Up To You! Call Your Sectional Office!

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by tennis5, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    1) Please call your sectional office.
    2) Please forward this as an email to other junior parents.
    Let's get the word out. :)


    From Zoo Tennis.
    http://tenniskalamazoo.blogspot.com/2012/03/tom-walkers-call-to-action-on-proposed.html

    BIG THANK YOU TO COLETTE FOR GETTING THE WORD OUT AND FOR PRINTING THE ENTIRE LETTER!


    WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012

    Tom Walker's Call to Action on Proposed USTA Junior Competition Structure

    Tom Walker, who lives in my hometown, is one of the top player development coaches in the country.
    He is here in Mobile with 16s Winter National champion Paul Oosterbaan and as a result of many conversations with players, parents and other coaches, has written this position paper on the USTA Junior Competition Committee's proposals, up for vote on Saturday, March 17.

    I am publishing it below, in its entirety.

    Raise your voice now!

    Sectional Uprising Required To Save Junior National Tournament Structure


    Is it too late?

    Has a runaway National Junior Competition Committee already:

    1. Eliminated 2 of 4 National Junior championships? (Winter and Spring Championships)

    2. Reduced the National Championship draws to 128? (64 if you're in the 12s)

    3. Mandated that players are only selected for Nationals through their sectional quota or by one of the USTA's 16 WildCards?

    4. Mandated that players must play regional events in their region? Hey listen up "******* and Pacific Northwest" you're in the same region. How is that going to work? That commute for the 8:00 a.m. match will be a tough one.


    Meanwhile, here in in Mobile Alabama, the boys and girls National 18s Spring Championships are under way.

    College coaches are busy scouting and observing their future charges.

    This event attracts outstanding young people from every section.

    Slowly the word is spreading that this and other National events are now on the chopping block.

    The overwhelming questions are why and what can we do to prevent this from occurring?

    College coaches are equally perplexed.

    They fail to understand how the elimination of these events helps anyone except foreign competition for collegiate tennis spots.

    Why were players, parents and coaches not consulted?

    Is it coincidental that no USTA coach or representative is here in Mobile?

    Time is ticking away to save these tournaments and a system that allows multiple avenues of acceptance into National events.

    Unless a majority of sections vote on Saturday to reject the Junior Competition Committee action, the policies will be adopted.

    Yet there is still a glimmer of hope.

    This is buoyed by several Sections that are now on record as prepared to reject these proposals.

    There is still time for each of us to act.

    Contact your sectional presidents. Tell them to vote no.

    Further question them as to why no public forum on these issues was ever offered.

    The changes being voted are dangerous and destructive to junior tennis within the USA.

    The idea of reducing costs and making the system more affordable is a noble cause.

    However the premise of hacking off events and players as a remedy is based upon ill-conceived assumptions.

    Why should we cast at developmental levels with smaller nets?

    This philosophy will seriously undermine our game's status.

    USTA tennis has had a track record of radical action with each outgoing president.

    Gentle tweaking is what is required instead of wholesale amputation of the National schedule.

    The sections must Stop! and Think!

    Before acting, produce a study that has been initiated showing the impact on first year player and the opportunities afforded by larger draws.

    Are their proposals simply based on a personal assumption that smaller draws are more concentrated and thereby more efficient?

    Players that excelled in the hand-picked Orange Bowl fell to unseeded players in the Winter Nationals.

    Why limit these kinds of playing opportunities?

    Please take the time to fully evaluate and measure the impact of radical change.

    1. Current National Championships draw sizes: Hard (192), Clay (192), Spring (128), Winter (128)
    ( spring and winter are one hundred and twenty eight - not coming through.
    Also, the 2014 plan is to make Winter National a 16 draw, Easter National a 32 draw, and reduce Hard and Clay).

    Reduction of the draw sizes is short-sighted and fraught with peril.

    Grow the game, don't shrink it.

    Reaching these tournaments is a measurable and motivating accomplishment for many young players across our country.

    The current system provides an obtainable goal for those with drive and passion.

    It provides a platform for future college players and their recruitment.

    The argument that initial matches are uncompetitive is a half-truth.

    Reduction in draw sizes will not fix these issues as quotas automatically put weaker players in the draws.

    Pure quotas do not protect an individual player's effort from any section.

    A safety net based on national performance must be in place.

    Giving any panel 16 wild cards is wrong.

    The saving of a day is never worth the loss of participation that occurs with larger fields in these key events.

    It will eliminate personal effort for geographic location.

    When have you heard for any major sports team ask to cut the number of teams in the playoffs?

    Or reducing the major slams…?

    Let’s shrink Wimbledon also to 64 or 32.

    Parents don’t mind this expense.

    It is the costly ramp up that’s a problem.

    Unintended consequences of reduced draw sizes will include:

    1. Outstanding first year players may not get in.
    This will reduce playing opportunities.
    Additionally the birthday rule unfairly gives the oldest players a ranking advantage within the sectional quotas. (This squashes the better younger players)

    2. Limits players and access for college tennis recruiting

    3. Shrinks the game

    4. Financially injures current supporting tournaments and cities

    5. Puts more players at risk of shaky sections and singular section results.

    6. Luck of the draws in smaller sections will dictate players (possible manipulation)

    7. Deserving players not getting in because of geographical residency

    8. Decreases skill level and improvement in lower players/ coaches by not exposing them to upper end skill and talent

    Conclusion-

    Sections must be held accountable to study the effects proposed changes could bring before rushing into action.
    Reduction is not a positive move in our major events.
    This plan does not concentrate the process.
    Rather, it excludes players that may become significant collegiate players and perhaps professionals.

    You may be limiting a future champion by reducing numbers at the youngest levels.
    We must not proceed under misguided assumptions.
    The failing of world class USTA players is not the overall junior system.
    It should not be allowed to be the scapegoat.
    The reality is that many benefit from the collegiate system which is fed by the current junior structure.

    To develop top players training and support is required.
    This can be accomplished by adding new specialized events.
    To reduce costs, regionalization can also be implemented.
    However a player's skill should ultimately be the deciding factor in their selection of National championships.
    The geographic location where they reside should not be held against anyone.
    We must maintain measures that account for these aberrations and will not fail the individual’s effort.
    I suspect that closer evaluation would lead to surprising data of players that would have been excluded in years past.
    Please slow down and defeat this proposal.

