The word "Deuce" derives from French; so, why do the French prefer to say "Egalité"?

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by Ripper, Jun 8, 2006.

  1. Ripper

    Ripper Hall of Fame

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    From Wikipedia:

    "According to most tennis historians, modern tennis... borrowed both the name and much of the French vocabulary of royal tennis...

    Deuce comes from à deux le jeu, meaning "to both is the game" (that is, the two players have equal scores).
    "

    Edit: In case you don't know about Real Tennis ("Real" should be translated into "Royal", but isn't for some reason... maybe, since it existed before, they left it that way to make a statement):

    http://www.realtennisonline.com/rto
     
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  2. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    They want to be a more egalatarian country, to contrast with the US.
     
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  3. Ripper

    Ripper Hall of Fame

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    I forgot to say, this is not a "Let's bash the French" thread; I really want to know. However, if that's the answer, well, what can I say? Is it, is that the answer?

    Edit: Btw, this should have, probably, been posted somewhere else. KKPD ("Kaptain Karl Police Department"), please feel free to move... Not that you need my permission, I know.
     
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  4. exruda

    exruda Semi-Pro

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    I thought it came from an old english word that had had a meaning of "two" when playing cards or something
     
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  5. Ripper

    Ripper Hall of Fame

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    Really? If so, someone should consider editing this at Wikipedia?
     
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  6. exruda

    exruda Semi-Pro

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    perhaps, but I myself
    1. do not have "proof"
    2. am an anti-Wikipedist :)
     
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  7. nickybol

    nickybol Semi-Pro

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    Egalité became very popular after the french revolution, together with fraternité and liberté
     
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  8. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    égalité Noun, feminine (a) equality (of chances, men), equability (of a climate), evenness (of a surface); (Math) identity

    French Sports Vocabulary - Vocabulaire de sports
    Tennis | Le Tennis

    tennis player joueur de tennis
    men's singles simple messieurs
    men's doubles double messieurs
    women's singles simple dames
    women's doubles double dames

    equipment matériel
    tennis ball balle de tennis
    court court
    net filet
    racket raquette

    to keep the score tenir le score
    advantage in avantage service
    advantage out avantage dehors
    call décision
    deuce égalité
    double fault double faute
    error, fault, out faute
    fifteen quinze
    fifteen all quinze-A
    forty quarante
    game jeu
    game point balle de jeu
    let filet, let
    love zéro
    match point balle de match
    on the line sur la ligne
    point point
    thirty trente
    tie-breaker jeu décisif

    choice of service, sides choix du service, côté
    second serve second service
    backhand revers
    forehand coup droit
    to hit frapper
    to serve servir
    serve service
    server serveur
    stroke coup
    volley volée
     
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  9. golden chicken

    golden chicken Rookie

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    I thought "deuce" referred to the fact that you had to win two points in a row to win. a two (2) in playing cards is "a deuce" so that makes sense.

    I thought egalite meant "equal" which represented the tie score at 40-40

    you could say 40-all instead of deuce and then egalite would make more sense.

    does anyone know if they say "igual" at the masters in Barcelona? what do they say in Rome?
     
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  10. Pomeranian

    Pomeranian Semi-Pro

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    I don't think there is a particular reason why. Maybe it's just outdated. We don't say "thus", we usually prefer to say "therefore". That's a bad example but you get the idea. Maybe during the time of kings, the upperclass would play tennis and use the word deuce. But after the revolution as nickybol said, it become popular to say "egalite".
     
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  11. diegaa

    diegaa Hall of Fame

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    Almost! First, the masters series is held in Madrid. But there r more than one "spanish speaking" tourney, so it isnt just there.
    Anyways, they say "cuarenta iguales" as in 40-all.
     
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  12. nickybol

    nickybol Semi-Pro

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    Barcelona is catalan-speaking, right?
     
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  13. AndrewD

    AndrewD Legend

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    Ripper,
    As you said, it is 'derived' from the French so, instead of using a derivative, (what the French would, no doubt, consider a bas-tar-disation of their language) they use a French word. Egalite is a much better choice as it means, among other things, that there is an equal chance for both.
     
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  14. dmastous

    dmastous Professional

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    That wasn't a bash the French comment, it was another cheap shot at he US.
     
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  15. Ripper

    Ripper Hall of Fame

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    This makes sense.
     
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