***trouble Picking Playing Style***

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by reesespiecestennis, Jan 31, 2009.

  1. reesespiecestennis

    reesespiecestennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2008
    Messages:
    396
    This is really bugging me because I want to go to the (next) level, but I really haven't figured myself out as a tennis player yet. I don't know what style would be the most effective for my traits and physical abilties.

    I'm tall- 6'2 and I serve big and love to go to net. I also hit flat and hard which can be good sometimes.

    But I'm wondering if I should change to be a more topspin player, you know the guy who is ripping shots that clear the net by a big margin and the ball stays in. I'm just thinking this could help lower my errors and force more errors on the opponent.

    Because this is going to effect my racquet choice, etc.. Because I feel more comfortable with a light racquet becuase I can really whip it on serve, something I can't do with a heavier racquet, and I get a lot more juice out of it. And lighter racquets require a faster swing speed right?

    Thanks, yall.
     
    #1
  2. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    Do what you do best. Maximize your proficiencies and minimize your deficiencies. Bang the ball from the back court until you force a weak reply... then charge the net and finish the point. There you go now, an all court player... the best of both worlds.
     
    #2
  3. GeorgeLucas

    GeorgeLucas Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2006
    Messages:
    407
    That's right. Don't commit to one style saying "Yes. This is the kind of player I am, and I will practice ______ shots all the time". Be versatile.
     
    #3
  4. halalula1234

    halalula1234 Professional

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Messages:
    1,390
    Location:
    U.S
    yep i agree dont just stick to one thing practice everything and use it! depending on the situation that way u have all sourts of style and shots to back you up
     
    #4
  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    35,707
    Agree with everyone's answer.
    You play the way you play.
    If you like to dictate points, better hit flatter, harder, and faster.
    If you like to counterpunch and stay IN a point, maybe adopt more topspin.
    Remember with lower margin for error in flat shots, you gotta pay much more attention to posture of your upper body on all strokes.
     
    #5
  6. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    Double posting is fun! 2 + 2 = chicken!
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2009
    #6
  7. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    Aggresive all courter, definitely. at least based on the strengths you listed. Think Michael Llodra.
     
    #7
  8. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    35,707
    About the lighter weight racket thing...
    I think, and that's speaking only for me, that a HEAVIER racket provides more pace, spin, and produces a heavier ball on the serve.
    Now if your technique is good, that will be true.
    If your technique is suspect, then a lighter, possibly bigger racket will give you more service pace and spin.
    I'm 5'11" and maybe 145 lbs. mostly. I use a 95 sq in 12.4 oz racket for good tennis. If I want to mess around and look casual and lackadaisical, I can switch to 115 10.4 oz rackets that allow me to bang the ball a bit with little prep and effort.
    Now should I play GOOD tennis or lazy lackadaisical tennis?
     
    #8
  9. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    You're absolutely correct that a heavier racquet is usually better for serving, along with most other things, IMO. I'm still amazed at the stability of the Head Microgel Prestige Mid when it came to serving. That thing was a beast. It just plowed through every serve, whether I hit the sweet spot or not. :)
     
    #9
  10. Tempest344

    Tempest344 Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2007
    Messages:
    1,221
    Location:
    Sydney
    you sound like you play an agressive style
    just keep working on what you are doing
     
    #10
  11. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Messages:
    10,938
    Location:
    Stuck in the Matrix somewhere in Santa Clara CA
    How light are your talking about? If you hit fairly aggressively or play with people who hit fast or heavy, a racket that is too light may eventually result in shoulder or arm problems. This might take 9 months or even a few years to manifest itself tho'.

    You might want to try the SpeedPort Black or one of the other Prince Speedport racquets. The SP Black weighs in close to 11.5 oz (strung) with a SW of 327. However, due to the aerodynamics of the Speedport frame it swings like a much lighter racket --when needed, it seems than I can swing it as fast as an evenly-balanced racket that weighs under 10 oz.

    In fact, it swings so fast, I might be tempted to add weigh to the throat or the handle if I end up buy one in the near future.
     
    #11
  12. mawashi

    mawashi Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    4,228
    Location:
    S.E.A.
    I would say stick to something you're good at cus it will be your backup game when something goes wrong. You can modify your game to the point where you can spin well enough but to change your game completely to a spin master might be stretching it a bir far.

    I agree with SystemicAnomaly that too light a frame may cause problems later.

    You may want a frame to swing easy but really do you want to swing like a windmill for each n every shot?

    You might want to choose a frame that lets you rip shots, is heavy enough to handle a heavy return yet is able to give you a spinny ball that gives you a larger margin for error.

    If you can find a pro player that most plays like you then get a frame that best suits that game n physical built.

    I'm like Gilles Simon in height n weight and my style is rather similar to his so I'm using a 95 sq in frame, 325g, 16x19 for a bit more spin n a 63RA frame for comfort and better spin n control.

    mawashi
     
    #12
  13. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,364
    Sounds like you play an agressive game, that's good. Stick with it. Do what you do best and work on it.

