Transferring to doubles play

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by domosborn, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. domosborn

    domosborn Rookie

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    I love playing tennis, esp singles, but i CANNOT get used to doubles, apart from drills like volleying and practice, what else can i do to improve my game, seeing as I play at a level where singles is minimal, I really want to improve my doubles game, should i keep one partner? it seems to me in doubles gamemanship is much more prevalent, whereas in singles its 1v1, and mind games, whilst they happen *(at least to me) are not as detrimental? How can i sort my head out? I should also point out my volley is my weakest shot, which is not ideal...
    Apologies for the rant-like post, but I really do hate it, and just NOT playing isnt an option...
     
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  2. ProgressoR

    ProgressoR Hall of Fame

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    I am also very much a single player and play the occasional dubs, i have never become a fan, because at the lower levels its all cross court boring rallies, with the net guys just standing at the net doing nothing. This is social mixed dubs.

    i also found it hard to be more aggressive as I like to be in singles, because you feel obligated to your partner so you dont want to miss so i ended up playing safe, didnt enjoy it.

    I like trying things on serve, and strategy and dubs never allowed me that.

    The ONLY thing i thank dubs for is spending time at the net, that has helped my net game, but not the transition game, in single i find the transition and first volley the hardest, and you dont do that much in dubs, you usually are already at the net.

    Sorry I am not more positive, hope you get something good out of it, others will have great advice. Also at my level I found partners had no idea of strategy for dubs.

    i played a ton of badminton dubs and essentially lots of it is similar, be attacking, push opponents around, move together in attack and defence. In dubs if your partner doesnt have clue of how to move as a pair, then you cannot move anywhere yourself without leaving the court open.
     
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  3. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Professional

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    My doubles game improved when I made the simple realization that doubles is not about hitting winners (nor is it about grinding out points). It's about hitting shots that force your opponents to hit weak and/or predictable shots so that your partner or you will have an easy putaway. Once I realized this, I went into each match thinking "How can I make these guys pop up sitters?"

    You have to be able to spot your opponents' weaknesses and hit the shots necessary to exploit them. For the most part, that means having a wide variety of serves and solid returns (just blocking it back usually isn't a good way to play; it's too easy for the net man to put away). Can you hit kick serves to the backhand? Can you hit slice serves to the body? Can you drive returns at the server's feet from both wings? If not, you need to work on those aspects of your game.

    You have to be agressive but smart, putting your opponents in a position where they have to hit difficult shots. You have to think about what you're doing with your serves, not just mindlessly hit the same spot over and over. If you do it right, you should end up with a lot of forced errors from your opponents or easy putaways from your partner and yourself.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
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  4. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    well dubs is the perfect place to practice your first volley and transition game.
    if you serve and volley you get a first volley every time you serve.
    you can try things on your serve to see what type of returns you get.

    if you return and come in you are transitioning to the net and will probably have a first volley to hit

    as you play with better players (as you get better) your partners will understand doubles strategy
    then you can use hand signals,I formation, austrlian etc.
    it gets to be real fun:)
     
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  5. domosborn

    domosborn Rookie

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    Haha, its a real shame that doubles is all focussed on my weakest parts of my game :p like tailor made nto for me, but I guess I have to persevere and maybe I will learn to love it... maybe...
    Perhaps will come with maturity (god im counting a lot on that :p)
     
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  6. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Legend

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    The chilenian team Massu/gonzalez won the 04 olympics with no. net game. the just both kept ripping 100 MPH FHs at their opponents:D.
     
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  7. ProgressoR

    ProgressoR Hall of Fame

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    yes this is right and I wish it was the case for me, but in my experience the people i play with would have heart attack if we were both at net. One back one at net come hell or high water.

    If i am serving or returning, that means my partner is at net and you can be sure he/she will stay there and never poach till the point is over.

    You are right with better players where you can do this it would be more fun.
     
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  8. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Professional

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    When you play with people like that, come into the net and then, when they look shocked, just say "well one of us had to step up and hit a volley."

    When I'm playing socially with people I know well, if I get my opponents to pop one up, I yell "smash it!" It's a light-hearted wind-up for my partner, but at the same time it tells him/her that it's ok to be agressive and come across to hit putaways. Even when they do give it a good whack, I still say "none of that tippy tappy stuff; let's see a real smash." It's just a way to make a joke and make a point at the same time.

