Ultrasound and Tennis Elbow

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Edberg_Fan, Nov 6, 2007.

  1. P_D

    P_D New User

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    I am getting a little worried now. It cracks often now and you can hear it pretty good. I do not think that I am in pain. I have started to try to stengthen it but I am confused as to what the best way to heal this injury is. What kind of doctor should I go to to get it checked out? Thanks guys!
     
    #51
  2. Edberg_Fan

    Edberg_Fan New User

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    PD, What I did was go to my primary doctor and then he referred me to my Othopedic. I had to do this for insurance purposes so I would be covered by my insurance carrier.

    dtd82, with regards to the gym and elbow related activity; It is not very much. I start out by stetching (forearms, biceps and triceps). Next onto the upper body machine (it is like an upper body bicycle). This gets the blood into my arms/shoulders and really warms and loosens things up. Then I will do some light to moderate excercises, typically 3 sets of 15 reps each (preacher arm curl (biceps), preacher hammer curl (forearms), tricep extensions (pulldown for triceps). Then I do some excercises with the tension bands and focal on streatching and working my rotator cuff. Then it's back to the streatching and finally icing. All this takes me a bit over an hour and I do it 2x per week when I'm not playing tennis. Some of the stuff I do at my PT which is now once per week. Other non tennis days, I'm also in the gym working lower body, chest, and back. With lots of streatching after each workout. I'm finding that I feel so much better with stetching now that I'm over 36!
     
    #52
  3. hyogen

    hyogen Hall of Fame

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    i've CURED my tennis elbow by going to really flexible frames. try something with around 60 or less flexibility.

    about 64 or 63 is where i start getting tennis elbow.
     
    #53
  4. dtd82

    dtd82 Rookie

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    EF, thanks for the overview of you routine....I need a place to start (soon) and it's nice to see what you're doing largely fits with what I'm thinking. Oh, and 36 huh.....pup! (I'm 48!...or 28 depending on chronological count or delusion count...)

    Flexible frames, hum....haven't re-started frame shopping yet, but I'll look into that stat.
     
    #54
  5. dtd82

    dtd82 Rookie

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    Just a thought, both EF and I place a bit of the blame for our plights on the k95 team, which is rated 59 flex....
     
    #55
  6. Edberg_Fan

    Edberg_Fan New User

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    I think that you not only have to consider flex in the racket but also weight, balance, grip size, string, tension... all come into play. I love my Microgel Prestige Mid!
     
    #56
  7. Edberg_Fan

    Edberg_Fan New User

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    Feeling a little elbow soreness after Sunday's workout so I'm going to see my deep tissue therapy specialist to address it before it gets worst. I think I'll need to do this for maintenance.

    Here's what her flyer says:
    ---------------------------
    What causes pain?
    Pain is caused by "trigger points" may be the biggest cause of disability, lost time at work and time away from professional or amateur sports. Even without lost work time, the pain caused by trigger points can make it impossible to enjoy one's daily life. Trigger points are usually caused by repetition, overdoing, accidents, or falls. There are studies suggesting that trigger points are a component of up to 93 percent of the pain seen in pain clinics, and that trigger points are the sole cause of such pain as much as 85 percent of the time.

    What is a trigger point?
    A trigger point is simply a "knot" in the muscle tissue. A muscle can develop serveral trigger points. Trigger points affect a muscle by keeping it both tight and weak. During activities, the shortened muscle fibers pull at their attachment sites, usually at a joint, creating pain and loss of movement. Trigger points typically radiate or refer pain to a joint, however, the cause is usually some distance away from that joint. Failure to treat the area that causes the pain is the reason most conventional treatments fail.
    the costant tension that exists in a muscle containing a trigger point restricts circulation and nutrients needed for healing. This can cause conditions to persist for months or even years unless there is a specific intervention to release the trigger points. Strengthening or stretching a tight muscle before releasing the trigger points, can cause further injury and pain.

    What to expect from treatment?
    Significant relief of symptons often comes in just one treatment. Most problems can be eliminated in very few treatments. Even longstanding chronic conditions can be cleared up in as little as six weeks. Most surgeries and needless suffering can be avoided.
    --------------------------------------

    Thought I'd share this as I and many of my club members have received excellent results for our TE problems.
     
    #57
  8. dtd82

    dtd82 Rookie

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    Keep us posted EF- the info is very helpful for the rest of us analyzing our options........
     
    #58
  9. Edberg_Fan

    Edberg_Fan New User

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    Went to see the therapist on Wednesday. She was able to relieve my issues within a 1/2 hr treatment so I didn't have to pay the full amount. She said that as I progress, the treatments will be just maintenance. In fact, she said that many Pros get this type of therapy frequently.
     
    #59
  10. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    Edberg Fan,

    There's only so much that deep-tissue massage and active release technique can do.

    Their selling point is that they would get rid of the so-called knots or adhesion of the muscle tissues.

    However, a healthy tendon does not hurt even when pulled by tight muscles with so-called "trigger points."

    I believe what massage and active release does is relieve the tension on the tendon from those tight muscles, but the tendon must heal itself on its own.

    And for the tendon to do this, it takes time. It will take icing and resting for probably months.

    I wouldn't get back into tennis or arm exercises too soon.
     
    #60
  11. Edberg_Fan

    Edberg_Fan New User

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    scotus - I agree with what you are saying. The deep tissue resolves issues that my body cannot by itself. I am playing moderately as I don't believe in 100% rest to full recovery. I've seen many people rest for months or a year and then just to get TE back shortly after returning. For me, moderate activity and PT is the key to slowly get back into tennis with a moderatley healthy elbow. Allowing healing along the way with resistance.
     
    #61

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