turning point in racquet technology??

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by dworkin, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. dworkin

    dworkin Guest

    It is beyond doubt that racquet technology has changed the game of tennis. This change has been gradual and probably cannot be defined by one moment in history.

    However, if you had to pinpoint a match or event that signalled the "watershed moment" or the "turning point" in tennis technology what would you say it was.

    Was it, for example, Jimmy Connors winning Wimbledon with his famous steel racquet? Was it this event that brought to light the importance of technology in the game or did that only become clear when graphite began to appear? Any thoughts?
     
    #1
  2. Ripper

    Ripper Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2005
    Messages:
    4,652
    Location:
    "Where Moth & Rust Destroy"
    Yeah, this thread would have been more appropriate in the Pro's Racquets & Gear forum, not here.

    Just joking... I read what Court Jester posted over there... and I agree :)
     
    #2
  3. Court_Jester

    Court_Jester Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    2,094
    LOL! Didn't mean to be rough and stern on you, dworkin but we already way too many posters, newbies and veterans alike, who put up threads on forums where they don't belong.

    Anyway, here's my 2 cents worth: I think the switch to graphite is the single most important development in racquet manufacturing. Lots of materials and composites have been tried but graphite proves to be the one with longevity. Many of the pure graphite racquets at the beginning have achieved legendary status and are most sought after by players and collectors.
     
    #3
  4. chiru

    chiru Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Messages:
    1,455
    i agree with the graphite change. i think most people went from wood to graphite strait up, ignoring metal. metal was cumbersome, very heavy, and i honestly feel like i play much better with a wood racket than with a t2000 or something. the metal probably suited connors well back then, but it was definately not for everyone. graphite was the big change i think in teh evolutio of racket technology, because every new advancement has been a variation on that. i'm waiting for diamond rackets next (another carbon allotrope)
     
    #4
  5. louis netman

    louis netman Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,386
    Location:
    SoCal
    I think Gamma had a Diamond Fiber something or other in their racket repertoire awhile back...;-)
     
    #5
  6. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    35,022
    wood
    metal
    graphite
    larger headsize
    strings
     
    #6
  7. rocket

    rocket Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 23, 2005
    Messages:
    1,538
    Babolat sticks & Big Banger strings.
     
    #7
  8. Onion

    Onion New User

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2005
    Messages:
    67
    Throw in the widebody somewhere in there. That wilson Profile was the first big widebody that I can remember. It set the tone for a whole bunch of racquet designs to come.
     
    #8
  9. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    35,022
    wood
    wood with lots of plys
    metal
    graphite
    larger headsize
    strings, specially polyesters like Luxilon
    widebody
    longbody
    higher stiffness (Babolat specially)
    graphite + some other material (tungsten, magnesium, hypercarbon, kevlar, texalum, titanium, DNX, Ncode etc) - same/lighter weight but more stability. The graphite + kevlar was probably the greatest achievement for a while.
    liquidmetal
    O ports (according to many users on this board)
    Flexpoint (according to some users on this board)
    Stability bar (POG)
    Aerodynamic beam (Babolat aeropro)
    Head's piezoelectric fibers
    Sand in the head (Prokennex) for dampening for arm problems

    Will there ever be any really revolutionary invention in the future?
     
    #9
  10. dmastous

    dmastous Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1,132
    The fiberglass, and carbon fibers were the turning point in racquet technology. Everything else pails compared to the ability to make racquets that were lighter AND with larger heads. Larger heads mean less torque or twisting on off center hits, larger sweetspot, more area to swing up on the ball with, longer strings for more power.
    This one change allowed players to take more risks with their swings, swing harder with more spin and more abandon. There is no way you would be able to hit like Federer or Agassi with a wood racquet. You would look bad trying.
     
    #10
  11. jonolau

    jonolau Legend

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2005
    Messages:
    5,090
    Location:
    Singapore
    I'm just wondering if Volkl's use of DNX will be the next turning point ...

    DNX is only applied to selected spots because of the cost, but once it becomes more commercialized and production costs drop, it could be applied to the rest of the frame.

    Just my thoughts.
     
    #11
  12. dmastous

    dmastous Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1,132
    Sounds very much like a combination of nano technology and high modulous graphite. One thing I've learn from studying racquet technologies is that there are new things and there are successful ideas, but all the companies copy each other and just call it something they invented. Prince has the triple threat tungston fibers (in seleted spots) Head uses Liquid Metal Wilson has Hyper Carbon.
     
    #12

Share This Page