    After playing with me for a while, people tend to be more agressive at net even with other partners.
     
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  9. North

    North Professional

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    It's not just the skills. I have very good volleys, placement, approach, etc - all the stuff you need to excel at doubles. I play singles almost exclusively (lots of S&V, coming to net) and opponents have mentioned that I must be an awesome doubles player. Not. I'm not terrible at doubles but I do not play at the level of my singles play by any stretch. If for some reason I could only play doubles the rest of my life, I might consider finding another sport.

    There is a sort of peer pressure or sports-related "political correctness" in attitudes toward team sports, which doubles essentially is. For some reason, people will think there is something wrong with you if you absolutely prefer individual sports because the majority of people like team sports. It's just a matter of personality as to what you prefer.

    If you are stuck having to play doubles, try to find a partner (you may have to try a lot of partners) who is content to let you be the dominant player so you can take 2/3 of the balls (or thereabouts). You want someone who can consistently set you up to be the shotmaker and not inhibit your willingness to take risks. Egos being what they are, it is admittedly very difficult to find someone like that who is fine with a very supporting role. The idea is to make the experience for you as close to singles as it can be with a second person on your side of the net.

    Good luck!
     
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  10. domosborn

    domosborn Rookie

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    I just wanna play every shot and its frustration too, I know i must be a NIGHTMARE to partner haha, just wish I had more opp. for singles, I MUCH prefer it...
     
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  11. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Professional

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    Have you ever thought that, if your partner is setting you up for shots, maybe he/she is the dominant player?

    Whenever I play doubles with a weaker partner, he/she usually ends up hitting more winners than I do. That's because I'm hitting serves and returns that make our opponents pop up easy sitters. But, does that mean I'm not the dominant player since I'm not the one hitting the final ball?

    The best doubles teams I've ever seen were the ones where both players could set up a point and both could put it away. In the pairs with a dominant player, he/she usually hit fewer winners than the other. His/her shots either caused forced errors or set the weaker partner up for a putaway.

    You want to put away points (i.e., you want a partner that will set you up), but do you ever work to set them up? Do you ever thank your partner when he/she sets you up with a putaway (even if you miss it) or puts your opponents on the back foot for you?

    It's not that other people don't like a dominant player. It's that they don't want to do all the work and have someone else take all the credit. They also don't want to lose because a "dominant" player constantly gets out of position and leaves huge holes because he/she wants to hit every shot rather than trusting someone else to do their job.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
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  12. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    well said
    my sentiments exactly
     
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  13. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    To my view you have three options:

    1- Improve your opportunities for playing singles

    2- Play doubles like a singles player (preferably with a partner who also is a singles player). This used to be a recipe for disaster, when playing against classic doubles players, but with the modern game many legitimately play this style: two back for all shots and hit passing winners and swinging volleys off of weak popups.

    3- Buckle down and actually learn to play classic doubles strategy. Despite your posts to the contrary you don't seem motivated in this area.
     
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  14. tennismonkey

    tennismonkey Semi-Pro

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    +1 spaceman. same thing when the server hits a great serve, i hit a weak return back and the net guy hits an easy volley winner. i don't say "great volley" -- i say "great serve".
     
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  15. jdubbs

    jdubbs Hall of Fame

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    I played 3 sets yesterday in sort of a round robin, lets get together for Wednesday sort of way.

    By the last set, I was so frustrated I just wanted to get the he.ll of the court and go home.

    I'm not a great player, but my partner, who actually seemed like he had some skills, missed so many easy shots that we were losing game after game after game.

    There's nothing worse than sitting there watching your partner try to poach and hit the ball in the bottom of the net on almost every point.

    It was serve, maybe hit the return in, and point over almost every point. Wow, that's fun!

    Finally, I got to play singles for 30 minutes and it was so much better.

    I can't get in any rhythm playing doubles. It blows, but I use it as an oppty to S&V and practice different serves.
     
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  16. North

    North Professional

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    True. That is why there is such a difference between singles and doubles, much more than just a different skill set. Temperament and personality are far more important, I think. Many people (the majority) like team sports. Some people just don't and prefer being on their own and that's OK. The good doubles play you describe is that of a well-meshed team at work and is great to watch when it is played well.

