UC San Diego

Discussion in 'College Tennis Talk' started by roddick_rulz, Mar 30, 2009.

  1. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Hey guys,
    I'm a 4.5 Junior interested in playing at UC San Diego Div II.
    What does it take to play here?
     
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  2. baseline08thrasher

    baseline08thrasher Semi-Pro

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    Well trusting the fact that you are really a 4.5.

    All that matters is how much work you are willing to do, tournaments, and how old you are.


    I think you have a good shot.

    I watched Stanford play USC on Saturday and it was amazing.
     
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  3. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Yes I actually am a 4.5, I'm not one of those people that boosts or anything.
    I want this to actually be beneficial to me.
    But thanks for the great news.
    What's the best way for me to get UC San Diego to notice me?
     
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  4. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    You will first have to be admitted to the school, not an easy task considering this is an academic powerhouse and not an athletic school. All things considered, the guys here are pretty good. A 4.5 player might make it if they are willing to work hard. I have watched a few matches and they are pretty competitive. Talk to Coach Eric if you're interested. He will probably fill you in on all the details. It's a beautiful campus but remember to come here for the education and not the athletics. There's no football team or really much school spirit. Unless you're a really strong player, I suggest you pick the school you want to go to and then decide to try out for a team.
    If you have any questions about UCSD, let me know. I went there.
     
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  5. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Yeah, this is a school that I really want to go to.
    There isn't much reason to go there if it weren't for the academics as I hear it's a great school.
    What are my chances of getting some sort of partial scholarship?
    (Take into account that I still have one more year to improve)
    I'm not so sure that I'd get admitted based on my academics alone so I was hoping for tennis to help me out.
     
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  6. Joeyg

    Joeyg Semi-Pro

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    Division II schools have 4 1/2 scholarships available for tennis. If you are a 4.5 player and want to attend UCSD, I would look to an academic scholarship rather than an athletic one.

    Unfortunately, you are probably not good enough to warrant any type of athletic aid. UCSD is a tough school to get into at best. Your best shot would be to try and get in and then walk on.
     
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  7. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Well I'm probably not intelligent enough to get an academic scholarship to that school, not to say that I'm dumb or anything just not as smart as many of the kids at that school. I know the school is very good academically and is why I'd like to go there.
    Would you suggest emailing the coach?
     
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  8. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    I think you also posted once about attending IMG. That should help your game out as well.
    As far as partial scholarships, I would again advise you to talk to Coach Eric Steidlmayer regarding your chances. Here's a link to his page with phone, email, etc: http://www.ucsdtritons.com/ViewArti...45&DB_OEM_ID=5800&ATCLID=186661&Q_SEASON=2008
    He would know the scholarship status of all the players. It's a pretty young team with lots of fr/so players. Scholarship opportunities might be slim. I think the biggest scholarship is something like $500/quarter so don't count on it funding your entire education.
    The problem with UCSD is that it is an NCAA div ii school which means you don't get a big break in admissions for being an athlete. The vast majority of what determines whether you get in or not will be the following: GPA and scores on SAT I/II. This will probably be 80% of the decision. At most, 10% of the decision will be things like athletics, family history, etc. Historical evidence shows that grades and test scores are more predictive of success than anything else so they tend to go with what works.

    NOTE: I speak with regards to UCSD only. I don't have experience with other schools.

    My advice to you is to study hard and get good grades. Play tennis too but be realistic about your future expections. Also consider that you have to maintain a certain GPA to say in school. More than 2 quarters of below 2.0 GPA will get you kicked out of school so it's important to maintain your study skills if you get in.
     
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  9. Joeyg

    Joeyg Semi-Pro

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    It never hurts to have a dialogue with a coach. I know, I am one. Sound him out and see what he says. After that, I would get a video of yourself playing in case he would like to see you in action.

    Good Luck.
     
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  10. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    Don't worry about getting an academic scholarship. I didn't have one. As long as you can get into the school, you're good.
    Remember, GPA and test scores factor in heavily for admissions. An SAT prep course could make the difference if you need help getting in. GPA is by far the biggest factor in determining admission. Trust me, I worked with someone on the admissions committee. This is what they do.
     
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  11. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    I agree with Joeyg. Talk to the coach. Get a dialog going. I don't think he can get you into the school, but he can give you pointers on making the team.
     
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  12. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    Also, take a look at the roster for UCSD men's tennis:

    http://www.ucsdtritons.com/SportSelect.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=5800&KEY=&SPID=2345&SPSID=29969

    Some of these guys are pretty good...top 50 in socal is nothing to sneeze at. There are a lot of competitive players here in san diego.

