thumb resting on grip for SHB any thoughts

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by looseleftie, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. looseleftie

    looseleftie Rookie

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    Hi all,
    Was taught to keep my thumb flat on the racquet for single handed backhand, I am pretty happy with the shot, hit it pretty well, however have been reading a lot of posts and watching You Tube vids, and it appears that there is knowone else out there doing the same.

    I was a raw beginner many years ago having lessons (32yrs ago), and didn't know any different, so took it as gospel.. I have no complaints it is a consistant shot for me.. Just wondering is there anyone out there who does this, and how do they find using it, for high balls, and more so off centred hits??? I think I'm at stage where I wont change it, but love reading any others experience of it..Already changed to SW forehand recently, it is taking time to get that right..

    It gives me quite a closed racquet face, don't know what sort of grip I have, it's almost a reverse semi western froehand grip?!?!?

    Any thoughts appreciated.

    Cheers guys:)
     
    #1
  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Good way to learn a topspin grip.
    Don't need it after a month of hitting that way.
    If you don't drop it, possibly you lose power and flexibility of changing contact point later down thru your career.
    The spread thumb limits racket head speed.
    Shadow swing to see what I was getting at.
     
    #2
  3. S&V Specialist

    S&V Specialist Rookie

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    Putting you thumb flat on the grip severely limits maneuverability and free range of motion in the wrist which can very negatively affect all types of shots. In other words, there's a reason you don't see many people who gave been successful in tennis use that sort of grip.
     
    #3
  4. Greg G

    Greg G Professional

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    I used to do that when I was a junior. I felt it gave more stability, but over time I just grew out of it.
     
    #4
  5. Gyswandir

    Gyswandir Rookie

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    +1

    Same here. Like the previous poster said, it limits free movement of your wrist. So, it decreases your potential racket head speed. I think if you maintain a looser wrist and hit the stroke properly, it becomes a hindrance
     
    #5
  6. therecanbeonlyone

    therecanbeonlyone New User

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    I use that grip and have since changing to a one-hander 20 years ago. I've wandered about tucking that thumb back in, but am comfortable the way it is. I haven't noticed any lack of maneuverability or racquet head speed.
     
    #6
  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    So, poster #6, how good are you with that thumb out 1hbh?
     
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  8. therecanbeonlyone

    therecanbeonlyone New User

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    I am very capable. Like you, I'm a lefty so I guess we are going to be different from most (having faced cross court righty forehands our whole life). Unlike you, I am tall, so it is easier for me to get on top of a ball if I need do. I slice a lot, which was a survival mechanism playing junior tourneys with a new one hander. Now that slice is a weapon though. I also rally with topspin and drive passing shots.

    What would be the real benefit of tucking that thumb in? My grip just feels more stable with the thumb up.
     
    #8
  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Main benefit is to stop any chance of future thumb arthritis or injury.
    As someone before said, NO good players stick their thumb out to support the racket on 1hbh drives. There really IS a reason for that.
     
    #9
  10. tball

    tball Semi-Pro

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    I still use it -- for blocking heavy serves to the backhand, or against someone who blasts very fast and heavy balls to my backhand. It provides very solid and predictable response. Far more solid and reliable under pressure than any other grips. Yes, it is limiting for generation of power, but in those circumstances, power is not needed: it has already been amply supplied by the opponent.

    The response, although very reliable, is also very predictable, so I do not keep it ON all the time. I vary it over the match -- sometimes I switch to slice, sometime I turn on full power/spin (means no thumb!).
     
    #10
  11. Attila_the_gorilla

    Attila_the_gorilla Professional

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    Like LeeD says, I think it's about avoiding injury. I often do it, instinctively, coming from a table tennis background, and I also paint, so it's a bit hard for me to lose some of these habits of using the smaller, finer joints/muscles in tennis. Need to keep in mind that a tennis racket is not a paint brush.
     
    #11
  12. looseleftie

    looseleftie Rookie

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    Cheers guys for your thoughts.. To be honest, I can't imagine ever changing and have never had any problems with soreness from thumb.. It seems like a good idea, planting that thumb up the handle, yes as LeeD said there are no pros doing it, but hey I'm no pro, and my backhand is pretty good..
     
    #12

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