    My suggestion for the OP to find a way to make doubles tolerable is perhaps more whistling in the dark than anything else because, as you rightly point out, people generally don't want to do work others will get the glory for. I was lucky enough to find a partner (when I played in a company-sponsored doubles only league when asked at work) whose personality was comfortable letting me dominate, but I was very careful to not leave huge holes and simply leave my partner to clean up tactical messes on the court. As it worked out, I got to hit most of the finishing shots and we had a pretty good time playing together.

    Btw Spiff, I miss Calvin and Hobbes - especially the transmogrifier.
     
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  17. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    This is a really good observation because it's something that the pros can get away with while many of us "mere mortals" just can't duplicate it. Those killers can hit such nasty rips from the back court that even great players with phenomenal skill can't set up to drive a volley through them in response. That style of play forces defensive volleys that sit up short like a free lunch, but most recreational players just aren't that strong.

    I'll come back later and leave a nice big brain dump on some aspects of doubles, but I just caught this post from dominikk and wanted to throw my first penny into the fountain. There's soooooooo much going on in the realm of "good doubles" that I think it can make for very constructive conversation.

    News at eleven!...
     
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  18. Angle Queen

    Angle Queen Professional

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    +2 spaceman. Good points, all.

    And I'll add a few other non-strategy things that can help improve someone's doubles game.

    First, be the kind of person people want to play/partner with. Keep loud egos and emotions in check and freely pass out encouragement and deserved compliments. Make good line calls, be on-time and bring a fresh can of balls.

    Second, don't always wait for opportunities to come your way. Get on the phone, call some people. Send out some emails. Put together a doubles "date" of your own. Even if people can't make the day/time you've selected, they'll learn that you're interested in playing with them...and they'll be more inclined to call you next time they're looking for a partner or fourth.

    Third, play/partner with anyone and everyone. At least the first time. Unless there's such bad history that you can't stand the thought of spending any time on the same court with them. Remember, it's not a marriage proposal. It's just 1.5hr or 2hr of your time...trying to working on something you say you want to improve.

    Fourth, try to have fun! Social doubles can be as fun and competitive as league or more organized play.

    And finally, always look for a learning (or teaching) moment. If you find yourself stuck on a court with much weaker players, use it as an opportunity to fine tune some placement and pace adjustment skills of your own. If you're the weakest one on court, stow the pride and openly admire the skills on display. Ask them for advice (you'd be surprised how willingly it might be given).

    Good luck!
     
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  19. Off The Wall

    Off The Wall Semi-Pro

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    Good points AQ. Under just about any condition, you can find a way to have fun
     
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  20. domosborn

    domosborn Rookie

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    Wow thanks for all the tips everyone! Just hope i can put some into practice :p
     
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  21. Tennis_Monk

    Tennis_Monk Hall of Fame

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    I tried playing doubles...didnt work for me. Despite leading singles player for my teams , i suck at doubles.
    People advised me several times about how i can be part of a potent doubles team with my skills.
    Bottom line is , i dont like doubles. In singles, i know where to hit the ball, in doubles i dont. My mind just cant process too many variables.

    These days my doubles are limited to exhibition matches/social events.
     
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  22. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    I went from 1 singles to 1 doubles this season, in 3 matches this is what i have seemed to notice.
    big serve up the middle is golden. lefty serve to the ad side= easy put away for the net man(happened to me twice so far). talk with your partner. when you are at net watch the opponents return idiosyncrasies(yesterday my partner was serving for the match and i saw the returner turn his racket to slice CC, i met the ball and poached it for the winner). always be on your toes., and always think that the ball is going to you,
     
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  23. larry10s

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    think how many singles matches you have had vs doubles

    more practice ,better results
     
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  24. Ajtat411

    Ajtat411 Semi-Pro

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    Best way to improve your doubles game is just play more doubles matches. You will slowly begin to see a pattern of how points develop and you can almost predict where balls will go.

    Good doubles drills are:

    -Cross court forehand/backhand hitting, focus on keeping balls low and out of the middle portion of the net.

    -Cross court volley drills with each person at the service box going cross court. Keep rallies going at first, then try to finish off the rallies as if in a game situation. If you have 3 or 4 guys, have everyone at the service boxes and rally one ball every which way.

    -Practice serve/volley. Focus on serve placement and spin serves. The faster the ball gets to your opponnet, the less time you will have to get to the net. Sometimes you want a slower spinny serve, unless you have a fast serve that is difficult to return anyway. A good first volley is vital to starting off the point with an advantage. If the first volley is weak, you're vunerable to the pass and easy lob.