    After decades involved in junior tennis, I remain perplexed of how out of touch this proposal is.
    It is now up to the Sectional leaders to save our juniors from a national committee that has run amok.
    Players, coaches and parents should contact their sectional offices quickly to have their voices heard before it is too late.

    USTA Southern: John Callen 770-368-8200 x123
    USTA New England: Heather Anastos 508-366-3450, ext. 29
    USTA *******: Mark Saunders 317-577-5130 x222
    USTA Eastern: Jenny Schnitzer 914-697-2393
    USTA Florida: Doug Booth 386-671-8925
    USTA Intermountain: Matthew Warren, 303-695-4117 x222
    USTA Middle States: Marlynn Orlando 610-935-5000 ext. 235
    USTA Mid-Atlantic: Rod Dulany 703-556-6120 x13
    USTA Northern: Mike Goldammer 952-358-3284
    USTA Missouri Valley: Mary Buschmann 913-322-4824
    USTA Texas: Ken McAllister 512-443-1334 ext. 201
    USTA Southwest: Eric Mitchell 480-289-2351 ext. 107
    USTA Pacific Northwest: Bill Leong 503-520-1877 x11
    USTA Northern California: Steve Leube 510-748-7362
    USTA Southern California: Henry Talbert 310-208-3838
    USTA Hawaii-Pacific: Ron Romano 808-585-9526
    USTA Caribbean: Lydia de la Rosa 787-726-8782 x 228

    Tom Walker
    Director of Tennis
    Kalamazoo YMCAs
    (269)598-8767



    POSTED BY COLETTE LEWIS AT 9:15 AM

    LABELS: PLAYER DEVELOPMENT, USTA, USTA NATIONAL TOURNAMENTS
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2012
    #1
  2. seminoleG

    seminoleG Semi-Pro

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    This is buoyed by several Sections that are now on record as prepared to reject these proposals.

    Anyone know which sections are against the Proposals?
     
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  3. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    I heard the big sections are against it, which would leave the small sections as the question mark?
     
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  4. hound 109

    hound 109 Rookie

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    Thanks for the link Tennis 5.

    Dropping the L1 (WinterNational) between Christmas & New Year is a travesty:

    - It's the one L1 National that normal people can get a few days off & travel to. (w/o taking an entire week of vacation (or two weeks?) in the summer).
    - It's the only L1 not in the Eastern Time Zone.
    - It's the only L1 during the 8 months between August & April.

    All because the weenies from the East Coast don't want to travel to AZ. (or is there another reason?)


    And that "region" featuring kids from Seattle AND Cleveland is a hoot. So much for the "travel cheaply" & travel close to home argument. (I'm actually OK with my kid's "region". Good competition & nice venues in AZ & SoCal. Although Southern venues (for me) could be closer, cheaper & also offer good competition.) But why "fix" a problem that ain't broke?
     
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  5. watergirl

    watergirl New User

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    I asked my very large section how they would vote and was informed that they had not made up their mind and that proposals/things change before the votes.

    So what I gathered is that there will be a lot of politicking behind the scenes for who know what deals and that the proposal as we know it could be changed to ensure that passage of what Nationals really wants occurs.
     
    #5
  6. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    First, we had the draw cuts, then the point cuts, and now they are trying to cut out whole National tournaments.

    A shrinking trend is happening.

    Although, the USTA does not publicize the changes until they are in full effect,

    this is the one opportunity to make our voices heard.

    The problem is not a lot of people read this message board.

    I am suggesting copying the above letter and emailing it to different friends in different sections. ASK THEM TO CALL.

    I don't believe the USTA is accountable to anyone as there are no elections here,
    but the sectionals are made up of people who do care about junior tennis, and do care that it continues in this country.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2012
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  7. HIGH-TECH TENNIS

    HIGH-TECH TENNIS Rookie

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    We're in Mobile and we had the pleasure of meeting and chatting with Tom...I knew we were on the same side (the side of junior tennis players) but his player got injured and he left before I saw his Call to Action and before I realized I should have kissed him ON THE LIPS for using his big voice a la Wayne Bryan and speaing up on behalf of junior tennis. Please do what you can to distribute this information...It is time for people to stand up and be counted!!!
     
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  8. thepastord

    thepastord New User

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    Do you really believe that line of BS??? :shock::shock:

    I don't care to be blunt, politicking, deal making? That has already been done, where they wanted it to occur......... As honorable as the protest is, the USTA Junior tennis system is sunk. The past three years have been a tabloid play out! They know, they all know, and that line of BS, is just an effort to stop the "HEAT" on them. They have been instructed to say, "they have not made up their mind".

    Four Words- Find A Different Route

    If tennis is truly the sport for your young person, find another route, or reconsider their "sports choice".:(:

    Ask other parents, if they are really honest, that is what you hear.


    So sorry folks.................
     
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  9. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    Any youngsters out there who might be reading this.........if tennis is truly the sport for you, give it all you got!

    According to TRN, there are about 400 boys and about 400 women from the high school graduating class of 2012 who will be playing college tennis next year. Lots of these youngsters have earned full or partial scholarships based on their tennis accomplishments and abilities. What great opportunities and experiences these youngsters will have!

    Even if you are not good enough for college tennis, you can play the sport recreationaly well into your golden years.

    I am a parent. Not gonna let thepastord call me dishonest. This is what you are hearing from me.

    Not saying sorry to anyone................
     
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  10. thepastord

    thepastord New User

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    I don't disagree with that point, However, I disagree with the approach of the USTA Juniors, as the only way to go. People who are dealing with this situation now, will see it very differently 3/5/8 years down the road. The big picture of life tends to be too big in relation to the "Goals" of **most** tennis kids participating the small world of tennis. I encourage kids/parents to play tennis, but the big picture is very important in regards to the value of time, money, eventual career aspirations...... Do most kids know what they want to be at 9/10/14 or even 16??? Many do, many don't. You know like I know, most of the tennis parents involved with USTA Junior Tennis, just get sucked into a whirlwind of chasing their tale. Tennis is a great sport of a lifetime, but keep it in the proper perspective. I read these blogs all the time, and I tend to see the same thing over and over again. People lost in a "Fantasy Land".

