tips vs years of training

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Pet, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. Pet

    Pet Semi-Pro

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    Yes, too many times I have worked in finding tennis tips here and there, or simply i can imagine it, can be successful to me game. Many of them works only for one day, one week,...

    I think that the important factor to be a good player are the total amount of training and not the surreal holy grail advise or tips.
     
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  2. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Legend

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    there are Players who Play 25 years and still suck (of course they did not Play every day but if you add all the hours...).

    there are several things that Count:

    -amount of practice
    -Quality of practice (and instruction)
    -Motor Talent
    -athleticsm
    -Motivation (if you really concentrate the instruction will Change more)
    ...
     
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  3. luvforty

    luvforty Banned

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    short of paying a coach to constantly correct your game.... you need to understand your own.

    tips are only good to the extent you understand it.
     
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  4. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    ^^ Yes, quality practice.

    Tips are well and good, but you gotta practice. Once it's muscle memory, you're gold.
     
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  5. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Hours of practice, not hours of playing matches.

    Playing matches may get you better at the strategic and mental part of the game, but as far as the ability to play good tennis, practice is necessary.

    Most of the lifetime 3.0 and 3.5 people don't actually work on improving their game on the backboard, ball machine, or with specific practice drills.
     
    #5
  6. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    You need a proper combination of both.

    Practice but no matches: you will become the club Federer with elegant style but will lose to a pusher in a real match and come crying here.

    Matches, but no practice: you will learn how to win, but your level will remain the same forever.

    Latter is advised for old farts who know they will never improve. Winning matches is good for their ego.

    Former is advised for those who want to look good but shy away from playing matches with some excuse or the other.
     
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  7. freelans

    freelans Rookie

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    Why not both?
     
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  8. martini1

    martini1 Hall of Fame

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    Obviously you need both. More practice is better AFTER you got the tip and understand what the point is.
     
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  9. HughJars

    HughJars Banned

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    I play with my mate twice a week. We have long 5 set games, and Id have to say the wins are well and truly in his favour. Hes a massive pusher, but starting to develop an attacking game. He also has a strong return of serve game. Basically he plays a war of attrition, waiting for the unforced error.

    The problem is, I ask him if he's keen to just have a hit around and work on some key errors, like second serves which Im struggling in, and his non existant one handed backhand. But he just wants to play games.

    I feel its kind of becoming detrimental to both of our development. While we're both making some good improvements, bad habits and recurring mistakes frequently pop up.

    I just want to practice!!!! But dont want to lose my hitting partner...I dont really know anyone else who would want a hit very often. My goal is to start playing pennants tennis soon but there is only so much a wall or an empty court can give help me with some areas of my game!
     
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  10. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    6 suggestions:

    1. Warm up longer before play. Say you are not happy starting yet without more backhand/volley/serve/overhead practice. Getting even 5 more minutes practice in each of these areas before starting play may make your subsequent match play more productive.

    2. Stay for 15 minutes after a match to hit backhand/volleyoverheads/returns. (You can practice your own serve on your own.)

    3. Come at least one other day after work to practice serves. "You are only as good as your second serve."

    4. You have got to be clever enough to find someone else who just wants to hit.
    If you haven't found that person yet, hit off the wall and see if there is someone else who shows up without a partner, get in a hitting session on the court, and if the two of you are of similar level, set up another night/day of practice.
    Also note that some who come down "just to serve" are like you and would also like to get some hitting in, in addition to serving. Ask.

    5. Make better use of the wall: Practise Wall Training http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNiXrgAtjxc

    6. Is there a ball machine you can use? Ball machines will let you practice placement - can't do that nearly as well on the wall.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
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  11. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    "You need a proper combination of both."
     
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  12. Mick3391

    Mick3391 Professional

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    Practice makes perfect, but imperfect practice makes for poor playing.

    I'm a bit biased as I'm self trained, but I think tips, advise is huge, don't discount it. I think you have to take the totality of advice then take what makes sense for you.

    I'm reading a book for review for my son, it's awesome, 50 mental techniques, and one thing stands out, we must make tennis OUR GAME, not someone else's.

    An example is a baseliner giving advice to a all court player or vice versa, it's not going to jive.
     
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  13. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    SURESH NAILED IT !!!!!:):)
    I lie with the all sets, no practice school. I can't be bothered to try to get good at tennis, especially since I can't run, and most of my time goes to windsurfing anyways.
     
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  14. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    I'll go one step further than suresh on the need to blend playing and practice.

    Every time you play, any good opponent will identify your most glaring weaknesses, and try to take advantage of them.

    There is constant reinforcement about the necessity on working on any weakness.
     
    #14
  15. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    If you want to work on your second serve, then just hit nothing but second serves the next time you play your buddy. If you want him to fix his backhand, then hit everything to the backhand and rush the net (eventually, he'll be forced to recognize his weakness).

    Just because you're playing sets, it doesn't mean you can't work on stuff. You just have to focus on the things you want to work on and ignore the score.
     
    #15
  16. Mongolmike

    Mongolmike Professional

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    And I'm gonna add that drill classes (a group of 6 or more people with a club pro feeding balls and orchestrating a variety of hitting drills) is NOT the same as practice.

    Often in a drill class you will get occasional simple comments from the pro, but no focused direction. I would suggest that you take the money from attending 2-3 drill classes and instead pay for a one-on-one 1 hour lesson with the pro.

    Focus on one or two weaknesses, or enhance one or two strengths... but you will learn more in a true lesson than you would in any number of drill classes.

    Sure, the drill classes are fun, and there is a social aspect too... but if you really want to improve... drill classes are not the way to go.

    That, and as others have said, get a ball machine or find a good wall... and at the minimum- take a bucket of balls to the court and work on your serve.
     
    #16
  17. safc_number10

    safc_number10 New User

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    Thanks for that. I was actually going to post asking if anyone justs hits against a wall, and whether you could anything out of a 'session' like that. Think I'll give it a go.
     
    #17
  18. safc_number10

    safc_number10 New User

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    This is a good description of group coaching as I call it. I do have one to one coaching - which are best as you say - but do find the group sessions useful as I get to hit a lot of balls and work on a lot of areas in the game.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2013
    #18

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