    -Practice overheads. If you are pressing the net like you should be, the opponnet will eventually have to lob you. If you're ready for the lobs, like every good doubles team should be, you can put away overheads for easy points. Practice court position and quick shoulder/leg turn to get to lobs.

    General doubles observations that I have noticed:

    -Be as aggressive as you can be at net. Make your opponnets fear you at net and make them hit away from the middle of the court. This increases the difficulty of their shot, puts the percentages in your favor and puts tremendous pressure on the other team.

    -Communicate with your partner regarding serves/returns and general strategy before every point.

    -Keep your shots as low as possible to the net. Floater=putaways.

    -If opponnets approach net, hit ball at their feet or right/left hips and look for a pop up/floater to putaway.

    -A well executed lob is devasting. Practice the lob and it will get you out of many jams.

    -Sometimes it is better to hit the ball soft and low for control versus hard and high without control.

    -Be patient and let the point develop. Don't lung and reach for balls that are your partners. Take care of your own half of the court and be ready for any ball to come your way.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2011
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  25. Tennis_Monk

    Tennis_Monk Hall of Fame

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    I dont disagree.You are right.

    For me, There is an interest aspect to it too. I just dont find doubles interesting. Not just my game, even when pros play, i dont find doubles to be interesting or something that i need to put my time on.

    Mixed doubles....i can see something little bit interesting but beyond that...yawn.
     
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  26. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    is that the partner??:shock::oops:
     
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  27. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Agree with Spaceman Spiff.

    I'm reaching a point in doubles where I just cannot abide a partner who will not hit quality shots at least 90% of the time when I work to get the opponent to pop the ball up to them. They don't necessarily have to hit a winner. They do have to hit a quality shot that gets us in a better position in the point.

    I can tolerate many other deficiencies in partners -- I'm no Sharapova my own self. But my partners cannot keep booting easy volleys and overheads.
     
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  28. domosborn

    domosborn Rookie

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    Im not the calmest player, and In singles, if i play a shot i dont feel good enough (even if i win the point) it winds me up, more than anythign else, and with doubles, if my opponent plays the shots, n messes it up (less often than me but yeah) I will try n compensate by hitting bigger- more unforced errors - vicious cycle.
    Least with singles its completely up to me, I dont have the right mindet i dont think
     
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  29. Jack Romeo

    Jack Romeo Professional

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    hello. it seems to me like the op has more than just technical weaknesses that prevent him/her from playing good doubles. since doubles involves more than just you on the tennis court, you need some social skills to succeed in it. maybe this can help:

    start by playing only with your closest friends - be fair to each other and help each other learn and improve. this takes some of the pressure off and relaxes you. let your true personality be what it is on the court. if you are conscious about anything, it might affect your game and make you hold back on your shots, or make you try to showboat and go for too much. at least with your friends, they already know you and you already know them so you can just be yourself and play your own game.

    then you can move on to playing against other teams that aren't necessarily your close friends, but only partnering with someone who is your friend. (does that make sense?) don't be too competitive, just treat it as a social event (you know, just socializing and stuff...) again, focus on what you can learn from the experience - teamwork, communication, using your strengths and minimizing weaknesses while trying to compliment your partner's own strengths and weaknesses.

    all the while, learn from each match what needs to be improved - volleys, overheads, returns of different kinds of serves, lobs, passing shots, dipping shots, angles, etc. you will also learn where you are comfortable on court - like if you prefer receiving from either ad or deuce court.

    when you feel like you have improved technically and mentally to a point where no one intimidates you anymore, you can start playing with anyone; even if you don't know them. but make sure that everyone is of a similar level of skill because you won't probably enjoy yourself too much if you are a 4.5 playing with 3 3.0's or vice versa.

    when playing with someone you don't know well, talk to him or her in the warm up. socialize. ask which half of the court they want to return. before the match, talk again about what you think the two of you can do to beat the other team. tell each other your strengths and weaknesses.

    while you are improving technically, you are also improving your attitude and mental game. i believe doubles can help you with this. you will find that you will become less and less self-conscious, impatient, irritable and petulant; and become more and more sporting, sociable, patient, calm and competitive.

    i say all of this from experience. i used to be like you - i hated doubles and was too self conscious of my shots, impatient, easily irritated by my own and my partner's errors. there were matches that i quit just because i found that my opponents hit shots that i absolutely hated. after playing, i didn't socialize at all and just kept to myself or to my small group of close friends.

    i learned to love all the other aspects of the game because of playing doubles.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2011
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  30. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Maybe you've got a humanitarian streak and don't want to inflict your insecurities on an unsuspecting doubles partner? HA!!!