    I recommend that kids try the sport out, play it.... Figure out where you are in regards to what you would like to accomplish. Don't disregard other sports.......... Lastly, Don't think the USTA is the "ONLY WAY". There are other ways to get the job done. Don't just go by what USTA people tell you. Talk to others, talk to a lot of different coaches at different college levels. Know what your getting into, don't get sold on any "Agenda".:)

    Tennis is a sport that most people don't know what they are getting into. Recreational tennis is a entirely different thing than going the USTA Junior route. Best advice, ask a parent of kid who is 2/4/6 years out of Junior Tennis. I think it is one of those types of things that, you just don't really get it until you have gone through it. Best to learn the facts early in my opinion, it can save you a lot of grief.
     
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  11. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Pastord,

    I always appreciate when you add your two cents as you have really lived through the process.
    At this point, I do encourage parents of girls for this sport, I do not for the boys.
    I know of no boys this year getting any scholarship money.

    However, this thread is about 2014, and not the pluses and minuses of spending money on tennis and the paybacks....

    So............We still need people to:

    1) Make a call to your sectional. Tomorrow is the last day.

    2) Email the above letter to your kids' hitting partners, coaches, anyone involved in junior tennis THAT ACTUALLY CARES ABOUT OUR SYSTEM.
    Please ask them to call.
    PLEASE ASK THEM TO SEND THE LETTER ON.

    Most people don't read this blog.
    At the last tournament, parents were still just grappling with the new 2012 point system.
    When I mentioned the upcoming 2014 changes, they were aghast and had no idea.
     
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  12. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Just checked my emails... I am flooded with this letter :)

    PLEASE PUSH. ONE DAY LEFT.

    LET'S SEE IF WE CAN CRISSCROSS THE COUNTRY BY EMAIL TONIGHT :)
     
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  13. TennisFan2Day

    TennisFan2Day Rookie

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    There are a lot of politics behind all of this.

    What many people don't realize is that the sections are scared to vote against what the USTA/JCC wants because they are afraid that they will not receive the extra junior funding that the JCC gives those sections who support them.
     
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  14. thepastord

    thepastord New User

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    Sorry if this seemed off topic, but it really isn't............ Here is what TennisFan2Day (BELOW) Says, and I agree


    This is the root of the problem here.......... POLITICS. Also, this stuff, that they are doing has been in the works for at least three years. The academy that we were affiliated with at the time was involved with the actual process, as part of the "Player Development" so called ***Committee*** They were flying around attending the meetings when all this crap was being arranged. I have to say, honestly, at least WE knew it what was coming, and we adjusted ourselves accordingly. We knew how bad it was going to get, and opted for better/practical adjustments (for our situation).

    I suppose the real problem is the folks WHO DIDN'T know it was coming..... I tried to warn people, but sometimes people don't act until it is too late. I do hope for the sake of Junior Tennis, it does not prevail. Unfortunately, regardless of what folks are being told with the "Voting Business" not being done..... This ship has already left port. Your dealing with the USTA, they don't care what you think. They have a agenda, and they will follow through with it, no ifs, whats, about it. I project a five/ten year of a disastrous state of junior tennis, then everyone will be going through more changes, hopefully correcting their denial and stupidity. Until then, folks are going to be faced with a big brick wall. Solid potentials being shut out, hand picked entrants, and as others have said, stuck playing the same old same old. Sad, but it is just the way the system is structured, and that is the way they want it.

    Wishing everyone the best, as the pastord is signing off for the last time.


    KEYPOINT:
    There are a lot of politics behind all of this.

    What many people don't realize is that the sections are scared to vote against what the USTA/JCC wants because they are afraid that they will not receive the extra junior funding that the JCC gives those sections who support them.
     
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  15. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Pastord,

    Hope you keep posting :)
    Some of the older parents, Keysmickey, for example give such valuable info, examples and personal stories as they have lived through it.

    Yes, I agree, it is a long term agenda. Looking at the changes, as they slowly have been rolling out, it is like food rationing, first they take away your juice, then the milk, now the water.... and they did it on purpose in a slow manner.

    The difference is people were in the dark before.
    Now, my email box is flooded with this letter.

    When they got rid of the 12's tournaments, they screwed up that group of kids permanently.
    Now, we are talking about super national cuts (50% of the tournaments gone) that will affect everyone.

    I am still positive that if enough people speak up
    TODAY, WE CAN STILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

    The USTA IS A BLOATED, CORRUPT MACHINE THAT ANSWERS TO NO ONE.
    BUT, THE SECTIONALS HAVE TO DEAL WITH THE PARENTS.......

    PLEASE CALL TODAY.
     
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  16. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Pulling some of the comments from Zoo tennis, better articulated than I can do here....


    Susan - Ct said...
    Thank you for publishing Tom Walker's call to action.
    Folks, please stand up and be counted.


    3/14/2012
    Fedup said...
    Gotta love the USTA . They just reduced the draw sizes to 32, and now they are getting rid of two of the national tournaments. How the heck do the college coaches ever get to see the juniors play if there are no tournaments for the kids to get into. The college coaches will just end up taking more foreign kids.


    3/14/2012
    Tenniscrazy said...
    Kiss college tennis good bye for our kids with these new changes.


    3/14/2012
    John said...
    Colette,

    You are a class act for showing both sides.
    This is just another nail in the coffin for American tennis.


    3/14/2012
    Tennisdad said...
    The problem with a predatory, monopoly is that they have no accountability to anyone.

    Add that in with a not for profit where the executives get paid millions of dollars to produce a world class athlete and you begin to understand why they have to get rid of the other competition that could hurt their PD players.

    THUS THE REASONING FOR THE REDUCED DRAWS AND THE INCREASE IN WILD CARDS.


    3/14/2012
    prevent injuries! said...
    Add to the argument: players who are sidelined for more than a few months due to injury, illness, family death, emergencies, etc, will lose so much ground they will likely not recover their rankings. Players and parents will feel compelled (even more than they already do) to push through injuries just to maintain rankings, jeopardizing the players' health and long-term best interests.


    3/14/2012

    Jill said...
    These new changes are awful.
    What's next. Take away the kids' racquets?



    3/15/2012
    Antonio Mora said...
    It's interesting to see how much energy is wasted on the handful of kids who are wealthy enough to game the system. Who cares? In the end, they will not do well unless they can play. So we reduce draw size to cut back a few kids who aren't worthy at the expense of the many who are?

    If this is all about who is worthy, why has is little said about the real elephant in the room, the quotas being assigned to each region? If it's all about the best playing the best, why factor in quantity of USTA players in a region into the equation at all? If SoCal has 30% of the best players, that's what its quota should be (personally, I'd prefer no quotas). Other regions should not have inflated numbers just because they have more players.

