Tweener VS player raquets for developing?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by Supermange, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Supermange

    Supermange Rookie

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    HI

    I'm your average player. Played intensly 2-3 times a week for a year.
    Don't know about ranking but guessing 4.0-4.5. (Don't know if this ranks talent or just skill level) I'm somewhere slightly above average, hopefully.
    But the racquets I'm choosing between is either a Wilson 6.1 95 BLX 18x20 or a Dunlop biometic 500 tour with some lead (337g), I own these 2.
    Or prince rebel 98 or Dunlop biometic 300 with some led. Demoed the 300 felt light.

    As the post said I'm afraid a tweener might hold me back and a player racquet like the 95 will help me develop. Is this just bs. Is it the other way around? I like the plow through with the 95 and I must be on my toes to play with it. And I have no problem. But it feels more fun with a tweener to be honest.
    So am i missing the big picture here?

    thankful for any replys.
     
    #1
  2. Hominator

    Hominator Hall of Fame

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    Have you only been playing a year and are a 4.0-4.5? That's impressive.

    I don't think a tweener would hold you back at all. Lots of D1 college players, let alone professional players, play with tweeners such as an Aero Pro Drive or Pure Drive. If it's more fun to play with a tweener, go for it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
    #2
  3. Supermange

    Supermange Rookie

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    Hi.
    No I've played for 2 years total. but only intensly a year.
    Yeah I agree with you but I'm not totaly convinced that it isn't better to play with a players racquet. That when you have to bring the power yourself you somehow gain something learningwise.
    But I could just be fooling myslef to think that the racquet makes the player.
    But if there is only advantages to play with a tweener why doesn't everybody? Sorry but this is the kind of thinking I have atm, heh.
     
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  4. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    #4
  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Difference is so little that at your level, it makes no difference.
    For a real good player, there are player preferences that come into play.
    Size is not the only issue, as balance, weight, SW, perceived swing ease, and looks make a big difference in determining which racket a player plays with.
    4-4.5 would be top singles for a high school, or better than any playground player in any playground anywhere. Around mid level junio college TEAM player.
     
    #5
  6. Supermange

    Supermange Rookie

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    I just guessed that I would be 4.0-4.5. probably more like 3.5-4.0 as I wrote average talent, but I enjoy playing. But i have correct swing which a pro 5.5+ pointed out. The point wasn't how good I am but if it's better to play with a players racquet when you are learning.

    Thanks muppet for that link. That's frigging perfext thx.
     
    #6
  7. Supermange

    Supermange Rookie

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    Im from sweden and we don't use that system. Just a subjective comparising to the playtester Jason at TW who is a 4.0.
     
    #7
  8. prjacobs

    prjacobs Professional

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    I started out with a total player's frame, in fact a tour level frame in terms of power and head side, but I'd had a lot of paddleball experience and was a varsity level baseball pitcher.And that was also a long time ago, when having a 12.9 ounce frame wasn't that unusual. However, it I were starting now, I'd go for something that would help my game a bit more. By the way, respectfully, it's extremely doubtful that you're a 4.5 or even a 4.0 player after two years, as Lee states above. I played with a dunlop 4D 500 tour for a year and a half. I loved the frame but it was too hard on my shoulder. I'd never developed shoulder issues before, so I scrapped it. I don't think you need to go as heavy as the BLX 6.1 95. Very few players are using frames that heavy anymore, although I almost bought the K6.1 95 when I decided on the dunlop. It was just a little to sluggish for me over a long match. I think something in the 11 - 11.5 range would offer you many options. You can always add weight. Anyway, good luck.
     
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  9. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    Glad I could help.
     
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  10. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    "tweeners" will give you more margin of error compared to a "players".
     
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  11. Backhanded Compliment

    Backhanded Compliment Hall of Fame

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    It really depends on your style of play. If intense topspin and finishing points quickly while still playing the baseline is your thing ... then a tweener isnt a bad idea. I used them when I was coming back to the game (Im a former 5.0 and will likely never be one again) but at a certain point I found that the tweeners were holding me back because my backhand has a really long full stroke. I had to throttle back on groundstrokes with a tweener (if you find yourself doing that THEN you might want to consider something more control oriented). Now Im often involved in 10-20 stroke rallies and get to the net a lot more so it made sense to try a more allcourt players control frame. It did help me really find my form again. A demanding fram edoes force you to fix things if you know how.

    So are you a baseliner or all court? how much topspin do you use? Sounds like you are a 3.5 to low 4.o and a fast learner... that's pretty good.

    Not knowing any of that Id say the Dunlop 300 tour is a pretty solid frame for most any style of play... it's rather neutral yet demanding enough to encourage better technique. Some tweeners can mask bad habits... a the six one will reveal shortcomings but its fine to use a racket like that on days you feel on. If you arent playing tourneys I see no reason to use only one frame... try a few and settle on something once you figure things out a bit more.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
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  12. ZeroSkid

    ZeroSkid Banned

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    short answer, use a tweener, a players frame will be too demanding for you
     
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  13. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    non of those racquets are tweeners and non of them will hold you back.
     
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  14. ArliHawk

    ArliHawk Hall of Fame

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    Tweener till you get to 4.5/5.0
     
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  15. Chyeaah

    Chyeaah Professional

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    I don't think many pros play with tweeners, their racquets are all leaded up and stuff to make it the weight of a players.
     
    #15
  16. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    The rackets you listed are very different. First decide if you like the thick or thin beam. More control and feel from the thin beam and more power from the thick beam. After that, pick any good racket in that category. For me, I like a thin beam with a decent swing weight. I play all court tennis and find the wider beam rackets don't volley as well and they sometimes have too much power on the baseline.

    It is up to you.

    Also, look at the pros. If you want to play like Nadal with a power spin game, maybe a wide beam. But, if you want to play like Federer or Fish with an all court game; maybe a thin beam.

    And, then there is the Wilson Pro Open. A wider beam with more flex than a lot of other "tweeners". To me, this is a split between the Aeropro, Dunlop 500 T type and the blx 95 type rackets.

    So, it is up to you. Try 'em and pick one.
     
    #16

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