Top 10 Ranked NAIA standard of college tennis

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by danielpreston, Oct 25, 2007.

  1. danielpreston

    danielpreston New User

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    Just begun to look at NAIA colleges. Got a couple of interested colleges enquiring.

    Up to this point in time, I've limited my looking to NCAA.

    How do you guys rate top 10 NAIA? Are they comparable to any top 40 ranked D2 college. Better or worse?

    Interested in your opinions. I'm a 5.0 player.
     
    #1
  2. danielpreston

    danielpreston New User

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    Hey guys!

    Just come across a great post called NAIA tennis started back in July before I joined these forums. Have got all my answers. So no need to reply.
     
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  3. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Googled NAIA - looks like most NAIA schools are comparable with Div. II or Div. III colleges. Looks like NAIA might be the way to go if you would end up at an NCAA divsion III school since NAIA allows scholarships at the level and NCAA does not(at Div III). Also looks like the NCAA has a lot more regs and restrictions.

    To be honest, I've never even heard of the NAIA before your post. The NCAA gets alot more national attention and recognition.

    Here's good info on NAIA and the NCAA on the USTA web site:

    USTA Guide to College Tennis:
    http://dps.usta.com/usta_master/usta/doc/content/doc_437_452.PDF?12/8/2006 4:03:08 PM

    http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/content/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=336403&itype=7412

    Other Info:

    http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/content/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=335870&itype=7412

    "When looking at the different divisions, remember that just because a school is Division I doesn’t always mean it is the strongest when it comes to level of play. There are some Division II and NAIA schools that are stronger than some Division I programs. Division I programs usually have larger athletic budgets and more national exposure, therefore attracting more attention to their programs.

    In general, if you are able to qualify for National level events then you most likely can compete at a top 60 Division I school. If you primarily play at the Sectional level you would probably play out of the top 60 in Division I or a top Division II. Division III, NAIA and NJCAA schools offer good programs so don’t count them out. "


    http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/content/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=335874&itype=7412
     
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  4. tandayu

    tandayu Professional

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    My friend Played NAIA 3-4 years ago in South Cal. college, he beat #1 Pepperdine player 7-6 in third set. It was a schrimage (result did not count), but good player can be everywhere...
     
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