    Also, while rich kids may be able to travel, kids who are "rich" by living in weaker sections will be able to accrue tons of points playing their section's weak opponents, while kids in tough sections will have a rough time getting the national ranking they deserve (and that will allow them to get into the tournaments where they will get the varied competition they need to fully develop their talent). That's always been true, but this proposal makes it worse.

    The unstated reason for this proposal is the belief that it will help return the US to international dominance. An important objective, but if the theory doesn't pan out in practice, lots of kids will get hurt in the process. I'm not one of those who sees conspiracy theories everywhere. I think the USTA has good intentions. But we all know the saying about how the path to hell is paved.

    Inclusion should be the USTA's objective, not exclusion, and, unfortunately, that's what this will lead to.

    Finally, why not include parents in the process before making such radical changes? People would be far less upset and we likely would have ended up with a better plan.


    3/15/2012
    goodsports said...
    College coaches go to tournaments to look at players, not rankings. They may arrive for later rounds to see those who have advanced by on-court performance, not those who have accumulated points. Smaller draws will actually make the round of 32 less attractive to coaches because many deserving players will have been filtered out by the ranking system, rather than by on-court play.

    The USTA ranking system is actually the USTA entry selection system. According to Mitchell Alpert, USTA ranking chairman, USTA rankings using points per round create ordered lists that are reliable (can be duplicated) but are not predictive (don't indicate who will win in a head to head match between ranked players).

    Since the rankings don't reflect players' on-court abilities, it is imperative that the opportunities to compete at the national level be expanded, not contracted.

    Prior to 2011 National Level 3 (Regional) events were sprinkled throughout the year. In 2011 the USTA compressed the Level 3 events into 4 weekends and reduced the draw size of Level 2 events from 64 to 32. These changes led to a desperation to play every event possible. No longer could players manage their national play around their personal schedules. Players felt compelled to play every event possible, because there were no longer opportunities for National play (Level 3) throughout the year.

    Many issues have solutions that USTA seems to disregard in favor of their "smaller is better" solution. Here are two examples:

    1. If players avoiding sectional play in favor of National play is a problem, the solution is very simple.... Require Sectional endorsement for all players to National Championships, as was the case prior to the Optimum Schedule being implemented. That would give each section the freedom to decide the appropriate amount of sectional play that is best for their players. Since each section is unique, the section can best determine how much or how little sectional play will benefit their players.

    2. National Open draw sizes were reduced to 32 and the tournament shortened 3 days in 2011, allegedly to avoid missing school. However, a 64-draw could have been played in 3 days, as well. In the 5-day 64-draw format 2 rounds (more than half of the total number of matches) were always played on the first day, so there would be no problem playing the final 4 rounds on the next two days. The quarterfinal losers wouldn't feed into the consolations, but that is a small concession, compared to reducing the opportunities for everyone by 50%.

    The 3-day format has made the National Opens more popular, so reducing the draw sizes just to have smaller draws is illogical.

    Some in positions of prominence are convinced that "smaller is better". This is tragically short-sighted. It took years to correct the mistake of eliminating National play for 12 and under players.

    The draw reductions to 64 for 12's National Championships and the failure to have any events for this age group other than the National Clay Courts and The Nationals seem to contradict the emphasis on younger age tennis in America.

    If having too much opportunity for National play is driving players away from tennis, then it is up to the USTA to support those who are financially challenged by the system, not contract the National environment so that those who choose to avail themselves of the opportunity to compete and develop in a national setting are not allowed to do so.

    I'm sorry, but Smaller is not Better.


    3/15/2012
    TennisFan2Day said...
    When you make draws smaller and limit where players can play you are not "growing the game" you are stiffling it.

    In the meantime the United States Golf Association (USGA) is adding more qualifying tournaments for the Jr Amateur Championship. In the early 80s there were 16 qualifying sites of 96 players. Last year there were 61 qualifying sites of 96 players. The total number of entries trying to qualify for the Junior Amateur is up to 4,500. The reason they keep adding more, is because more people want to play and the USGA knows that if you are good enough you will make it and the rest won't. The difference is that the USGA isn't in the business of trying to build a champion by being arrogant enough to take 8 kids in each age group to a private course everyday and thinking that they know everything. They don't travel them all around the country burning up millions of dollars. Instead they build a model structure that grows the game despite a downfall in the economy.

    One thing that will kill tennis is when a player is out for 6 months in the current system because of an arm or ankle injury and then gives up because there is no chance of working their way back up, unless you are a friend of the program.

    Why would players who have 5 hours a day to train with the best coaches in the country and not have to worry about how much it costs, not be able to qualify for tournaments on their own accord? The reason for the wildcards is very transparent with the new proposals. Since the USTA PD players will not be participating in their sectional events, then there had to be a way to get them into the big events. In the meantime, turning their backs on the very system that the rest of the players are supposed to adhere to. The truth is that Jay Berger and Patrick McEnroe are doing anything they can to make the USTA Player Development look like it is a success.

    Lets look at the Boys 16 & 18 National Champions for the past 5 years:

    2011
    18 Singles: Jack Sock - Coached by Mike Wolf
    16 Singles: Ronnie Schneider - Coached by Bryan Smith
    2010
    18 Singles: Jack Sock - Coached by Mike Wolf
    16 Singles: Michael Redlicki - Coached by Sylvain Guichard (The USTA PD was not interested in him until he won)
    2009
    18 Singles: Chase Buchanan - Coached by Al Matthews then the USTA
    16 Singles: Gonzales Austin - Coached by his father
    2008
    18 Singles: Austin Krajicek - Coached by Steve Smith and IMG Bollettieri
    16 Singles: Jordan Cox - Coached by IMG Bollettieri
    2007
    18 Singles: Michael McClune - Coached by Nick Fustar
    16 Singles: Tennys Sandgren - Coached by his parents

    Do I need to say any more when it comes to this?
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2012
    #16
  17. tennisforlife77

    tennisforlife77 Rookie

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    anyone going to be at the meeting or know someone who is who could give an update?
     
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  18. Tennisstringz

    Tennisstringz New User

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    If these changes go through kiss the usta goodbye. Someone please start up anither junior tennis option, the way baseball and basketball has options. It would be relatively easy. As long as the new league enters players in events from all over the country and tennisrecruiting.net enters its results into their ranking, this eague would take off like a rocket. Give all five star kids in the trn ranking free entry, and automatic pass into the final 32 or 64 and the rest of the kids play a qualifier to 32 or 64 who then play these five star / blue chips. Top kids from these tourneys play a tourney for internatl kids who want US scholarships. The prize could be college grant money of some sort.