    In terms of the mental/emotional realm, your mindset needs help, even for your singles pursuits. If you're getting wound up over bad shots and spiraling off into a vicious cycle on a regular basis, you need to confront your expectations. Write them down if you can and think about what you expect of yourself when you play compared with the reality of you abilities. This is the one most significant hurdle for most players to overcome on their road to higher development.

    Get comfortable with the notion that you're going to miss. Oh yeah! You're gonna hit some stinkers in future matches and sometimes they'll come in bunches. Expect this. It happens. No biggie.

    The problems come when you decide to be a drama "(whatever term you prefer)" and hate yourself for hitting a bad shot. That's when you've decided to focus on your mistakes and that's when you're likely to repeat those mistakes instead of striving to tap your good habits. We don't just default to that better level of play. It takes work, including some effort "between the ears". Think it over and take charge out there.

    As for doubles, you've got to work on the essentials. Can't use what you don't have, right. Find a kindred spirit and get cracking on your volleys and approach shots. Doubles demands the patience to keep the ball low to your opponents until they cough up a high shot that you can drive down through their feet or off into daylight. Spin and kick serves afford you more time to move forward before hitting your second shot, so they need practice, too.

    Even when you're not hitting the ball, proper positioning with a partner will deny opponents some options or a general advantage. Experience will get you comfortable with moving together with any partner, both laterally and often at the same depth in the court, either at net or the back court.
     
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  31. domosborn

    domosborn Rookie

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    I think you may have summed up my entire game in around 300 words :p
     
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  32. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    I love doubles, I find it much more enjoyable then singles actually. If you have the ability to, I would recommend getting a partner that you can play with a lot. It really helps developing strategies and game play, if you know who you are playing with well, and understand their strengths and weaknesses, as well as your own. :)

    Also, if your going to succeed in doubles, you'll want to work on your hands and touch at the net! If you control the net, you control the game in mid to low level doubles especially!

    -Fuji
     
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  33. jpr

    jpr New User

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    my $0.02 as a former singles player who made the transition to doubles

    1) shotmaking is still important, however a good singles shot doesnt make a good doubles shot. bottomline: try to make your opponents hit low percentage or defensive shots

    2) return of serve is more important in doubles. seems like you can get away with floaters or defensive returns in singles more than doubles

    3) big serve is nice in doubles, but a well placed kicker leads to more easy put-aways

    4) dubs is a team sport. you're primary responsibility is to help your partner through his/her mental roller coaster. this takes some skill. people respond to different things...some like encouragement, some strategy, some joking. you have to find what your partner responds to. in majority of cases, rolling your eyes, being defensive, or counting errors doesnt help your cause.

    notice i didnt say anything about taking the net :) i've won matches from the baseline (1 up, 1 back), and i've lost to teams who stayed back. it depends on the circumstances and matchup; however i do believe all else equal, the team who takes the net has easier/better chance to put it away.

    single technical area that was hardest for me was the transition volley (ie 1st volley when you are serving). as you play better players, you will be forced to volley from your shoe-tops with an aggressive net-player on the other side. this was most difficult area for me to learn. i thought i had to hit a fabulous shot...learned i had to keep the point alive...neutralize a quality return and keep playing. doesnt mean i make them all, just enough to hold serve consistently.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2011
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  34. fruitytennis1

    fruitytennis1 Professional

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    Flawless explination
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2011
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  35. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Oh, cool. You know, having spent a few years coaching some kids' teams, it made me appreciate how much guidance I needed when I was trying to learn to play competitively in my school days (daze?). Half the battle can often be just getting a young slugger's head out of the way of his/her game.

    While I know that it can be sort of a big deal to add the task of reading a book to your daily grind, I had a really great experience with Vic Braden's work, Mental Tennis. He's a long-time tennis guru and also a licensed psychologist, so his insight toward the way our heads relate to tennis issues is fantastic. He's also a really funny dude, so his writing style makes for something to look forward to (I've read this book more than once). For me, this material was chock full 'o revelations and I recommend it to folks in the tennis world all the time.

