to much head light??

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by Bobs tennis, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. Bobs tennis

    Bobs tennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    193
    Can you guys help me with a question.Purchased a racket that was 10.1 oz and 1 pt HL.Due to prior elbow and shoulder problems I added 1.1 oz under butt cap and 4.5 grams between 11&2&12.Weight now matches my old frame at 11.6 oz but is 15 points HL.Is this to much:???I wanted a HL racket and about 11.5 oz and the racket feels good but should I add more to head???I should mention my old frame is 11.6 and is 8 pts HL...
     
    #1
  2. pshulam

    pshulam Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,398
    Location:
    Minneapolis
    If you likes the feel, why would you want to change it?
     
    #2
  3. Bobs tennis

    Bobs tennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    193
    Good point but is the amount way over "advisable" limits.As an example,back in the day I played with a head heavy racket which felt good but destroyed my elbow.Having gone to Head light frames the elbow has recovered but do people play with rackets set up this far...
     
    #3
  4. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,110
    Some frames are 10-12pts headlight (but also tend to be 12+ oz in weight). If 15pts works for you, go ahead. Personally I think it's a bit much, but I tend to like a closer to even HL balance.

    Do a playtest with it and see.
     
    #4
  5. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    7,276
    There really are no "advisable" limits. You have to play what feels right to you. There may be characteristics that may improve by changing the balance (adding more to the head, even removing some from the handle), but usually, each gain is accompanied by a loss of some other characteristic. Experiment. Find out what suits you best.
     
    #5
  6. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,592
    Location:
    Baseline
    Go with what feels right for you.

    In my own experiments I found that at some point lots of weight in the grip doesn't add anything to the hitting experience and only adds weight that still needs to be heaved around.

    Don't focus on balance is my primary advice. Focus on swingweight and static weight which will usually suggest a balance that works for you.

    In other words, the right balance should be viewed as a product of a sw and static weight combo in most instances.

    For example, I've found that certain swingweights provide me with a good feeling of stability and plow and certain static weights are just enough for me to absorb heavy incoming shots without being too heavy for me under pressure. Combined this sw and static weight usually results in a given balance. No matter how many times I tweak a frame, regardless of manufacturer or specific frame, I keep coming back to the specs in my signature with only minor differences.
     
    #6
  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    36,414
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    The ONLY thing that is important is how well you hit the ball.
    If the head is heaviest enough to hit hard, and you can swing it for 2 hours, it's fine.
    If you shots often go weak and short, it's too head light.
    How good is your first flat serve? That sorta determines rackethead weight.
     
    #7
  8. Sreeram

    Sreeram Professional

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2010
    Messages:
    808
    I do not like the tweener balance which is close to even. I now play with Donnay Proone and it felt great with nice HL balance after putting a leather grip. It is personal preference. For me weight at the grip makes me feel that the racquet is stable and will not twist in my hand.

    Your HL balance is perfectly if you find it stable. Personally i will find it too wippy with my BH. as my BH is more a punch rather than a big swing.
     
    #8
  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    36,414
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    I wonder if another way to skin a cat is to increase grip size, so you have more leverage over the twisting of the grip caused by mishits, due to more surface area.
    That would support my theory that volleyers like a bigger grip, while baseliners prefer a smaller grip.
     
    #9
  10. Bobs tennis

    Bobs tennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    193
    Today I brought my old frame and the new one and I could feel the difference in the very HL frame.I kept changing back and forth and although I felt the difference it wasn't a bad feel.Both frames are about 11.5/6 which I feel I need for my shoulder and elbow.I did have problems with a 10 ounce frame and will never go back.As far as my serve, the more HL frame actually served better.I seemed to move it thru the stroke better. I'll follow the advice and play it and go from there.I was able to make a small change and keep the same weight but get it to 12 pts HL.Thanks everyone for the help:-?
     
    #10

Share This Page