    Do the same with three star tournaments etc, earning a chance to become four star.

    Do about six of these a year for ages 16 u, 18 u and you eliminated any need for national usta presence. They can stick with their professional kids, we ll just find the college kids.
     
    #18
  19. Tennisstringz

    Tennisstringz New User

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    Oh yeah, and use the tournaments the usta dropped as the flagship tourneys for this new junior option... Oh well, it ll never hapoen, but it should.
     
    #19
  20. jbw

    jbw New User

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    I received am email from someone attending the USTA meetings that both call items had passed the initial Executive Committee preview. The actual vote on both items is on Monday. He said that all indications are that both proposals will pass.
     
    #20
  21. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

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    That's a great idea, I've brought that up before with Dallas O., but could not get any response.
     
    #21
  22. tennisforlife77

    tennisforlife77 Rookie

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    The Little Mo organization is competing with the USTA on the 10U scene. Maybe they could be convinced to expand to the older age groups and run a competing national circuit. Would only work if TRN were willing to pull the results
     
    #22
  23. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

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    That would be great if Little Mo expanded to all age groups.

    At my daughters first Little Mo tournament, the tournament director gave us a little speech about the rules and how players and parents should behave during the match.

    That never happened with USTA tournaments.
     
    #23
  24. Tennisstringz

    Tennisstringz New User

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    I've seen Little Mo, and it is an excellent tournament and very highly regarded. If they expanded it through all age groups and tennis recruiting.net used their results, then it would take off and fill the void that USTA created.

    Tennis recruiting.net doesn't realize the power they yield. Kids in high school don't give a crap about USTA rankings, and I doubt that coaches really do. Everyone who knows follows TRN.

    If TRN doesn't expand, I hate to say it, but they are dead in the water. Maybe that's what USTA wants. To be the only ranking system... one that correlates more to how much money you spend on tennis and paying for USTA tournaments than who you can beat. The only hope TRN has is that kids start playing more OPEN tourneys outside of their section, not worrying about getting any points, but to just get a chance to play other highly ranked kids and improve their TRN ranking.
     
    #24
  25. Tennisstringz

    Tennisstringz New User

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    We pay the USTA for their product. We don't have to use it.

    HOW ABOUT WE DECIDE THAT ALL TENNIS KIDS NEED TIME OFF ON DECEMBER AND MAY AND NOBODY SIGNS UP FOR A SINGLE USTA TOURNAMENT DURING THOSE MONTHS? MAYBE THE USTA WILL BE AFRAID THAT THEIR USERS WON'T BE FUNDING THEM EITHER?
     
    #25
  26. seminoleG

    seminoleG Semi-Pro

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    As an outsider (~2yrs) I see the USTA as a Entity looking for a mission. I have often stated that the shoe and apparal MFG could create a Tour and with certian aspects could dwarf the USTA system. USTA is a Legacy company like Macy's, Sears, etc and lacks the Nimble movement required in this NOW world.

    We have taken a few weeks off as my daughter has finished Travel Soccer and I have spent these weeks hearing how US Soccer kids are developed. We also have a Junior Golfer on the team and I know fairly well how they run their federation.

    All have suggested that from what I could explain to them the USTA seems to be closing the doors to many with the expectation their Talent ID system and Parents that send videos etc, will be enought to justify the new Tournament setup.

    To a man they all believe USTA has to protect those that buy into the system, against those that don't. So closing the Draws down and expanding the WC does just that.

    IF ONE STARTS A COMPETING TOUR the end result is no support ever from the USTA in the form of Hospitality or WC's. Also if you have a Top 5 USTA kid why sould they play someone out of the Rankings?

    But yes if we all decided to not enter a Tournament the week of xxxxx, maybe that sends a message.
     
    #26
  27. Tennisstringz

    Tennisstringz New User

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    Cal Ripken started a great baseball league. AAU basketball is probably more important than high school basketball in recruiting. There is a huge need here... if someone who had legitimacy in tennis, such as Agassi... would see the problems with getting American kids into college scholarship spots, and start a subset of highschool age national tourneys, with the help of Dallas Oliver, the monopoly would end, and tennis would be revived in this country.

    Tourneys stratified for kids who want high level D-1, mid-level major, or academic type players where coaches for those types of colleges would be present at specified types of tourneys. Basically Blue-chip-five star tourneys, five star-four star tourneys, and two star three star tourneys. Coaches know what kind of players they can get and they attend the corresponding tourneys. They may be looking for an underrated star etc.

    This wouldn't hurt the USTA... they'd still be needed for the initial staging of abilities, but the refined head to head competition necessary at college recruiting age (tourneys limited to freshman thru seniors) would be supplied by an option like this.

    Why doesn't anybody ever think of what is really needed and supply it? They'd be stinking rich.
     
    #27
  28. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    A couple of random thoughts.

    First, I have always found Dallas Oliver to be very responsive and helpful. He must have had a good reason if he did not respond to someone.

    Dallas has responded in one of these threads that he thinks there will continue to be enough "connectivity" under the new system to make the TRN ranking system valid. Separately, if the new system encourages kids to "not worry about getting points" but just "get a chance to play other highly ranked kids", then this would be a very positive result.

    Cal Ripken Baseball is not a league. Cal Ripken Baseball sets rules for leagues to follow for players in the 6-12 year old range.

    Leagues that affiliate with Cal Ripken Baseball are eligible to enter All-Star teams in a tournament in each age group 10, 11, and 12 that will ultimately crown a national champion and World Series champion. To get to the national championship (held in Aberdeen, Maryland for the 12s each year), an All-Star team has to win its local Cal Ripken District, then State, then Region (I believe there are 10 regions). These ten teams join 4-6 international teams.....at least for the 12s......in the Cal Ripken World Series tournament in Aberdeen. The way the tournament is run, the American teams play each other and crown a National Champion, and the International teams play each other and crown an International Champion. Then the National and International Champs play each other for the World Series title

    So, there are only 10 teams affiliated with Cal Ripken Baseball.....in the whole country....that get to play out of region. If I am reading the objections to the USTA's new system correctly, this is not a model that those objectors would wish to follow
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
    #28
  29. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Tennisstringz - Thanks for starting another thread for ideas for future tennis playing.

