thinking of switching right to left handed (Everything)

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by cakewalk, Sep 23, 2004.

  1. ext2hander

    ext2hander Rookie

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    Cakewalk,

    Why not use both sides, with the dominant side used more frequently and the less dominant to return otherwise un-returnable shots? I'm naturally right-handed, and will continue to be. But in developing the Extended Two-Hand Backhand, using the left-hand to return shots to left, whether baseline, mid-court, or net now seems natural for top-spin returns with good pace and directon. Just takes practice and confidence in the stroke. In my case, when compared to the E2HBH, just drop the right-hand thumb & forefinger since the left hand is already at the racquet butt.

    Check my recent 30 second YouTube video clip hitting three left-hand forehands on the run: deep to fence, wide to left alley, short ball approach:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DZ-4likZis&feature=youtu.be

    I'm working on the left-hand serve (for fun), mirroring my right-hand serve. Everything in reverse. This is a long-term project, but its just starting to click with a bit of pronation and topspin -- but getting anything close to the "trophy position" is really hard!

    Let's see other's video clips of their trials and tribulations hitting off-handed. :shock:
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2013
    #51
  2. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Try working on a lefty throw. Starting from a trophy position, throw a ball upward at a 45 degree angle. Also try steep angle throws -- like 75 degrees or greater (this should help later with the racket head drop). If you have some old rackets, take them out to the park and try some left-handed throws at 45 and 75+ degrees.

    With the racket start from the trophy position and first try some hatchet (tomahawk) throws. The forearm is supinated in the trophy position so that you are throwing the racket on edge (like an axe). Are several of these add some pronation just prior to your release. You can also simulate spin serves by employing less pronation prior to the release and perform a brushing motion. This can be done for slice, topspin-slice and topspin serve motions.

    When you get back to the court, start your real lefty serves with the arm and the racket in the trophy position. Forget about the windup/prep for a while. Make sure that you are getting a decent racket head drop when starting from the trophy.
     
    #52
  3. ext2hander

    ext2hander Rookie

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    Thanks, sounds like a good training technique, to simply throw the ball at 45-75 degrees elevation starting from trophy position (or an old racquet on park grass). Sounds like a good training technique. I will try! My regular right-hand serve has a good pace and spin using a fairly low toss, so I simplified the down loop to stay higher to give more time to reach up toward the magical trophy position. Though I get a really deep racquet drop-behind-back, the racquet still does not reach trophy position heights. So maybe your suggestion will help retrain the brain! left or right! Thanks.
     
    #53
  4. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    I have a pretty severe case of golfer's elbow, which is preventing me from playing right handed for at least six months. I eat and write left handed, so I figure why not put the time to good use and have some fun trying to develop a lefty game.

    I've been at it for a month now, and much to my surprise it's coming along rather quickly. The serve is by far the hardest part, but still I'm at least getting them in the box now and occasionally with some pop, but not much placement yet and it doesn't feel as natural as the groundies do.

    It's encouraging to hear some of the stories and advice posted on this thread. I'm not sure if I will be as competetive on the left, but I do think I'm going to continue practicing it, if nothing else to get a decent serve on the ad court and to balance out the muscles, as tennis can cause a lot of problems due to to the muscle imbalance of doing everything on one side.

    I'm wondering how the OP is doing after all these years? Still playing lefty?
     
    #54
  5. Dimcorner

    Dimcorner Professional

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    I tried playing lefty badminton for kicks and HOLY MOLY do I feel like a waddling duck with 2 right feet! I can't swing 1/2 speed for an overhead with a badminton racquet and that weighs like 86g only!

    If I tried with tennis racquet i would probably either break my left shoulder or my right leg from getting smacked by the racquet!
     
    #55
  6. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Weekday 3.5 to low 4.0 group I play with don't even realize I play with my right or left hand, until we're sitting on the bench to rehash the set. They might say..."your serve isn't very strong today" after I play rightie for a set.
    In their defense, I can say my rightie forehand is my strongest and most consistent groudie, my volleys are very close to equal on either side, and I actually try harder when I play right handed.
     
    #56
  7. cjs

    cjs Semi-Pro

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    I am a lefty who can also hit overheads with the right hand. Being ambidextrous for this shot has its advantages because you are eliminating the most difficult shot in tennis (the backhand overhead/volley) and gifting yourself a free point. Also with most lobs you have enough time to change hands.
     
    #57
  8. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Hmm, possible good point.
    I can snap a high forehand volley even if the ball is behind me, so it's gotta be better than my lefty backhand overhead.
    Problem is, most times, I can move to hit a normal overhead even if the ball is well over my right side. Giving up body position is about a draw with having to switch to right, hit the overhead, then switch to lefty again. Of course, ending the point with the right hand putaway volley after my overhead would be sorta satisfying.
     
    #58

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