    If you can't get into extra reading right now, just think over what you're doing when you're out there. The raging bull b.s. won't help your progress. Understand this and learn to resist going down that road in the future. Hey, if nothing else, at least insist on having a good time on the courts. We don't suffer the game or endure it... we play the game. Carry on.
     
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  36. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    A shame? or a real chance to work on those areas?
    It is a super game and full of awesome tactics to master!
     
    #36
  37. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Professional

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    You should do this when you're serving as well. It helps you find your opponents' weaknesses so you can exploit them.

    If both partners do this at the same time, they should be able to win more easy points on serve. The server hits a serve he knows the opponent will struggle with, and the net man will know what kind of return the opponent usually hits on such serves.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
    #37
  38. Carolina Racquet

    Carolina Racquet Hall of Fame

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    It's interesting reading the comments about "why I can't play/hate to play" doubles.

    I believe it helps to improve your singles play regardless of your playing style. Plus, the aspect of having a partner who is off his game or floating sitters coming back at you is another mental aspect to the game that tests you to stay focused.

    In my opinion, learn how to play doubles, deepen your tennis skills and grow your game.

    As a side note, I think this also holds true for doubles players who won't play singles. Playing both makes you a better overall player.
     
    #38
  39. anchorage

    anchorage Rookie

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    I started playing a lot more doubles a couple of years ago after I injured my knee quite badly and wasn't as mobile. My friend and I, who reckoned we were pretty decent singles players, entered a club doubles tournament.

    We won the first two rounds & thought, this is going OK. We then came up against two guys who really knew how to play doubles. Their movement together was exceptional. When they were at the net, it was like a brick wall; the gaps that we saw against others just weren't there. Also, the way they covered each other when one was out of position, retrieved lobs, etc, etc, put them on a different level. Basically, they didn't overpower us, they simply outplayed us. We came off realising that we had a lot to learn about proper doubles.

    I improved two things by playing doubles; first, the return of serve. The other was the service return down the line from wide balls. This came about because when anybody served wide on either side, you could guarantee that the net guy wouldn't properly cover the tramlines giving you a reasonable shot at a pass. (Needless to say, the 'good team' mentioned above had it well covered, though.)
     
    #39
  40. robert_craig72

    robert_craig72 New User

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    I'm also having difficulties playing doubles. This is where I need to improve in tennis.
     
    #40
  41. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Wow, that was a "never say never" match if there ever was one. The Chilenians were down 2 sets to 1 and down 2-6 in the 4th set tiebreak and came back to win the set and the match (and the Gold). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6GglrLepOk

    I disagree that Massu/Gonzalez had 'no net game' however their strategy did look a bit unorthodox to me.
     
    #41
  42. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    This looks like a fun thread to rant about doubles!!! :)

    Personally, I have never seen or been in a great doubles game where people aren't competitive or a bit emotional. When people are level headed, polite to each other (I'm talking about recreational tennis), the match is usually stale, lopsided or has very little expectation.

    Unless you're professionals who've understood and fully accepted the partner you have, which we are not, you bound to run into this problem that is inherent in doubles. You don't know what to expect, because you don't know your partner well, and you're not sure where you need to place your competitiveness. If you put on too much, you tend to demand the same thing from partner, because everyone has a notion of fairness when it comes to work. If you don't, it's just contrary to the whole affair.
     
    #42
  43. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    While I wouldn't go as far as that, I do see your point. When playing singles I have a Borg-like demeanor since it gives nothing to the other player (why make their job easier?). But I will dial it back for doubles since I want to show a bit more emotion to increase my partner's emotional state.
     
    #43
  44. FriarTuck

    FriarTuck New User

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    I'm also primarily a singles player but I've been playing regular doubles with a group of seniors for a few months now. The things I've learned are that you can't try to hit winners in doubles like you do in singles and that the most important thing is keeping the ball in play. I hate lobbing returns but sometimes that's the smartest play if the serves are good and the net guy is active.

    Playing doubles has also really forced me to develop better placement on my shots and some kind of strategy. If you have good groundies you can overpower an inferior opponent with ball bashing. Not so much in doubles.

    Doubles is fun but I definitely prefer singles. My biggest gripe is that changeovers turn into 5 minute swap meets and the games seem to drag at times.
     
    #44

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