    If anyone is privy to memos, amended proposals, or just information about the end results of the conference ( ending today?), please post it here.

    Thanks.
     
    #29
  30. tennisforlife77

    tennisforlife77 Rookie

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    proposals passed 16-1 - wasn't even close at the end. SOuthern Section voted no. I'm not clear on the politics of the USTA but clearly the feedback to the sectional reps was overwhelmingly negative but obviously had no impact.
     
    #30
  31. HIGH-TECH TENNIS

    HIGH-TECH TENNIS Rookie

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    Have talked about this to dozens of parents/coaches...Not a single person in support of a single thing the USTA is doing. NOT A SINGLE ONE. :(

    And so it begins. In my opinion, this will be bad for junior tennis in America - and it's a matter of fact that this will be bad for HIGH-TECH TENNIS.

    Sooo sad.
     
    #31
  32. seminoleG

    seminoleG Semi-Pro

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    Of course now each section will get their kids in the Hi Level events. USTA more WCs and more control. I know several that get WCs now and don't travel or chase points. So pucker up, and lay a fat one on USTAs cheeks!
     
    #32
  33. MarTennis

    MarTennis Rookie

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    Interesting

    I have not drilled down on this thread yet, but I get this gist. Parents upset their kid will unfairly not make the cut. Personally, I don't get it, yet. However, I like the idea the the real junior aspirants seeking to be world class as a junior tennis player would go find players to try to play regardless of tournament trappings. Think Big Bill Tilden or even Mike Tyson. The next world class American is simply some hungry tennis kid with the right tools who seeks to play anybody anywhere and actually sets upon doing it.
     
    #33
  34. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Tennisforlife,

    Great name.... unless you're a junior player in 2014.
    Thanks for sharing your info.

    And thank you to everyone in the past who has contributed with their knowledge.
    One of the emails I received about this contained a link to our junior trenches post with the original proposal in it :)
    News does fly around the internet and we helped to get the word out :)

    The bad news is well, that it passed.
    Sadly, this kills junior tennis for years to come.

    The good new is that at least the tennis community is not in the dark anymore and the changes won't be a surprise.
    And of course, we have this beauty of a quote from Pat Mac to explain his philosophy about the USTA and their changes:
    "We can’t—and we won’t—allow short-sightedness to interfere with long-term vision."
    So, now everyone knows what is really going on with the USTA, PD and their "long term vision".

    Just a side note on how bad it will be compared to today,
    if you look at the Easter Bowl alternate list now,
    it is filled with 5 stars and blue chips who can't get in.
    The demand is overwhelming.....

    If anyone gets their hands on the actual passed proposal,
    ( it had to have been tweaked???? I heard the sectionals were trying to get some concessions in....)
    please post it here.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
    #34
  35. tennisforlife77

    tennisforlife77 Rookie

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    Here are the changes trhat were made to the original proposal - this is the latest version i have

    The following changes have been made in this February 14, 2012 Revised Proposal
    1. At the request of the Constitution & Rules Committee to change one of the similar names of the two tournaments with
    “Masters” in the title, the name of the USTA National Masters has been changed to the USTA National Sweet Sixteen;
    2. The singles event of one Sectional Level 3 National Ranking Tournament is now required to be held in January, but is no
    longer required to start on Martin Luther King Weekend;
    3. The following changes have been made to the USTA National Clay Court Championships:
    • The draw sizes in the 18, 16, and 14 divisions have been increased from 64 singles/32 doubles to 128 singles/64 doubles.
    • Although the date of the USTA National Clay Court Championships is not included in USTA Regulations, the revised
    tournament calendar for 2014 and beyond shows the tournament has been moved from Memorial Day Weekend to July.
    4. The following additional changes have been made to facilitate the changes to the USTA National Clay Court Championships:
    • Although the dates of tournaments are not included in the USTA Regulations, the revised tournament calendar shows: the
    Mar/Apr USTA National Sweet Sixteen (formerly the USTA National Masters) and USTA Regional Tournament has been
    moved to Memorial Day Weekend; The July USTA National Sweet Sixteen (formerly the USTA National Masters) has been
    moved to October concurrent with the USTA Regional Tournaments; The July USTA Regional Tournaments are now
    concurrent with the USTA National Clay Court Championships;
    • Because there is no longer a USTA National Sweet Sixteen (formerly the USTA National Masters) immediately preceding The
    USTA National Championships (Hard Courts), the players no longer qualify for the Hard Courts. The USTA National Sweet
    Sixteen that has been moved to October shall be a qualifier for the USTA National Winter Team Championships - Level 1.
    The Level 1 Team Championship draw size has been increased from 16 players in each division to 32, and from 8 teams to
    16, to accommodate these qualifiers and so the Level 1 event of 16 teams more closely resembles the final site rounds of
    the NCAA team championships.
    • BG 16/14 National Hard Court Quota: The total quota has been increased by 16 to replace the 16 players that previously
    qualified from the USTA National Sweet Sixteen (formerly the USTA National Masters).
    • BG18/16/14 National Clay Court Quota: The total quota has been increased due to the increase in draw size from 64 to 128.
    Additionally, the minimum quota has been increased from 1 to 2 in these events.
    • BG18 National Clay Court Wild Cards: The number of wild cards has been increased due to the increase in the draw size
    from 64 to 128. The number is 16, the same number of wild cards available for the National Hard Courts.
    • To preserve the historical significance of the Easter Bowl and to have competition in all divisions on the national schedule
    between February and the end of May, a new tournament in the 16, 14, and 12 divisions will be sanctioned concurrent with
    the BG18 Easter Bowl ITF to be held at the same site. The draw size is 32 singles/16 doubles and player will be selected
    based on the National Standings List
     
    #35
  36. tball2day

    tball2day Semi-Pro

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    .......................
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012
    #36
  37. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Thanks, but this is NOT the new amendment.

    This is the 2014 proposal that came out in Feb.

    And yes, they cut the Hard and Clay courts to 64, and then brought them back to 128, WHICH IS STILL A BIG CUT FROM WHERE THEY ARE TODAY,
    and then helped themselves to more wildcards saying they are increasing the draws when they area actually cutting the draws....... Disgusting.
    But, now at least everyone knows what they are doing.....
     
    #37
  38. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    Here It Is -

    Per Zoo Tennis

    ( Colette, thank you for posting this. You are really a class act!)

    http://tenniskalamazoo.blogspot.com/

    Today at the USTA meeting in La Costa, Californina, the proposed changes to the formats and schedules of junior competition were passed by a vote of 16-1, with the Southern section the only section to vote against the proposal.

