. So I can't read then but I'm not going to the tennis court to read. Having a pair of reading glasses handy would be smart (but I don't.)

    If you really like contact lenses, I don't think you'd like glasses for tennis. Some people seem comfortable playing tennis with progressive glasses and good for them, but I think they're the exception.

    Hopefully your eye care provider will help you try out some of these options and see what works in your world. Remember, you don't have to use the same correction for everything you do--"maturing" eyes need different tools for different tasks. In the meantime, stick with what you're doing. The folks with perfect distance vision at the same age need reading glasses too!
     
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  4. neverstopplaying

    neverstopplaying Professional

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    I used progressive lenses for the last 2 years but could never get used to them for tennis. I always played tennis with separate glasses with corrections for distance only.

    Recently I underwent a newer type of laser eye surgery an d am very impressed with the results:

    The aspheric profile

    Thanks to Zeiss MEL-80™ Laser, the IRIS Ophthalmology Clinic offers the Presbyopic Laser Treatment, which uses a hyperaspheric laser treatment. This ablation profile is applied on the non-dominant eye after it has been corrected for distance to increase the range of clear vision. Thus, it allows for both near and intermediate vision, while preserving the quality of binocular distance vision.

    To be a good candidate for this corrective option, you must be willing to accept a slight difference in vision between both eyes.


    Works great or me!
     
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  5. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Agreed that distance correction only is better for most tennis players. The struck ball is almost always still in focus at arm + racquet's length. Having progressive or bifocal lenses more often results in areas out of focus as you look down at the bouncing ball, or digging out low volleys.
     
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  6. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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  7. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Yikes!

    Someone who isn't willing to take a flu vaccine isn't likely to wear contacts at night (infection risk!) to re-shape her corneas. :)

    In case anyone failed to notice . . .

    Getting old stinks. Really, it stinks.

    Cindy -- who burned some banana bread beyond recognition because she thought the digital readout on the oven said 325 when it really said 450
     
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  8. Ripper014

    Ripper014 Hall of Fame

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    Getting old does stink... the one thing I have noticed about tennis these days is that I have a lot more problems picking the serve up off the opponents racket. Well I better learn to enjoy what I have now... because I am going to guess it is not going to get any better.
     
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  9. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    ^Oh, yeah. It gets worse.

    I was doing a practice session with a friend. Both of us were at baseline. She tried to kill a ball and mishit it. I saw her swing but lost the ball completely. It was headed directly for my head. I saw it at the last second and ducked.

    I've reached the point where I'm a danger to myself and others.
     
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  10. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    maybe its time to wear a helmit and face mask on the court to protect yourself.lol
     
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  11. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    LOL! Yes, I agree about the flu shot. I haven't taken it for years. I did get the pneumonia shot though because they recommend it if you recognize Methusala as a blood relative. ;)

    Yes, once you get into bed things can get really exciting, so maybe you are right. I didn't think of that angle. ;)

    -Robert
     
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  12. Ken Honecker

    Ken Honecker Rookie

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    I wear progressive lens the last few years and haven't been able to blame my mishits on them. It must be my racquets fault. Either that or the other player is mishitting the ball to me.
     
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  13. Jagman

    Jagman Rookie

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    Getting old does stink. However, not that long ago, our quality of life and general health would likely have been much worse at this age (50+). At the very least, we are living longer and being presented with the opportunity to get more out of life than was afforded our ancestors. I am grateful for that, even as I grow frustrated with a a body that is finally showing the symptoms of much wear and abuse. :)

    I do have to wear glasses now to read. I will wear bifocals at times for driving (mostly at night or where I have to consult a map), walking around my office building (there are several access keypads where I may have to punch in codes), or for just working on things where I have to change my focus a lot (assembling something from instructions). Bifocals are difficult to use continuously because of the bifurcation in the lens and the sharp distinction in focus. Shifting from one focus to another takes time and IMO, they (bifocals) are not suited for activities, such as sports, which require quick reactions.

    Most people who need glasses for reading have better focus at arm's length and beyond. The contact point for a tennis ball is arm's length plus a little less than 27" (assuming you hit the sweetspot and not the tip of the frame). I wouldn't think that nearsightedness would present problems in playing tennis or seeing the ball.

    By any chance, Cindy, do you have high blood pressure? Medications and homeopathic remedies designed to treat hypertension generally do so by artificially lowering the blood pressure. Side effects of the medication include a tendency for lightheadedness, especially when getting up suddenly or making any sudden movement. I find that this can occasionally make me lose track of a ball. I find this especially annoying in doubles, as I would normally crouch very low at net and explode upwards to poach. I have had to adjust my stance appreciably. The good news is that dosage and medication can be fine-tuned a bit to downplay the severity of the effect. Just a thought.

    I'm already looking into a variation of wheelchair tennis that would be played using power chairs. In my early designs, I didn't give much thought to the safety factor. You've literally opened my eyes :shock:, and I'm now thinking about either having the players wear helmets with visors, or putting a windscreen on the Lil' Rascals.:twisted:

    Cheers!
     
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  14. jswinf

    jswinf Professional

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    The "delayed mishit" stroke sounds like a great idea.
     
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  15. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Nah, no high blood pressure, thankfully.

    And yeah, today's 50 is a lot healthier than a generation ago.

    Still, I never though it would happen to me. When you're young, it is really difficult to imagine some of the maladies that strike you decades later.
     
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  16. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Well as someone north of 45 I can say that since my left eye is frozen at infinity and my right is frozen at about 3 feet of focal length, my unaided tennis playing is as if I had the situation you describe and I play fine without any problems, vision-wise.
     
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  17. North

    North Professional

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    I wear bifocals (progressives) while playing. I can't get contact lenses due to too much astigmatism. It took a little while to adjust but now it is not a problem wearing glasses to play.
     
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