    Having said that, don't be afraid to work on being more consistent, a high-heavy top spin ball is a great shot to have in your bag-o-tricks when you need it. You don't have to be a retriever type player to hit massive top spin from the back of the court. You also don't have to totally dump the hard flat shot to use this shot either.

    You can hit flat or top spin balls with a "heavy" or "light racket." I would say demo a buch of rackets and choose what feels good for you. If you're 6'2", you shouldn't have a problem with anything in the 10oz-12oz range.

    Also, a super heavy racket is not always better. Keep in mind that if you go with a lighter racket, you can always add weight, but if you go with a heavy racket, it's nearly impossible to remove weight without compromising the racket.
     
    #13
  14. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    Yeah, the O3 racquets do allow for some effortless swinging, for sure. Also, the Fischer M Pro and Magnetic tour are also great frames that really whip through the air with ease. I've never been happier with a frame than I am with my Fischers. It's a real shame that nobody gives these things a chance. All I hear about are Wilson, Head, Babolat, Prince, and MAYBE Dunlop on every other Tuesdays. :)
     
    #14
  15. reesespiecestennis

    reesespiecestennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2008
    Messages:
    396
    I'm really looking forward to hitting with the mpro 98. It's what I've been looking at. It might be to flexible but I'm gonna demo some this week since saturday should be in the 60's. YES!

    In light racquets I mean the pure drive weight tweeners are easier to swing on the serve. I have no problem on groundstrokes. Maybe it's my technique which makes it hard to use a heavier racquet, but I have great success with lower weights. I'm really gonna incorporate a lot of serve and volley this year because I can really cover the net with my height and I love to volley.

    The whole point of this thread is to see whether or not a pure drive racquet will work for me. I see so many good players at the college level with one. UVA's #1 uses a pdr and serves and volleys. My game is similar to his. Except no where near as big obviously. I just think my swing might be more suited since I use a kinda exagerrated swing, but my shots are flat.

    But it's funny because I love playing defense too. But I don't think I could really go far playing a defensive style because I'm not really fast.
     
    #15
  16. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,364
    PDR is sort of middle weight. IIRC - about 11.7 strung. I play with a PDR and love it. Great stick for servers, and you can always add weight if needed. I'd encourage a demo.

    If serve and volley is your meat and potatoes then go with a stick that will enhance that. May its not a PDR - maybe it is, but I would give that factor the largest consideration.

    Fishers are good too, just the flexy sticks aren't my style.
     
    #16
  17. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    Your serve and volley game just screams Fischer. And yes, I'm quite biased. :)
     
    #17
  18. orangettecoleman

    orangettecoleman Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,208
    Location:
    Mesa, AZ
    learn to hit all the shots decently and you will start to gravitate to whatever style fits you best.
     
    #18
  19. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW

    What level are you now? If more than 3.5 I would think twice before completely changing my strokes. Rather if you want to change your style (completely reasonable, perhaps even desirable) I would do it by tweeking the strokes you already have than by a complete reboot.
     
    #19
  20. Jim A

    Jim A Professional

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Messages:
    802
    doesn't hurt to have a variety of shots in the arsenal

    I like to hit flat as well, but sometimes that cuts down the amount of time to get towards the net and have worked on some shots with more spin and loft to change things up since pretty soon the people I play will have no issue with pace and may outhit me anyway
     
    #20
  21. OvertheFence

    OvertheFence Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2008
    Messages:
    159
    Like Bruce Lee said, the best fighter uses no style, and uses everything useful, and adapts to any style :p convert this to tennis talk xD
     
    #21
  22. reesespiecestennis

    reesespiecestennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2008
    Messages:
    396
    I was rated by a few pro's my freshman year as a high 3.5 or lower 4.0. I play in a bad area for tennis so my I couldn't practice as much as I would've liked last year because I had no one in my area to hit with besides my coach and a few other older folks so I pretty much can only hit by myself most of the time.

    This year I will be completely dedicated to my conditioning, and practice everyday. I'm thinking this year I'm not going to be as lazy and using a heavier racquet will really help me.

    If I could compare myself to a pro in terms of playing style I would say I'm similar to Murray and Djokovic (no where near as good obviously), but I like to go to net a little more.
     
    #22
  23. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW

    In that case you have a decision to make: am I young enough in my tennis career to decide to change my basic stroke and will I have enough practice time to groove the new stroke to where it is better than not only the stroke I have now, but what my current stroke would have been, if I would have given it the same attention?

    You know your situation best.

    Good luck.
     
    #23
  24. sonicboi21

    sonicboi21 Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2008
    Messages:
    364
    just play matches and dont change anything. see what you do during matchplay and that is what you are. no big deal
     
    #24

Share This Page