    As I noted back in February, it is much too complicated for me to go into detail about, but here are some of the major changes for 2014:

    18s Spring Championships will be eliminated

    The Easter Bowl, now including the 12s, will be reduced to 32 draws except for the ITF, which will remain 64

    The clay and hard courts will be 128 draws (starting in 2013) for the 14s, 16s and 18s,; the 12s will be 64 draws.
    The Winter Nationals will now be team events for the 14s, 16s and 18s, with the 12s competition eliminated.

    There will be a National Doubles tournaments for the 16s and 14s age divisions.

    Two new "Sweet 16" events for 14s and 16s and a new "Grand Masters" event, with small compass draws in 14s, 16s, and 18s have be introduced.

    Quotas have been changed to emphasize strength of competition in the section, not simply membership, which is the case now.

    Regional tournaments are restricted geographically.

    For those interested, I published coach Tom Walker's objections to this plan last week.

    The vote was decisive in favor of the plan, so now the task of explaining all these changes, clearly and

    concisely, to every junior player and his or her parents and coach is the USTA's next major undertaking.

    I look forward to learning along with all of you.

    I do not have the proposal as actually passed available,

    but it's my understanding that the only changes were in the regions.

    Everything else is as it is explained in this document.


    -------------------------------------------------------------
    ( You can comment on this on Zoo tennis - handles seem to be accepted there :))


    My comments:

    EASTER BOWL - 32 draw.... which I believe had some wild cards for that.
    Try to understand how limiting this is - the 16's for example goes across 3 grades.
    16's -
    you have kids who turned 15 already in 9th grade already...,
    you have 15 year olds in tenth grade that are turning 16 in the spring.
    and you have 16 years olds in 11th grade that turn 17 late spring/summer.
    32 draw means blue chips will not even get in.

    WINTER NATIONALS - GONE.
    Replaced with team tennis - defined in original proposal as:

    USTA National Winter Team Championships - Level 1, a Gold Ball tournament
    where the 16 top players in the country in the 18s, 16s and 14s divisions
    are waterfalled so that each team is comprised of players in all three divisions,
    ( later it says)
    Selection shall be done using wild cards and the most recently published National Standings List.
    The Committee has yet to determine the number of wild cards and will be making this decision prior to the submission of call items.
    ( 16 kids for a Gold ball? And some are wild card in?)


    CLAYS AND HARDS are reduced soon...
    by 2013.
    Many less kids are going to get exposure to college coaches.
    And remember the kicker, they increased the wild cards from 8 to 16,
    but decreased the tournament from 192 to 128.
    The 12's for clays and hards are really being shrunk to 64.
    So sad, how do you shrink the younger age groups as they haven't even begun?

    The youngest age groups are hit the worst. 10's are gone, and now 12's seem to be disappearing.

    The following are my notes from the original document ( that appears to have gone through?)

    LEVEL 2 - USTA National Selection Tournaments.
    ( We did have 4 - Thanksgiving, Feb, May and July 2nd,
    this is cutting it back to 2, but with same draw size of 32 )

    • USTA National President’s Day Tournament
    • USTA National Thanksgiving Tournament
    Three concurrent tournaments shall be sanctioned for 3-day date blocks
    over the President’s Day weekend and Thanksgiving weekend.
    The draw sizes shall be 32 singles with an FIC format and 16 doubles single elimination.
    One tournament shall be sanctioned on hard courts, one on clay courts, and one on indoor hard courts.



    LEVEL 3 - USTA Regional Tournaments - Level 3.
    ( We have 4 Regionals Labor Day, Columbus Day, January, and July 9th,
    here it appears to be cutting back to 3 times a year,
    )
    and players must play in their own region... sorta of defeats the whole idea of a national tournament
    and getting out there an playing juniors from different parts of the country?)


    I will encourage anyone with a young boy ( before they spend the $$$$$)
    that there is no future for their kids anymore in this sport for college tennis.
    Tennis for future boys will have to be viewed as a rec sport now.

    Heartbreaking for junior tennis in America. Ramifications are huge for the littlest ones. :(
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
    #38
  39. HIGH-TECH TENNIS

    HIGH-TECH TENNIS Rookie

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    Tennis5-could not agree with you more. :( And the vast majority of players / parents have no idea what's coming. :(

    Heartbreaking for junior tennis in America. Ramifications are huge for the littlest ones.
     
    #39
  40. 10ismom

    10ismom Semi-Pro

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    The changes might result in more JUNIOR RECREATIONAL TENNIS PLAYERS in the US, therefore, growing the game fullfilling USTA's mission.

    A handful of ( very top of the food chain) kids with SLAM or pro potential will continue to develope via the new changes.

    Majority, middle of the pack kids will just keep playing again and again within their own pack.

    Many will not go college route . Easier....for college coaches to welcome foreign ex pros, older players to join their teams.

    Many US junior players will take a turn...... and play REC. Tennis.

    HIGH-TECH TENNIS - I agree, you should branch out to other sports too. For tennis, you could help parents with videos for colleges since National venue play is not going to be college showcase for many, many kids.
     
    #40
  41. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    Anyone out there who has a young boy who shows interest and/or ability at tennis.......please support him with all the resources you have available!!

    Let his interest and ability take him to the highest level he can achieve, whether it is pro, D-I, other college, club or rec.

    It is parents' jobs, I think, to maximize our kids' options when they are young, not cut them off.

    It is hard for me to relate to the thinking of parents who decide which activities to promote for their youngsters based on the probability of that youngster getting a college scholarship for it.

    But anyway, nothing the USTA has recently decided will diminish the number of tennis scholarships available. Nothing the USTA has recently decided will prevent the cream from rising to the top. According to Dallas Oliver, nothing the USTA has decided will prevent TRN from continuing to validly recognize a player's ranking compared to his peers.

    The rules are the same for everyone. And heck, if some parents agree with the poster I quoted and disagree with me...........there will be fewer people competing for the goals you set out to achieve, which will only enhance your chances to achieve them!
     
    #41
  42. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    I am saddened that the USTA is shrinking the competitions domestically. I am a free market thinker when it comes to the selection of players to the college ranks and have voiced my opinion recently in the foreign vs American debates on these boards. Unfortunately, what the USTA is doing is making it harder for an American player to prove their worth in the junior ranks. It will thus be that much harder for the college coaches to fairly assess the talents of Americans vs their international counterparts.