    If academics are concern, how about I throw this bone: you can use the jr. college transfer guarantee to your advantage. Go to a jc (which is far easier to get good grades than UCSD) and study hard. Get good grades there and transfer using the guarantee system. Save yourself 2 years of UCSD tuition and transfer in. Unfortunately, you'll lose 2 years but that's another option to consider.
     
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  13. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Thanks for all this info.
    Yes, I do train at IMG but fairly infrequently.
    I will definitely get in contact with coach and.I'll see what he says.
    What's the transfer gurantee?
     
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  14. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    I don't have the space to explain, but this link will give you a start:

    http://uctransfer.universityofcalifornia.edu/pdf/path_overview_final.pdf

    Basically, you complete the minimum requirements at a junior college and hold a minimum GPA (something like a 3.0) to guarantee yourself a space at any UC campus. You may not get the major you want but it depends mostly on space and demand.

    This is a good route if you mostly want to get into a school and don't necessarily want the 4 years of athletics experience. I know plenty of people who went this route and saved money by not paying $8000 a year the first two years (housing and food not included).
     
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  15. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    Oh yeah. This is assuming you live in California. Otherwise all bets are off.
     
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  16. BravoRed691

    BravoRed691 Semi-Pro

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    Hey! Im assuming "Get it In." Has some experience with the UC system! lol

    I also have some experience with it and the thing about UCSD is that it's a pretty good school and not all that easy to get into...although it is easier as a transfer! Each of the schools do hold a certain number of spots for transfers...there is no magic number and that number is kinda hush hush :)

    Get it in go it right when he said you have to meet a min GPA requirement. The thing is, that DOES NOT mean automatic admission to ANY UC u want. They will try and place you in the system, so you might get like UC merced or UC Riverside (assuming you applied to these school of course). The upper echelon of the UC schools are still looking to weed out the "average smart" students. Again, if you transfer it will be a bit easier cause you wont be competing directly with freshmen.

    As for tennis, Yea UCSD is a Div "powerhouse." And b/c they are a DII don't expect to pay your way thru school with it. Chances are you'll have to try and walk on was well. But more power to ya!

    When i applied to the UC system, we had the Freshman guarantee as well...but that, like the transfer guarantee applies to the system as a whole and not nec the specific school you want. There is still a difference between getting into Berkeley and into Merced.

    Br
     
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  17. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Ok well this news was both pleasing and not pleasing as the whole transfer guarantee sounded like such a great idea until I heard that you can't choose the specific UC u want to go to but it's still an option.
    On the other hand, I'm NOT from California as I'm from Canada and would not have heard this information from others so I thank you guys. But I heard from my cousin who does live in California that I could claim in-state residence...or something of that nature. So would the transfer guarantee still apply?
    And lastly, what's an example of a junior college as I'm not familiar with the whole system.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2009
    #17
  18. jaggy

    jaggy G.O.A.T.

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    If your GPA in a Cal community college is good enough (and this isnt that tough to do) you will get into UCSD but maybe not into the major you want. Choose a juco with a good tennis program, I am 10 years out of Cali but Grossmont in East San Diego County used to be strong and there are others. Talk to the juco advisors who know everything about transferring and will help you, jucos want you to get into good 4 year schools. And if you're not a Cal resident Id suggest you move there and after one year you will get residency as long as you are not in college for that year.
     
    #18
  19. jaggy

    jaggy G.O.A.T.

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    I just read your last message, google California community colleges for options but basically you do your first 2 years at the juco then transfer. Your diploma will not mention that you did your first 2 years outside of where you finish. I went to SanDiego City College then San Diego State, I was accepted into UCSD as a transfer student but lived so close to SDSU I had to go there as we had car issues.
     
    #19
  20. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    So just to clarify,
    I live in Canada and my cousin said I can claim in-state residence using their cali adress.
    Am I still qualified for this whole transfer deal?
     
    #20
  21. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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  22. pro_staff

    pro_staff Semi-Pro

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    I know two guys playing on the UCSD team right now. They are definitely beyond 4.5 level. Like others said, your best chance would be to get into the school and try to walk on.
     
    #22
  23. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    ClarkC: Good post. Throw the NTRP ratings out the window. It's a basic gauge but the coach will be able to tell you after a tryout whether or not you're good enough.

    R_Rulez: Since you're not from California, you will have to live in California for at least one year to establish residency. If you are a Canadian citizen there might be immigrations issues to look into as well. I'm not sure about that because rules are different with students than working folks like myself.

    Basically, you cannot just 'use' your relative's address. You have to prove you have lived in California for a year to establish residency. That means you need to be able to show you enrolled in school or you worked here in California; otherwise schools have no clue whether you were really here or not.

