Thinking about Lasik

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by red rook, Sep 22, 2012.

  1. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    MisterP...i know you were asking someone else, and someone who had PRK. For me, I had some advanced kind of Lasik (can't remember what it was called) that was supposed to better address night vision, halos, etc.. I have not had an problem with those issues. Night vision is fine.

    I had the surgery in 2004. So now, 10 years later, I'm still good. My distance vision is fine. I'm looking out my window easily able to read the license plate numbers of cars maybe 40-50' away. At almost 53, I'm finding I need reading glasses more consistently when I'm reading printed material or material on my kindle, but still don't find the need for reading glasses when using the computer, reading email, writing this response, etc...
     
    #51
  2. MisterP

    MisterP Semi-Pro

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    I actually had the initial LASIK screening about 10 years ago, and almost went through with it. But, decided against it because I was worried about the risk, albeit small, of having problems with the flap. Plus, I'd known a couple of people who had so-so results.

    Since then, I've met other people like you who have had great results. So, I'm not really sure. I know that with LASIK there is a very short recovery time, as opposed to PRK which can last weeks. But, you don't have to worry about the flap coming dislodged if you get blasted in the face with a tennis ball!
     
    #52
  3. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Do you have any references on this?

    If it is an issue wear protective sports glasses.
     
    #53
  4. MisterP

    MisterP Semi-Pro

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    It wouldn't need to be a direct hit to the actual eye. Just enough G-forces to cause it to dislocate, as in a car accident with air bag deployment.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2843572/

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17124883

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMicm1204137

    http://jms.ndmctsgh.edu.tw/fdarticlee/old/2303165.pdf

    http://www.irjo.org/browse.php?a_code=A-10-11-90&slc_lang=en&sid=1&sw=Corticosteroids

    I could go on.
     
    #54
  5. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    I've whacked my head on a few things since the Lasik surgery. Most notably my head crashing into my dog's head when we're playing and rough housing. Big dog, very hard head. No issues. Haven't had direct contact to the eye, but I'm not worried about that as a meaningful risk. I've been playing tennis for 40 years and never once been hit directly in the eye. I'll take my chances.
     
    #55
  6. jhhachamp

    jhhachamp Hall of Fame

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    I had lasik surgery done about 3 years ago. For the first month after surgery, one of my eyes was very dry to the point where I could not see as well out of that eye. I was using the eye drops all the time and was pretty worried, but the issue went away after 1 month.

    The other issue I have had and has not completely gone away is night vision and halos. These problems seem to be going away as well, but much more slowly. I think it also has to do with me getting used to the problems as well and I just don't really notice them as much anymore. I still see halos around car headlights sometimes when driving at night, and I have some difficulty seeing the tennis ball when playing on a court at night without very bright lights. Courts with good lights are no problem though.

    Despite these problems, I am still glad that I had lasik surgery. I was also told that I was at a higher risk of having the halo problems due to having larger than average pupils but was still willing to do it.

    I suppose there is always a very rare possibility that the flap could be reopened later by a trauma to the eye, but I think such occurrences are very rare. I have also had plenty of pokes in the eye and such and would have to say that my eye feels like it is 100% the strength it was before the surgery. You probably have a much greater chance of being killed in a car accident than you do of having your flap dislocate when the airbag deploys. A few extremely rare occurrences can't dictate your decision making. Heck, you could probably have a flap of your eye open up even without having had lasik surgery in extreme cases.

    By the way, in Los Angeles, many of the best lasik surgeons actually charge the least money. I had consultations with many places charging as much as $6,000, but the best 2 that I found were in Koreatown. The places that charged more often had fancier offices, but often had much less experience doing lasik. I ended up paying $1,500 for a guy who has done 40,000+ lasik surgeries and is very well respected.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014
    #56
  7. red rook

    red rook Rookie

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    Nothing significant. Vision with contacts isn't perfect either (wasn't for me). At six months there were still diminishing halos, and at 1 year it was all but gone. Some very slight starbursts at night driving but none on the tennis courts. I have better vision after prk than before with contacts. Still have a little dry eye but not a big deal for me. The main thing is the being patient as your eyes heal, requires great patience and more than a sprinkle of optimism. Vision kept improving even after a year had gone by. I'm now at approximately 1.5 years and glad I did it. Tough to take the plunge though.
     
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  8. Raul_SJ

    Raul_SJ Professional

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    I have heard that if one is near-sighted but can read without glasses, he would then require glasses for reading after Lasik. True?

    Don't think the trade-off would be worth it...
     
    #58
  9. jhhachamp

    jhhachamp Hall of Fame

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    I don't think so. As far as I know Lasik has no effect on the need for reading glasses. It cannot fix the problem and it cannot cause the problem (unless the surgeon makes a major error during surgery). The need for reading glasses comes later in life weather or not you have had lasik/have good distance vision. I had lasik and do not require reading glasses.
     
    #59
  10. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    To focus at both infinity and at reading distance, 16", a single eye must 'accommodate', a way of focusing that changes the shape of the eye's internal lens. To accommodate, your internal lens has to change shape to provide extra diopters over its infinity focus diopters. Between 40-50 years of age the eye lens almost always gradually stiffen. The muscles that pull on it can no longer change its shape enough to get the required diopters to focus for reading at 16". Then reading glasses are required.

    Light enters the eye through the cornea and then passes through the eye's internal lens above. The cornea is also a lens but it does not change shape. Lasik corrects the cornea's outerside surface and does not work on the eye's internal lens.

    I know someone who had Lasik on one eye to correct for reading distance to about 16". He had the other eye corrected for infinity. No glasses for reading or distance.

    The brain learns to work much more with one eye or the other whichever has best focus. Research disadvantages...?. He has been very pleased. His tennis has been fine and he has a very strong forehand.

    After about 15-20 years of being pleased with his Lasik my friend is having an eye problem where he is seeing double. It is being corrected with glasses that have wedges or prisms.

    Cataracts involve the eye's internal lens. For cataract surgery the eye lens is removed and replaced by an artificial lens. Similar reading correction options can be done when cataracts are removed and replaced by various lens options. Research options including Crystal Lens which allows some focusing, even adequate to read.

    If you have cataracts learn about options.

    Google Images search: loss accommodation age
    https://www.google.com/search?site=...0.0....0...1ac.1.37.img..12.9.593.ZvyzgIRy9fw
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2014
    #60
  11. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    all I can tell you is my experience. I was profoundly near sighted, to the point where if I didn't put my glasses in their set spot when I went to bed, I would struggle to find them. And my vision was so poor that I needed to keep my glasses on when I read.

    After Lasik (in 2004 at the age of 43) I no longer needed regular glasses, and I could read just fine. Now at almost 53, I need reading glasses for some material. I'm more comfortable using reading glasses with my Kindle or a book, but I'm not using reading glasses now while I type this, or when I read emails and web pages.

    Hope that helps.
     
    #61

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