    Time will tell, but my opinion is that the USTA is taking a huge gamble based on statistics they have on hand. I just wonder if those stats were accurately evaluated.
     
    #42
  43. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
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    You state -
    It is parents' jobs, I think, to maximize our kids' options when they are young, not cut them off.

    Read the document - The USTA already cut off the options.


    Not sure where you are coming from,
    but THE WHOLE POINT IS THE RULES ARE NOT THE SAME FOR EVERYONE.
    The draws for Clay and Hard have been cut by 33%, the wild cards have increased by 100%.
    Wild cards are not handed out by qualifier tournaments, but by the powers of the USTA.
    Easter Bowl has been cut by 75% with still wild cards still being given.
    Winter Nationals has been cut by 86% with wild cards primarily making up the draw.
    WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT?

    As a new poster, I am not sure what your day job is besides posting on this blog.
    Maybe you work for a racquet company, junior tennis clothing, college recruiting company..
    But, it appears you have a mission of promoting intentionally misleading information.

    I will not be responding to your posts again.
    I am trying to get accurate, truthful information out to folks so they can make intelligent decisions with their hard earned money.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
    #43
  44. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    Good one! I am at 1.89 posts per day, right now. That's about 4 hours per post to make up my eight hour workday!!!

    It is not the USTA's job to raise our kids. No more than it is Cal Ripken's job in baseball or AAU in basketball. You and I disagree, but that's fine. The real difference between us is that you have some need to personally disparage people you disagree with and I don't.

    FTD, I invite you to embellish on your point that this will make it easier for college coaches to evaluate foreigners than domestic players. Sincere question, not a challenge.

    At worst, a college-worthy player will be relegated to his section more than previously....although the player would be able to find some out-of-section opens. If the player does well in-section, he/she will get to the nationals. The foreigner will be in another country. How will it be easier to evaluate the foreigner?

    The flip-side of this coin relates to the concern raised by many (not me) that State schools should recruit players from within-State as a priority. If in fact the USTA's action will make it harder for college coaches to evaluate talent across the nation, it should help the chances of the in-state kids.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
    #44
  45. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    I agree with what you're saying, I don't see college scholarships being given out any different tomorrow than they are today. The trend for internationals playing college tennis I believe has been slightly increasing year over year, without the new rules. So if the international participation goes up next year and the following as it has been it will be difficult to point to the new rules as a cause. At the same time also agree that the USTA making these decisions without consulting the memberships to be somewhat questionable.

    Why did the new rules get passed by the sections unanimously 16-1?

    However, with the addition of Regional Nationals in 2011 against the nationals draw shrinkage in 2012 I am wondering with the lack of massive widespread outrage, and I realize there is outrage, is this really just hand wringing?
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
    #45
  46. dallasoliver

    dallasoliver Rookie

    Joined:
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    All -

    There are a few comments on here that are similar in spirit to this one. I am going to make some comments here.

    The fact is that such a proposition - a national junior tennis association outside the confines of the USTA - is a huge undertaking. I would not say impossible, but it is huge. It would take a set of committed people that are willing to invest a tremendous amount of time and money. And it would take some time.

    Over the past few years, several people have approached us about starting third-party organizations whose results would be used in TennisRecruiting.net (TRN) rankings. At the end of the day, none of those organizations have ever gone anywhere.

    These are fine ideas for structuring tournaments, but I don't think you need to go so far. In fact, there is no reason to go outside of the USTA infrastructure.

    Historically, there have been a number of strong open tournaments run by individual tournament directors at the section or district level. (We call those "Sectional Opens".) Players are welcome to compete in Sectional Opens - they are usually well-run tournaments run by experienced directors, players will face unfamiliar competition, and results will be used in TRN rankings.

    Over the coming months, we at TRN will try to do a better job at publicizing these Sectional Opens - I started a new thread here on the forum to show some of the ones coming up over the next few months.


    I hope these comments make sense. We'll see how things shake out for us at TRN - we are pretty optimistic.

    Best,
    Dallas
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
    #46
  47. 10ismom

    10ismom Semi-Pro

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    I am not FTD but I can logically think of reasons why it will be easier for college coaches who have limited budget and time (to check US kids out at several regionals rather than national venues) to judge more talents on papers and videos.

    Several foreign players with pro experience on their resume, might become even more attractive now than before. Several college coaches already think of recruiting players more of....a hiring process...to fill the vacant positions. The message on this board I gathered....rarely coaches will want talent kids on the team to coach and develop. They'd rather wants kids that are ready to play to win.

    So it might become a no brainer....to get the older, foreign players, with pro experience since their resume look better on paper, than many US juniors with limited head-head comparison across top level reference players.

    Not many hidden American talents (unseed players who can beat seeded national players) will be found EASILY. Coaches will not have chances to observe kids with INTANGIBLE during their national tournaments like it use to be.

    Coaches with less motivation or funding will end up sorting through webpages after pages,....youtubes after youtubes...to fill their team.

    Private college showcases charge significant amount of money and in limited locations. I imagine that may limit to kids and families who can afford them.
     
    #47
  48. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    So true, anyone can attest to the huge number of coaches that could be found at Kalamazoo that they were just looking beyond the numbers.

    Just looking at tournaments over the past few months where there was a huge upset where a much lower ranked player beat a blue chip.

    But, that is the thing about tennis, it is not a geometry or algebraic puzzle where just because
    Player A beat Player B,
    Player B beat Player C,
    then Player A must beat Player C.
    No, sometimes, Player C does beat Player A.

    It is that perfect moment of opportunity that has been taken away.
     
    #48
  49. tball2day

    tball2day Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Messages:
    603
    ........................
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012
    #49
  50. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2012
    Messages:
    1,976
    Sure.

    I think, like most, that it just makes it harder for a kid to compete with the top tier elite players. I didn't think I was saying that it will be "easier" to recruit internationally. The system has not changed internationally so it won't be easier or harder to recruit them. I think that it will just be a harder task for coaches to judge Americans amongst each other since there will be less opportunities to evaluate them.

    I think that if anyone were to have an opportunity, it would be the big academies. They can send out invitations to a group of 100-200 players to hold giant "combines" for the kids to work out over 3-5 day periods. Invite the college coaches to attend and promote it as a chance to see the kids work out, drill, and compete.

    This guy is probably licking his chops: http://combines.underarmour.com/news/article/18
     
    #50

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