    As a 'foreign' student you will have additional barriers to entry because the University of California has a cap on the number of out of state students they can accept. For example, I pay taxes in California so I should get a break for admission to the schools in state. Makes sense, right? This also applies for out of state US citizens but the rules are slightly different.

    If you really have your heart set on attending UCSD, don't despair! You can still try. Without stellar grades, you might have to take the advice of others and go to a junior college (also known as JUCO or CC) first. A junior college is a 2 year school that prepares you for finishing up at a 4 year university like UCSD. You take introductory courses that will be used for more advanced study the following 2 years after. You will have to pay out of state tuition rates, but it's still cheaper than UCSD. After 1 year you will have residency and after 2 years you can transfer. Junior colleges also have tennis teams that you can play for so you have options.

    The big question is whether or not you are willing to leave your family and take a leap of faith by coming to San Diego (or anywhere in California) and studying hard for 2 years so you can transfer in. It's kind of a big step and something you should talk about with your family. It is a beautiful campus and the academics are top notch. Most classes are very competitive which means just about everyone wants an 'A' and they're willing to eat your alive to get it. The good news it that you'll get a world class education even if you don't make the tennis team and that's what important in the end anyways.

    Like I said in another thread, it's better to get a good paying job and play tennis on the side rather than make tennis your life, unless of course you are a world class athlete...then you don't need my advice.

    Let me know if you have any other questions. Cheers.
     
    #23
  24. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Don't you have to have lived in-state for 90 days minimum or something?

    UCSD is a great school, and La Jolla is a great (and expensive) place. San Diego is unmatched for weather and there is also a great recreational tennis scene.
     
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  25. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    ^^^ at least one year. Schools do check and their funding is dependent on the number of residences who attend so there's a lot of incentive to do so.
     
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  26. MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER

    MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER Semi-Pro

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    It's the Golden state, with the "Golden rule" You got gold? You rule.

    As far as using someone else's addresses and such... You are not the first to think of this possibility- And just like Homicide cops, the school administrations... you aren't going to beat them... They do this for a living, and they see RED FLAGS everywhere.

    I would sincerely suggest if your priorities include playing tennis for a school, and to live in San Diego you look at USD- NOT the state public schools.
    San Diego may still be heaven on earth (if you have a lot of money insulating you) I had an Aunt that lived across from Dick VanDy*e in Coronado... Nothing like Bloody Marys at the Hotel, as I recall.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
    #26
  27. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    That's a good point. USD doesn't care about residency since it's a private university. It is, however, <VERY> expensive. I think tuition is close to $30000 US dollars per year. The campus is really nice, though. It's on top of a hill overlooking San Diego.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
    #27
  28. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    UCSD has the hottest girls in the country. though they are a bit stuck up.
     
    #28
  29. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Also depends on whether you are a US or Canadian citizen. If you are considered a foreign student, you cannot avail in-state fees, need to get an I20, and probably pay more than even out of state students.
     
    #29
  30. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    You haven't been to San Diego State, have you? Or USD for that matter.
     
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  31. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    Oh wait. Fedace was joking. My bad.
     
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  32. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    There is also SDSU - sort of a poor cousin to UCSD. Don't know about the tennis scene there though.
     
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  33. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    Academically, yes it is a poor cousin to UCSD. The tennis is more competitive at SDSU because it's a Division I school. They grant full scholarships, though. UCSD does not. I don't think the campus is as nice (I went there for grad school).

    I think we pretty much covered the 3 major universities in San Diego. How about that.
     
    #33
  34. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    There are also small private liberal arts colleges around
     
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  35. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    You cannot be "in-state" in California using your cousin's address. When you apply and you did not graduate in state and your parents file tax returns in Cal., you will set off red flags. You will need to be indepedent and file in state taxes for the last year. Plus, you will need to do this before you are in school and cannot leave the state for extended periods while in school (and yes, they do ask you for proof of rent payments, utilities bills, etc.). As an out of country student, you are not eligible for financial aide and cannot work on a student visa. If money is an issue, you can work in state for a year and then reapply. Admissions are tough, and if you can get into this school, you likely can have your pick of schools. I would expect grades and test scores to be in the top 10% to be competitive. And you are likely not good enough to be a tennis player on the team. As a 4.5without additional credential (tournement wins, ranking, etc.) there is simply too many better players for a small team. You may want to condsider a Div 3 school.
     
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  36. goober

    goober Legend

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    Good luck trying to get in as a foreign student at UCSD. You are much better off trying to get into a private college which does not have residency restrictions. One of my tennis buddies daughters applied there as an out of state just this year. She was in the top 5% of her class. I am not sure what her SATs were but she was a National merit semifinalist on the PSAT. She was not accepted- but she did get accepted at a bunch of other schools though.

