Twisted My Ankle

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Roy125, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Roy125

    Roy125 Professional

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    So I twisted my ankle today while playing on semi-wet courts. The pain receded after 10 minutes and then I proceeded to play the best match I've ever played against my high school teammate. There's still a little pain to the ankle now but I have a match tomorrow. What should I do?
     
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  2. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    Honestly, unless you ABSOLUTELY, as in the team depends on you and you're able to walk without a significant limp, then you shouldn't play.

    Your ability to play as well as you didnt after you twisted the ankle, may have been caused by the released of adrenaline.

    We don't know how badly you've injured the ankle, only a doctor can, so go see one and go from there.

    I had a severe sprain in high school and that shut me down for at least a month. But I knew right there and then, because it immediately became a non-weight bearing leg.

    Common sense says to let it rest.
     
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  3. Blitzball

    Blitzball Semi-Pro

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    Well first off, you should think safety first, like what Say Chi Sin Lo was saying. However, it really depends on the severity of the injury. A twisted ankle usually, for me at least, hurts for a few minutes, and might leave it tender, but doesn't really hurt my performance or risk my safety. A sprained ankle is much more severe. If there is swelling and high tenderness in the ankle, don't play and let it rest. If there is minimal pain and very minimal swelling, you're probably good to play. Use your best judgement, and look to past experiences to help.
     
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  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Roy is a high schooler, I think.
    How much "past experience" can he have accumulated in his short life?
     
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  5. tennis-player

    tennis-player New User

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    I can not imagine playing after sprained ankle. After I sprained my ankle back in January, I was not able to step on that foot, let alone run. Either your sprain is very mild, or you feel no pain.
    In any case you should ice it and rest for couple days. Without proper care you can develop long term issues (a non-tennis-player friend ended up needing a surgery about 6 months after her ankle sprain - she felt she was too tough to rest and kept on going 100%) and you are just too young for that. :)
     
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  6. Roy125

    Roy125 Professional

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    I've had one other sprained ankle when I was in fourth grade, which hurted for at least a week. :(

    The ankle twist today looked something like this:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MrT5gM8BOQ
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Really, I commend you for asking. Lesser players would have just forged on by themselves.
    Experience....as a 63 year old, I know at least 50 people who've sprained ankles to the form of no play for at least a week.
    I myself have sprained maybe 10 times, the last big one 4 years ago still bothering me (I can't run), and the very last one 2 months ago on the other ankle (since I already can't run, well, what's the diff).
    That is a very small sample of experience. A doctor friend who works at HighlandE probably has seen over 400 sprained ankles, and many injuries much worse.
     
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  8. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Do you have a trainer or physical therapist that works with athletes at your school?

    Because tennis injuries are so uncommon compared to other sports, tennis players sometimes don't think to avail themselves of someone who can quickly examine them and recommend some treatment, and can perhaps even do some ankle taping.

    Just a word of warning however. Most trainers are great. Some however have a "warrior" mentality of getting the ankle taped and getting you back to play, even if it is a little "iffy" you really should. You may still have to make the call of whether to return sooner or later. (The only reason I am somewhat encouraged is that you state you have only a "little pain".)


    It is not that uncommon that after one ankle sprain the ligaments are "stretched" and you are prone to another sprain or two this tennis season. Some end up breaking this cycle with an ankle brace that provides more support until the sprain has totally healed. Certainly, if you are having prolonged ankle pain, or recurrent ankle pain, seeing a sports medicine specialist would be a good idea.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
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  9. Swissv2

    Swissv2 Hall of Fame

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    Best to save your ankle now - and not play - then continue to injure it, and regret it for the rest of your playing career.
     
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  10. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    I think there are two types of ankle sprains for me: twisted ankles, and a real ankle sprain.

    Twisted ankle: For me, these are the ones where you land on the ankle just slightly awkward. It kind of stings for a few minutes, limps for a couple steps, and you're still able to bare weight on the leg and change direction as effortlessly as before. In a nutshell, you can shake these off on the spot. You'll still feel some after-affect the morning after. You can use your judgement on these, most tennis players have played on a slightly twisted ankle at some point in their lives.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLIg6aRPZKo
    Skip to 1:45

    A sprained ankle: These are the ones that forces you to collapse onto the ground, as the shooting pain from the ankle overwhelm your body and mind. Seconds after the sprain, you're going to go fetal. You better hope there's someone there to help you off the ground, because there's no way you're getting up. Don't use your judgement on these. That leg will become a non-weight-bearing leg for the next few weeks.
     
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