    People who just say "oh just get an academic scholarship" don't realize how hard these are to get at the UC schools. The people who get regent scholarships are good enough to go to any school in the country. The represent the top 1% of those applying.
     
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  37. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    There seems to be a place called San Diego Mesa College with a tennis team
     
    #37
  38. goober

    goober Legend

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    junior college- but it actually may be a consideration for the OP. He might be able to transfer after 2 years.
     
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  39. mutantducky

    mutantducky Semi-Pro

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    I went to UCSD and at the time I'd say I was a 4.0 player but now I'm nearing 5.0. I think you would have to be a 5.0 to have a shot. I knew a solid 4.5 player who got beat easily by a couple of players there. Ask the coach though and maybe get some matches in. They have 5.5 and maybe 6.0 players on the team.

    Congrats on going to UCSD--- try to get to the beaches sometime and shop at Trader Joes. and maybe look at joining a club or two
    wear sunscreen:)
     
    #39
  40. mutantducky

    mutantducky Semi-Pro

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    "UCSD has the hottest girls in the country. though they are a bit stuck up."


    NO, not the hottest by a long shot but some good ones---lol. Oh man that is funny.
     
    #40
  41. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    Goober is right. A private college might be a better option. It's really difficult to get into UCSD on your own merit. BTW, a Regent's scholarship is given out by the university based on your test scores and grades. A typical Regents scholar has all A's- maybe 1 B and an SAT I score of 1400 (verbal and math only).

    --> San Diego Mesa College is a public junior college. So is Miramar, City, Southwestern, Palomar, and Grossmont. The only private schools I can think of are Alliant and University of San Diego. Can anyone help me out here?

    Having said that, don't let anyone dissuade you from trying. As a parent, I would tell you to explore your options and talk with your parents. They might have some other ideas.
     
    #41
  42. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    ^^^ don't forget University of Phoenix and National University LOL - you might be able to play tennis online without setting foot on campus
     
    #42
  43. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    LOL! Nice. I won't even go down that road...
     
    #43
  44. goober

    goober Legend

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    yeah Fedace is wrong on both counts. Not only are they not the hottest, I would not classify them as stuck up. Most are pretty serious students. If you want stuck up in San Diego USD probably comes the closest, but it is not like USC.
     
    #44
  45. goober

    goober Legend

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    haha- that's a good one. You can play for their virtual tennis team. Topspin 3 anyone?:)
     
    #45
  46. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Why is it easier for a person coming from out of state to get into a private college as appose to public?
    Does USC have the transfer guarantee?
     
    #46
  47. get it in

    get it in Rookie

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    Public universities by nature have to give preference to their residents. They're the ones who pay the taxes. Private schools don't have those restrictions since they are privately funded.

    USC is the University of Southern California, a big name private school located in Los Angeles. Being a private school, they don't do transfer guarantees. Also, you would have to be a top top top top top player to be on that team. Let's just say they recruited Sam Querrey but he turned them down to go professional.
     
    #47
  48. goober

    goober Legend

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    Public school limit the number of spots for out of state residents. It varies by school but typically this is limited to 1-10% of the school in California. So you are competing with a large number of students for a very small part of the admissions pie compared to the in state students. Just to give you an indication of how many people apply to UC schools, UCLA had over 55,000 applicants last year for their undergrad.
     
    #48
  49. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    In private schools, you can be a dud and get in, if you are rich, your father is a diplomat, your family is an alumns and big donor, or your last name is Bush or Clinton
     
    #49
  50. GeoffB

    GeoffB Rookie

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    I went to UCSD a while back, when it was D3. My younger brother played on the team. I was around 4.0 level, and there was no way I'd have been able to get onto the team. I played a tournament just to check it out and lost 6-0, 6-0 (though it was to a fairly strong player on the team).

    As a 4.5, you're probably looking to walk onto a team. Clearly, a 4.5 can play college tennis, but you probably aren't going to be recruited onto a school with a generous tennis scholarship.

    UCSD is one of those schools where you can "walk on", but you're talking about a university in Southern California with around 20,000 undergraduates. So even if you aren't competing for a spot on a D1 team where the players are specifically recruited with full scholarships, you're looking at a tough climb. I'd say that's the case for all UC's (UC Santa Cruz, for instance, is D3, but sheer size of the student body combined with a norcal location means they get a good draw despite the absence of scholarships).

    If it's really important to play tennis in college, you'd probably be better off looking for smaller universities where the competition for walk-on is less daunting. I've played with former college players at the 4.0 level, so clearly a 4.5 can get a spot, you just have to be careful about where you play.

    By the way, a lot of community colleges do have teams - maybe that (followed by a transfer) would be the way to go... at least then you'd have a better sense of your chances.
     
    #50

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